Thread: Everything you need to know about the college basketball scandal

jszfunk - 2/27/2018 at 12:27 PM

Kind of a long read if you have sometime


http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/22555512/explaining- ncaa-college-basketball-scandal-players-coaches-agents


LeglizHemp - 2/27/2018 at 03:04 PM

It's time to pay the college players, all of the major colleges support it under the table. Let's bring it into the daylight.


porkchopbob - 2/27/2018 at 10:06 PM

quote:
It's time to pay the college players, all of the major colleges support it under the table. Let's bring it into the daylight.


I totally disagree. Adding more money to the situation will make the situation worse, blurring the line between academics and employees. Plenty of these student athletes already get scholarships, they are still "students" first. Athletic Directors and Coaches are the ones at fault, the system shouldn't change because these guys who should know better are greasing the wheels and cheating.

This isn't as much of an issue in baseball because the MLB farm system has more of a presence than college baseball. I get that the NBA doesn't want to compete with the NCAA, they are symbiotic, but maybe a more intensive farm system is in order. Or ADs could stop cheating, since it's the University that is burdened with the penalties (players involved are often pro by the time an investigation concludes). Schools that are irresponsible and don't police themselves over player "signings" deserve what they get.


LeglizHemp - 2/28/2018 at 01:57 AM

sorry man but i could not agree less. its all over now.


PhotoRon286 - 2/28/2018 at 03:06 AM

quote:
sorry man but i could not agree less. its all over now.


Yup.

Disgusting that the ncaa and the universities can sell a jersey with the player's name and number and make money, yet the player gets zero.

Saw a great article about a lawsuit filed by a former player.

The ncaa is using a Constitutional defense that equates the players with prisoners working for the state (or slaves) and not deserving compensation.

https://theintercept.com/2018/02/22/ncaa-student-athletes-unpaid-prison/


[Edited on 2/28/2018 by PhotoRon286]


jszfunk - 2/28/2018 at 12:10 PM



I don't agree with paying them, but it wont matter. Palms will still be greased under the table and back door deals being done.

If they do pay them will players 20-50yrs ago get retro pay then?

What about he NCAA volleyball, Lacrosse, swimmers, etc.... do they get paid too?

I am not sure what the solution is.



It's all about money, greed and power. Sad

[Edited on 2/28/2018 by jszfunk]


porkchopbob - 2/28/2018 at 02:56 PM

quote:
Disgusting that the ncaa and the universities can sell a jersey with the player's name and number and make money, yet the player gets zero.


I never thought schools should be able to do this, but then again, I never thought college players should have their names on their jerseys. I also think student athletes should be able to endorse products if they want, so long as it doesn't conflict with the school.

But if students at state universities start getting paid to play, there will still be money under the table to induce them to sign and stay at one school or another. It doesn't solve the problem, it just increases the amount of money handed out. Many student athletes already are paid with scholarships while English majors work 2 jobs and graduate with great debt. With student debt increasing for those who actually want a higher education, it's disingenuous to then funnel more money towards student athletes.

Then again, as much as I enjoy watching sports, I don't think the highest paid state employee should be a college football coach. As states slash budgets, college athletic departments should see increasingly smaller budgets, not larger ones.


Bhawk - 2/28/2018 at 04:22 PM

quote:
Many student athletes already are paid with scholarships while English majors work 2 jobs and graduate with great debt. With student debt increasing for those who actually want a higher education, it's disingenuous to then funnel more money towards student athletes.


Nobody pays $150 a seat and $450 on officially licensed merch to watch an English major write a paper.

Consider how much money is made on college sports and run that against institutional cost of scholarships. The ROI is amazing...

"Each generation of young persons come along and all they ask is, 'Coach, give me a chance, I can do it.' And it's a disservice to these young people that the management of intercollegiate athletics stays in place committed to an outmoded code of amateurism. And I attribute that to, quite frankly, to the neo-plantation mentality that exists on the campuses of our country and in the conference offices and in the NCAA."

-Walter Byers, first President of the NCAA.


porkchopbob - 2/28/2018 at 05:07 PM

quote:
Nobody pays $150 a seat and $450 on officially licensed merch to watch an English major write a paper.

Consider how much money is made on college sports and run that against institutional cost of scholarships. The ROI is amazing...


Yes of course, but that's exactly the point. The purpose of a university is education, athletics are extra-curricular. Sure, the athletics makes the university some money (sometimes a lot of money) which goes towards funding other academic endeavors, athletics that don't bring in money (see Title IX), or a professor's salary, not into the student athletes' pockets. That's called an "employee". The university is giving the student athlete a national showcase to compete which is invaluable, meanwhile the Athletic Department's revenue is helping to keep tuition down so the English major can afford to write that paper. I went to a BIG 10 school, athletes are taken care of very well even without the coaches bribing them.

Even though Athletic Departments can bring in a lot of money, state and local tax money is still the primary funding for most public universities, yet you want to use it to pay students on top of their scholarships (which are often considered taxable income)? It's not a for-profit business. Where does it end? Should the college band get a portion of the gate? Should theatre majors get part of the box-office? Should public high schools pay their students athletes?

Meanwhile, your average college instructor (not professors, mind you) can't make a living teaching college courses full-time. But student athletes should benefit even more than they already do?

[Edited on 2/28/2018 by porkchopbob]


jszfunk - 2/28/2018 at 06:44 PM

quote:
quote:
Nobody pays $150 a seat and $450 on officially licensed merch to watch an English major write a paper.

Consider how much money is made on college sports and run that against institutional cost of scholarships. The ROI is amazing...


Yes of course, but that's exactly the point. The purpose of a university is education, athletics are extra-curricular. Sure, the athletics makes the university some money (sometimes a lot of money) which goes towards funding other academic endeavors, athletics that don't bring in money (see Title IX), or a professor's salary, not into the student athletes' pockets. That's called an "employee". The university is giving the student athlete a national showcase to compete which is invaluable, meanwhile the Athletic Department's revenue is helping to keep tuition down so the English major can afford to write that paper. I went to a BIG 10 school, athletes are taken care of very well even without the coaches bribing them.

Even though Athletic Departments can bring in a lot of money, state and local tax money is still the primary funding for most public universities, yet you want to use it to pay students on top of their scholarships (which are often considered taxable income)? It's not a for-profit business. Where does it end? Should the college band get a portion of the gate? Should theatre majors get part of the box-office? Should public high schools pay their students athletes?

Meanwhile, your average college instructor (not professors, mind you) can't make a living teaching college courses full-time. But student athletes should benefit even more than they already do?

[Edited on 2/28/2018 by porkchopbob]


Excellent points on your last two posts. My sentiments exactly.


Bhawk - 2/28/2018 at 09:53 PM

quote:
quote:
Nobody pays $150 a seat and $450 on officially licensed merch to watch an English major write a paper.

Consider how much money is made on college sports and run that against institutional cost of scholarships. The ROI is amazing...


Yes of course, but that's exactly the point. The purpose of a university is education, athletics are extra-curricular. Sure, the athletics makes the university some money (sometimes a lot of money) which goes towards funding other academic endeavors, athletics that don't bring in money (see Title IX), or a professor's salary, not into the student athletes' pockets. That's called an "employee". The university is giving the student athlete a national showcase to compete which is invaluable, meanwhile the Athletic Department's revenue is helping to keep tuition down so the English major can afford to write that paper. I went to a BIG 10 school, athletes are taken care of very well even without the coaches bribing them.

Even though Athletic Departments can bring in a lot of money, state and local tax money is still the primary funding for most public universities, yet you want to use it to pay students on top of their scholarships (which are often considered taxable income)? It's not a for-profit business. Where does it end? Should the college band get a portion of the gate? Should theatre majors get part of the box-office? Should public high schools pay their students athletes?

Meanwhile, your average college instructor (not professors, mind you) can't make a living teaching college courses full-time. But student athletes should benefit even more than they already do?

[Edited on 2/28/2018 by porkchopbob]


You got it man. Eff the "student athlete." Universities can profit off of them as much as they can.


porkchopbob - 2/28/2018 at 10:14 PM

quote:
You got it man. Eff the "student athlete." Universities can profit off of them as much as they can.



They can go to hell with their (possibly free) education, housing, degree, national exposure, & experience preparing them for their professional career! Such a shame they really come out of this so empty handed.

You do realize the scandal is that grown men are bribing teenagers so their programs succeed? These kids aren't begging Auburn's Athletic Department like paupers for 5 figure hand outs so they can buy a keg on the weekend. Do you think Chuck Person and Sean Miller were handing out large sums of money because it's the right thing to do or because they benefit in the long term?

There is a lot wrong with costs and spending on higher ed that could fill several other threads, but student athletes already get far more perks than your average college student.


Bhawk - 3/1/2018 at 02:44 AM

Yup. Eff em.


robslob - 3/2/2018 at 10:38 PM

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2018/03/01/sean-miller-fo rcefully-denies-allegations-he-paid-deandre-ayton-to-play-at-arizona/?utm_t erm=.e9a7f92df161

First it came out that the FBI said it had a wiretap of coach Sean Miller (Arizona) discussing a $100,000 payment to a recruit. Now Miller forcibly denies it. This could get interesting. Well, Miller denies MAKING the payment. Does that mean he also denies even discussing it?


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