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Author: Subject: Stefani Scamardo appreciation

Zen Peach





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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 05:14 AM
I believe it was Haisija who requested this. Sounds great to me too!

Let's face it. She's one lucky lady!! Here's a great article from awhile back that always warms my heart!! Warren and Stef have been together for a long time! Here's to many, many years together because they are obviously very good together!

Confessions of A Hard Head: Manager's Corner with Gov't Mule's Stefani Scamardo

by Jeff Waful

Stefani Scamardo is the founder of Hard Head Management in New York City. She is also the wife and manager of Warren Haynes and Gov't Mule. She recently took time out her extremely busy schedule to talk with Jambands.com about the chaotic world of the music business, the tragic loss of Allen Woody and new beginnings for Gov't Mule.

JW: Why don't we start with your background and how you got into the music business.

SS: I graduated from George Washington University in 1988 with a degree in psychology and sociology and a minor in philosophy. I moved to New York and I had no idea what I wanted to do. What I thought I wanted to do was to become some sort of psychologist or something that utilized my major; working with teenagers or problem children. The problem was, I came to New York and I didn't know anyone. All of the jobs were just horrendous, you know what I mean? I would get this great offer for good money to run a halfway house or something like that, but it would be in some crazy area. So, nothing ever felt right. There were all these crazy jobs and I wasn't quite sure what to do and it was my father actually who said 'listen, why don't you go and get a job and try to work on finding something in what you've always wanted to do' and I was like 'well, what do you mean, like music?' I was so ignorant that I never even thought about the fact that there was a business behind this thing that I just loved, you know? There was a business behind all of these shows I went to and the albums I bought. I was ignorant I guess. I was a kid from Virginia and I had spent my whole life playing music. I had played the drums and electric guitar and was in some bands in high school. When I went to college I played NCAA Division I soccer for the George Washington Colonials and it took a lot of time. For six hours a day I ran, worked out, practiced and all that as well as maintaining a full schedule at school so it was hard to play music then, but I continued to be a fan. I was a big Deadhead. I pretty much spent all of my time divided between the East Coast and West Coast doin' the Dead tours and stuff, even during school.

So I was here in New York and my dad kind of gave me some insight and so I got an advertising gig at a media house, just a starting position making like eighteen grand a year and I went to audio engineering school at the Mann School of Music. It's part of the New School for Social Research and I figured I'd start with the basics 'how do you make a record?' I really didn't have a clue, you know? It was a really interesting class. It was at a studio. I had never been in a recording studio, so I really, really loved it. On the first day of class we were all sitting in a circle and the teacher asked us each why we were there. So we went around the circle and I said, 'I want to be in the music business. I want to make records and work on tours and be creative and find talent and market talent.' I didn't really know exactly what I wanted to do, but I knew I wanted to be involved and I wanted to be a part of everything really. Another woman in the class was an A & R executive at Island Records and wanted to learn more about recording since she oversaw all of the recording at Island. So I said to myself 'you know what? This is my girl right here.' I worked it. I spent the next couple weeks basically pleading to get a gig at Island Records and a few weeks into it, they offered me an internship. I quit my job to go be an intern in the A & R department, which at the time was exactly what I thought I wanted to do: to scout new talent and oversee the recording. It was great. It was the best decision I ever made in my entire life. I was there for just a couple of months and then got hired as the A & R assistant.

Through the next few years I worked my way up through the ranks of the A & R department. I was the national A & R coordinator. I oversaw all the recording. I also oversaw all remixes and did all of the negotiations and helped find the producers, the remixers and the talent. I worked on both creative and administrative sides of the A & R department, which was a really great experience for me. Towards the end, I wanted to sign my own bands. I was really good at working with all of these A & R people and their projects. All I wanted to do was sign bands and make my own records and there wasn't a position open for that, so what I did was I started a management company out of the extra bedroom in mine and Warren's apartment. I'd have this kid show up at like 9:45 every morning and I'd give him a list of things to do that day and then I'd go to Island and work. During lunch, I'd call the kid and check in on him and comment on all of the things that he had been working on. Then he'd wait for me to get home and we'd go over stuff and send some packages out.

This went on for a few months. The band I was working with at the time was a band called Xanax 25. I had taken this band from pretty much unknown status to the point where we made some demos, they started gigging, their tours were doing good, we had gotten them the H.O.R.D.E. tour opening for Blues Traveler and finally when they were making some money. I said, 'hey, you know what? I could do this full time.' So I quit my gig at Island and ran my management company. I signed a series of bands, a lot of cool New York talent, one band was Cherokee Sex Workshop, who became Walkin' Bird. I was really successful with the Xanax 25 project. They eventually wound up having a lot of internal and personal problems, but I had kind of proven myself at that point with that project. Enough so that about a year or so after I started the company in '96 Allen Woody and Matt Abts asked Warren if it was OK to ask me to manage their band. That's what I was doing at the time, working with a lot of younger bands because I was kind of an unknown manager, so I had to sign the bands at a young level and just kind of create the momentum. So it was good to see people recognizing that and being at a larger status and wanting me to work with them. It was very exciting. I came in the summer of '96 and immediately put a lot into action with Gov't Mule. We put out the "Live at Roseland" record and we booked them three months on the Black Crowes national tour at the time, so it was kind of a great way to up the ante on what I was doing. We then signed them to Capricorn Records. We made the record "Dose" and pretty much hit the road hard-core and started all the grassroots marketing and fanbase development that we're seeing now.

JW: I want to back up for a second. You briefly mentioned the apartment that you and Warren shared. You graduated in '88. When did you meet Warren?

SS: It's kind of an infamous story. Warren and I came together very much through fate. I was a big Deadhead. My best friend and I had just graduated college in '88 and in the summer of '89 the Allman Brothers were doing their first tour in, I don't even know how many years. It was their big reunion and Warren of course was in the band and my best friend Amy and myself went to go see the Dead do their final show at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia. It was the last show before they shut it down. It was a big deal. So the next day we really didn't have any plans and we were in Philadelphia. We woke up and we were like, 'what are we gonna do today?' This was back in the days when there were no worries. I'm from the Washington DC-area and I said 'you know, the Allman Brothers have reunited and are playing at Merriweather Post in Baltimore' and she was like 'Oh my God, let's go, lets go' and I told her 'dude, that's show's been sold out for months' and she said 'no, you gotta call, you gotta call.' So, I called up Merriweather Post. I didn't even call Ticketmaster. Someone in the box office answered and I was like 'Hey, can I get any tickets for the Allman Brothers tonight?' The woman told me 'man, you're not going to believe this. The show's been sold out for like two months, but the band just gave us two tickets that they didn't use and there're about four hundred people out here waiting to get tickets, but because I answered the phone, you have the right to these tickets. Do you want them? I need to know right now.' I was like 'I'll take them.'

So I gave her my credit card number and never looked back. We never even found out what time the show was. We took a shower, grabbed some hoagies, grabbed some beer and we were on our way to Baltimore. So we got there and had missed the whole first set. The show started at like 6:00 and we got there at 7:30. Because we had those house seats that the band had given back to the promoter, we were sitting in the midst of all of the band's and the promoter's friends. We had twelfth row seats. They were the best seats I had ever had for any concert, you know? During that setbreak and the second set my friend and I were having a good time with everyone, enjoying ourselves and everybody was like 'you guys are great.' The Allman Brothers are having a party after the show. Do you guys want to come?' I was 22 or 23 years old and had never been backstage in my life. So we went backstage and we met Warren and he's just like the nicest guy in the world. We immediately just kind of gravitated towards him and Woody. They were obviously very young, open and friendly and talkative, more so than say, Dickey (Betts) and Gregg (Allman). They were a little bit more accessible. So we had a great time. Back then the band used to leave at three in the morning. I think it was to kind of to control the elements. People could do whatever they wanted, but at three they were getting on the bus and going to the next show. That way nobody could get into too much trouble. So we had no place to stay. We had just driven down there from Philly. So they gave us their hotel rooms, invited us to come to Philadelphia the next week and said they'd leave tickets for us at the box office. We were totally ecstatic.

We went to the show the next week at the Spectrum in Philly and had a great time. It was the same situation. Hung out with the guys after the show, they got on the bus to leave and we got their hotel rooms. It was great, you know?

JW: It's a pretty good gig, yeah.

SS: Pretty good gig (laughs). Anyway, Warren had given me his number and at this point there wasn't anything between us except we just thought he was the coolest, nicest guy who was obviously very talented and just very fun to hang out with. He had given me his number and he said 'look, call me sometime. I'd love to see you guys when I'm in New York or whatever.' So I didn't think much about it and a month or so went by and we heard on the radio that the Allman Brothers were playing five nights at the Beacon Theater in New York City. So the next day I called Warren in Nashville and Warren was like 'man, I cannot believe that you caught me at home. How did you know I was here? I'm here two days between the West Coast and East Coast tour. I can't believe you caught me here.' I told him that I had just heard about the Beacon shows and was calling to see if I could come. He said it was fine and put us on the list for all of the nights. That was when we really kind of hooked up because he spent the whole week in New York and we hung out, went to dinner, went to shows and really had a great time and that's when I realized what a great person he was. As crazy as it all seems, we were able to really develop a relationship in a good kind of pure way because he lived in Nashville and I lived in New York so we'd talk on the phone every night. So we really got to know each other. By the time we became very serious, it was kind of done the right way, you know? Even though we didn't get to date all the time, he'd come and visit me and I'd go and visit him. We spent a lot of time talking. It was a really cool way to develop a relationship actually. He's such a great person, that once we got together, we were together and we've never been apart since. We've been together since '89.

JW: So he moved to New York eventually?

SS: Very shortly actually, Probably in '90 and '91.

JW: What year did you make the transition to form Hard Head Management?

SS: I think that started in '93.

JW: Is there a meaning behind the name?

SS: (laughs) Warren thought it up. He just thinks I'm a hard head and he thinks that's a good thing. I'm very aggressive and have a strong personality. He thought it was just catchy. He calls me Hard Head all the time so he thought it would be a catchy name and I did too. We had a lot of cool names and I ran it by a lot of people and everyone agreed that that was it.

JW: In '97 Gov't Mule became a full time thing. When did you actually start managing the band?

SS: In the fall of 1996.

JW: Was there any concern about you managing Warren and mixing business and pleasure?

SS: Well Warren was the only one who was concerned. It was his two band members that came to him and said that they wanted me to manage them. So Warren's only concern was that he didn't want to hear any **** down the line about any conflicts. In a lot of circumstances, it might not work. I happen to be a very professional manager and he is probably one of the most professional artists out there and so is Matt and so was Woody. It actually was never a problem. I think they feel good because they feel like no one else would look after the band more than I would. I mean, who would care more about the success of the band? It has a direct impact on not only my professional life, but my personal life as well. So, it was actually a really big responsibility and sometimes I feel like I'm under even more pressure than a normal manager would be, you know what I mean? A normal manager would be able to separate. He would be able to go home at night and say 'you know if I screwed that up, than I screwed it up.' But for me if I screw up, it screws things up for Warren and Matt and Woody. It's so personal and I actually think it makes my job harder. I think it allows the band to have this piece of mind knowing that I'm the one person that's reliable, whereas for me it kind of stresses me out a lot, you know?

JW: Yeah I can relate to that. I live with the band that I manage. There's no escaping the business aspect sometimes.

SS: Yeah, it's very hard. Warren's very busy, so sometimes we'll be home at night and he'll ask me about something at like one in the morning. If I didn't work for him, he wouldn't be asking me those questions. We'd be talking about like 'what's your mom up to?'

JW: Do you guys ever just take a week off and just get away and not deal with anything? It seems like Warren's always playing.

SS: The only time I can say we ever really took ten days off was for our honeymoon. I think I got one or two FedEx packages the whole time I was there. It was at a time in '97 when Warren wasn't in the Allman Brothers and "Dose" hadn't come out yet, so it was a time when we could afford to do that. Since "Dose" came out in the spring of '98, literally it has been nonstop. We worked "Dose" so hard in '98. We recorded the New Year's show in '98 and had that record out by March. So, in two and a half months, we mixed, edited, chose tracks, did artwork and wrote all the liner notes and credits. We're still working "Dose." We're working "Live with a Little Help From Our Friends." In the midst of that, we put together a four-CD box set. Meanwhile, we're scheduling 250 tour dates year as well as interviews and TV appearances. It's been full on. The four-CD box set came out in the fall of '99 and then in the spring of 2000, "Life Before Insanity" came out. Starting in February, we were doing Warren Haynes promo tour all over the country and trying to hit every morning show. I mean it was just nonstop. Basically when Woody died, it felt like being on a speeding bullet train that just like hit a steel wall. It really did feel like that. It felt like that exact analogy of being on this fast moving train, man, and just hitting this wall and everything blowing up. It was that kind of feeling.

JW: It must have been absolutely devastating. Was there any discussion of what you were going to do next or was it obvious that the band was going to keep moving forward?

SS: Yes and no. There has been and will be that discussion. The Woody thing was so devastating to me and Warren and Matt on so many levels, personally and professionally. There was a definite moment in time where I didn't know if I could continue to be a manager of bands anymore. There was a moment where I thought that putting all of this heart and soul and effort into something that can blow up in two seconds&there was that moment, but working with Warren is so special and that was just a fleeting moment because it doesn't take long to be inspired by him. He is such an inspiration to me that it kind of pushes me. We became inspired together and this whole new bass player tribute album came together. It's basically the next Gov't Mule studio record and instead of Woody or one bass player, there's twenty-five bass players.

JW: Pretty good line-up too.

SS: Yeah, pretty good line-up. All but like two songs are originals written by Warren and/or co-written by Warren and one of the players. The way that came about is, we'd be sitting around and I'd say 'So, any thought as to who you want to play bass with?' He'd look at me and go 'Well, I'm thinking about Jack Bruce or John Paul Jones or Les Claypool.' (laughs) I'd roll my eyes and say 'OK, that's really realistic honey. These people aren't going to drop what they're doing to go on tour and be a part of Gov't Mule.'

Finally there was this moment when it occurred to us that maybe these guys might not want to drop what they're doing for the next two years, but they may want to drop what they're doing for like a day and come and record a song with us. So that's kind of how the whole thing came about. We called Les Claypool and Phil (Lesh). Those were the first two phone calls we made and they were both like 'Sounds great. When do you want to do it?' It really inspired us and made us feel like these people respect us and they like Warren's playing. So we did it. We just started doing it. We recorded twelve of the bass players. We have four more confirmed for the May session and we're working on the last eight.

JW: Is there a tentative release date yet?

SS: No that's the other thing. We don't have a label right now.

JW: Because of the sale of Capricorn.

SS: Yup, Capricorn went bankrupt or whatever the hell happened. It ran out of money and they sold the catalog to Volcano, which was a lucky break for us. Warren's got so much momentum going right now, being the lead singer and lead guitar player in Phil & Friends, Allman Brothers, Gov't Mule and his solo acoustic thing. He's got so much momentum. This was a lucky opportunity for him to go get a new situation, a new push and new everything. It's kind of the same situation with Mule. We got a new band, new crew, new way of touring, new light show, new imaging, new logos, new merch&it's like, now's the time. We figure it's such a traumatic, **** ty thing to have happen, but it is fortunately a time for us to make change and that's what we're trying to do. It's kind of cool to have the opportunity to do it across the board, you know? New everything. It feels pretty good. It's a lot of pressure, but it feels good.

JW: You had mentioned something a while back about a possible Mike Gordon film documenting the album. What's the latest on that?

SS: It is so cool. Mike Gordon, the bass player from Phish is the director. He is documenting the whole thing. He is documenting the history of Gov't Mule, the making of this record, all of the behind-the-scenes stuff and all of the recording. He's actually in the room while they are recording. It's serious footage. We're doing it all to film. We have the DP (director of photography, Elia Lyssy) who did the Phish movie ("Bittersweet Motel"). It's killer. Mike's personally doing all of the interviews with all of the bass players. You know Mike. He's totally quirky and crazy. It's Mike. He's being creative. We pretty much told him 'You do what you see.' It's really cool because I'm not sure if a lot of people could get away with it. You know, is Jack Bruce going to put up with someone he doesn't know or have respect for filming him while he's recording? It's great to have someone that all of these bass players respect and admire talking to them and doing the interviews and being the one behind the camera. I don't think we could have asked for a better situation. He's such a sweet person and so great to work with as well as everyone in the Phish camp, really: his manager, John Paluska, Elia and Mike's producer. It's really a great experience. I'm actually learning a lot. Warren and I were very excited because we've never made a movie. It's very exciting seeing the dailies and everything. We're actually enjoying that a lot.

JW: What are the plans for the film? Is it going to go straight to video and be released through your website or is it going to be shown in theaters?

SS: Without having a record deal in place and not having that all in place, our intentions are full on to use the footage for a DVD, for commercial release, E.P.K., which is an Electronic Press Kit, and for website streaming. We'd like to think that VH1 or HBO or someone would be interested in doing something on the band. We're kind of looking at it like the sky's the limit. We're paying for all of this now. We made a conscious decision knowing that it was so much more expensive to go to film, we decided that we don't want to be limited as to the use of this footage because it's gonna be killer. I mean, the footage is killer. By putting it to film, we're assured that we at least have a shot at large cable networks or a high quality DVD.

JW: With the New School of Gov't Mule, obviously you're going to lose David Schools pretty soon because of Widespread Panic's touring plans. Has there been any talk of Mike or any other bassist doing a tour with Mule?

SS: Yeah, of course. There are a few other bass players too. Every one of the bass players that we've worked with to date has agreed to do performances with us in support of the release of this record. One of the things we're looking at for the fall, and I'm probably going to start working on it shortly, even though we don't have the deal intact, is the supporting tour for the release. It will probably be like ten to fifteen shows worldwide: Tokyo, London, Sydney, Vancouver, Montreal, New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Denver, Seattle, San Francisco and L.A., something like that. We're planning to have a handful of bass players, maybe more anywhere from five to fifteen, at each of those shows and try to make a big deal out of a short amount of time. We want to make a really big deal out of these fifteen shows and make them really special, something to never be repeated, a little piece of history, you know?

JW: All of those bass players are amazing, but one of the things that Warren and Matt had with Woody or that any band has that plays together for a long period of time is the chemistry that you get from performing with the same people day in and day out. Has there been any decision on if there will be a permanent new bass player with Gov't Mule?

SS: That's a tough one. There is discussion, but as of right now, that permanent member is not known to Warren or myself. Warren has developed a lot of great relationships over the years and he's been playing with a lot of great people. He's one of the few guys that's just so open-minded both musically and personally that he really gets along with all these different types of musicians and players. He's really lucky in that way, from the Grateful Dead, to the Allman Brothers, to Primus, to Dave Matthews&So right now what he feels good about is playing with these people that he knows and loves and that he thinks kick ass. I mean, Warren and Woody always wanted to bring Claypool out, before Woody died, just because they think he rules, you know? (laughs) They love him. They had never even met him and they loved him. Since Woody died, we're all about taking things at a very organic approach. I don't even know if Warren knows if Mule exists after this record, as Gov't Mule. We don't know. We're pretty sure that it's going to work itself out over the course of this year.

The New School of Gov't Mule tour has been going great. I went to opening night in Raleigh and it was the most exciting thing I had done in a very long time. The band walked on stage and had a standing ovation. There were 1,500 young, young kids there screaming and bouncing off the wall. They opened the show with "Thorazine Shuffle," which begins with a bass intro. It was a total balls-to-the-wall kind of move, since it was the first show since Woody died. But that's the deal, you know? It's like 'We're back and we're bigger than ever.' They're having fun and they're playing their ass off. The one thing that so many people commented to me is that they sound like a band. That's a hard thing to pull off, to do your first show with these people and come off sounding like a band. Granted, they did "One For Woody" and the "Warren Haynes Christmas Jam" with Dave Schools and Warren has worked with Chuck (Leavell) a lot in the past. They just did the Beacon together, so there's a lot of history and a lot of love there, but never have they done a Gov't Mule show together. They killed man. It was so tight. By the end of "Thorazine Shuffle" the place was so ballistic, it was like this huge drama. Matt had already done a drum solo. It was like completely out of control. It was the first song of the show, first song since Wood died and the song ended, the whole place was going crazy. I looked over at the president of this record company I was standing next to and I was like 'Dude, first song!' and the guy looked at me and was like 'Oh my God, I love these guys.' He was freakin' out. It was so exciting. If you didn't know our history, you wouldn't know that was the first song they ever played. You would have thought these guys were playing together for ten years. That has a lot to do with how professional those guys are. You're talking about some of the best players in the world.

JW: How were the Beacon Theater shows with the Allman Brothers? It was the first time that Warren had played a multiple night run with the band in a long time. What was the experience like? What's the future look like?

SS: The experience itself was killer. I mean it killed. Warren was really pleased. One of the reasons that Warren quit the Allman Brothers was to pursue Gov't Mule, but the situation was also stagnating: no new records, no new songs and the same set lists. Warren's all about new things all the time. That's what Mule's about. Their repertoire was hundreds and hundreds of songs and they were constantly adding in current hits and old hits and obscure stuff. That was a big part of Warren and Woody leaving. One of the things that the Allman Brothers mentioned in talking to Warren this time around was that they wanted him to write songs and change the setlists and sing more and that's what really happened. They brought back all of the songs he wrote on the first few albums, the two studio and two live records. He also wrote four new songs with Gregg Allman down in Savannah, which is great because I think Gregg's an amazing songwriter and Warren's one of the people I think he works best with, so it's a very fruitful relationship that they have. During the Beacon run, Warren sang about a third of the songs and that is what he wants. You know, Warren got to write the setlists every night and he changed everything around. It does look like Warren will be doing the summer tour and potentially the future as well.

JW: With the Allmans?

SS: Yeah.

JW: With all the Phil & Friends dates it sounds like he's going to be a busy man this summer It certainly seems like everyone wants to work with Warren these days.

SS: Well he works really, really hard. I feel like there's something big coming for him. I feel it right now. I feel it in the phone calls. I feel it in the response from people. I feel it in the ticket sales. I feel it in the merchandise. It's not going to be one thing that Warren does, but it's going to be the combination of things. He consistently puts out really beautiful songs and amazing music. Life Before Insanity won three major art awards, including one of the most prestigious for artwork. It may not be just that we're the featured music on the Sony 2001 NASCAR game or the fact that we're in a couple movie soundtracks, but he's going to continue to put out this music and all of these events are going to continue to happen. At some point, it's going to click and the whole world's gonna realize what an amazing talent he is.









Radiators performing at Warren Haynes and Stef Scamardo's wedding!

http://www.archive.org/details/rad1997-10-04.flac16

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 06:43 AM
http://www.realamericanstories.com/stefani-scamardo/?curpage=6

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 08:25 AM
I love this picture! So glad Debbie got a chance to hang with Stef and Warren at Jones beach. What a fun time. Lots of laughs!

 

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Universal Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 09:32 AM
Nice stuff here Sue! Gonna print out the article and read it on the way home tonight. Also, love the pic of their wedding party. Very very nice!

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 09:38 AM
She got my chip ?

 

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If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 11:48 AM
That's a real nice read Eileen.

Hey Jon!

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 11:56 AM
quote:
That's a real nice read Eileen.

Hey Jon!


Hey susea. The piece doesn't mention if she has my chip.

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 12:25 PM
Isn't there some history between her and Chris Robinson of the Crowes. I don't think Warren has jammed with them in awhile.

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 02:10 PM
God Bless Stefani Scamardo!!!!!! She along with fine people like Brian Farmer are just as responsible for bringing us the joy and magic as the band is. She not only works her butt off managing the Mule but is also loving and nurturing to Warren keeping him in a happy, rested and creative frame of mind. Their love and affection for each other is very obvious.

Thank you for everything you do for us Stef!!! Your hard work is very much appreciated!!!

[Edited on 9/10/2009 by sixty8]

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 03:16 PM
quote:
The piece doesn't mention if she has my chip.


I have a chip for you Jon. You choose - chocolate or potato

( LOL - I couldn't resist)

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 03:21 PM
I saw a link to this article last year and never read all the way through, thanks for posting the whole thing

Along with Stefani and all the folks at Hard Head thanks also have to go out to Paradigm Agency (their booking agency) for getting the music from city to city.

Oh hell I forgot to mention the road crew too.

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 04:14 PM


http://www.cherrylane.com/News/Guitar-Legend,-Vocalist-and-Songwriter-Warre n-Hayn.aspx

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 04:25 PM
"Art isnít about perfection. It is what is created when trying to reach perfection that matters!" - Stefani Scamardo

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 05:30 PM
Jon! LOL! I think Debbie has the chip for you!!

Cool quote Mitzi!

Nice to see everyone stopping in and showing some appreciation!

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 05:36 PM
quote:
Isn't there some history between her and Chris Robinson of the Crowes. I don't think Warren has jammed with them in awhile.

Not sure about that history you speak of.

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 05:42 PM
quote:
"Art isnít about perfection. It is what is created when trying to reach perfection that matters!" - Stefani Scamardo
Very cool! Great thread - love the interviews and pictures !

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 06:57 PM
Deleted what I had to say for perpetuity's sake. I am sure that it has been read by those who care by now. Don't like it, well there is an edit and delete button for a reason.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Here is a photo I have of Warren and Stef, which I think is rather excellent. From 2007. I thought it was taken at the big guitar conference they have, but maybe not. Not sure, but I thought it was great so I copied it for the web site I run, though I never uploaded it as the upload function on the Yahoo Groups it is so obsolete. Anyway, here it is.

Now you guys have a good portrait of them you can post around.






[Edited on 9/18/2009 by Angelemerald]

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:03 PM
quote:
quote:
"Art isnít about perfection. It is what is created when trying to reach perfection that matters!" - Stefani Scamardo
Very cool! Great thread - love the interviews and pictures !

Me too. The pictures add so much too. I can tell the one Mitzi put up is older. Love is in the air!

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:08 PM
quote:
Do you guys really think Stefani believes your poser posts? (Not all of you of course.) I may have criticized Stef in the past, but I never called her or thought of her as stupid. And you know, intelligence is one of the things I most highly prize. That and sincerity.

I think if push comes to shove Stef would rather people like me around her who says it how it is instead of saying one thing on line and stabbing you in the back through the other side of your mouth.

For example, how many back stage Mule passes have you gotten from Stef Sue? None. And where is your photo with Stef? Nowhere. And you've been "following" Warren since the late 80's right, Sue? I'm just pointing out your maneuverings and inconsistencies Sue. Just so you know I know.

Finally, while Stef and I aren't buddies by any means, we respect each other cause she knows I would never sell Warren down the river for some face time on an internet board, nor put anything out there about her that isn't respectful. And she also knows (as well as Warren and the band) that I have tried to help the Mule through it all, even if I have been critical of some of her management.

So really Sue, your bs is so transparent that it is laughable. And actually pretty nauseating. Cause you know it isn't about Stef, and you know it isn't about really caring for her but it is about you thinking you are getting back at me. And I think she is smart enough to know that. Why even if you get a photo of her and you in Jamaica, I am sure she knows exactly what it means.

But what you don't get is that the day you betrayed me and the follow up to it over the past year as well as all the bs you have posted these past few days, not being your fried is truly the prize. And it is becasue I know how you talk about other people behind their backs. So when you made friends with Deb after you and I were friends for a long time, and I knew the kind of person Deb was, it was pretty much a no brainer to ignore you, save for some polite chatter.

And moreover, your behavior in that other thread really speaks to what you are about, gathering all your three friends and other supporters to gang up against me when all I initially did was criticize a photo you posted that frankly is a horrible one of Warren. But like a person who shows her school yard antics, you will notice that most other people on the board are keeping out of it. Cause I am sure they know all about how you have bad mouthed me and made sure I wasn't invited to that Beacon gathering.

But you know, I don't engage in relationships that way. I have grown up in a city of 8.5 million people. If some group doesn't like me, well by george there are so many others. So I will see you in NH and Jamaica. Have a good day and make sure to bring your trusty camera so you can document the comings and going of the staff and band and crew. I am sure they will appreciate your reportage.


So sad.

[Edited on 9/11/2009 by greggswoman]

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:14 PM
quote:
Have you put the 40 you owe me in the mail yet? If you need my addy just let me know. I guess Sue doesn't have it any longer since you haven't said it is on its way. Thanks Mitzi.

quote:
quote:
Do you guys really think Stefani believes your poser posts? (Not all of you of course.) I may have criticized Stef in the past, but I never called her or thought of her as stupid. And you know, intelligence is one of the things I most highly prize. That and sincerity.

I think if push comes to shove Stef would rather people like me around her who says it how it is instead of saying one thing on line and stabbing you in the back through the other side of your mouth.

For example, how many back stage Mule passes have you gotten from Stef Sue? None. And where is your photo with Stef? Nowhere. And you've been "following" Warren since the late 80's right, Sue? I'm just pointing out your maneuverings and inconsistencies Sue. Just so you know I know.

Finally, while Stef and I aren't buddies by any means, we respect each other cause she knows I would never sell Warren down the river for some face time on an internet board, nor put anything out there about her that isn't respectful. And she also knows (as well as Warren and the band) that I have tried to help the Mule through it all, even if I have been critical of some of her management.

So really Sue, your bs is so transparent that it is laughable. And actually pretty nauseating. Cause you know it isn't about Stef, and you know it isn't about really caring for her but it is about you thinking you are getting back at me. And I think she is smart enough to know that. Why even if you get a photo of her and you in Jamaica, I am sure she knows exactly what it means.

But what you don't get is that the day you betrayed me and the follow up to it over the past year as well as all the bs you have posted these past few days, not being your fried is truly the prize. And it is becasue I know how you talk about other people behind their backs. So when you made friends with Deb after you and I were friends for a long time, and I knew the kind of person Deb was, it was pretty much a no brainer to ignore you, save for some polite chatter.

And moreover, your behavior in that other thread really speaks to what you are about, gathering all your three friends and other supporters to gang up against me when all I initially did was criticize a photo you posted that frankly is a horrible one of Warren. But like a person who shows her school yard antics, you will notice that most other people on the board are keeping out of it. Cause I am sure they know all about how you have bad mouthed me and made sure I wasn't invited to that Beacon gathering.

But you know, I don't engage in relationships that way. I have grown up in a city of 8.5 million people. If some group doesn't like me, well by george there are so many others. So I will see you in NH and Jamaica. Have a good day and make sure to bring your trusty camera so you can document the comings and going of the staff and band and crew. I am sure they will appreciate your reportage.


So sad.

[Edited on 9/11/2009 by greggswoman]



Pretty pathetic.

 

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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:15 PM
Check this out!! Stefani tells her "Real American Story".

http://www.realamericanstories.com/stefani-scamardo/?curpage=6

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:16 PM
quote:
Yeah I just send you my mailing address. Thanks for paying me back in advance.


Trust me. It's worth it.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:18 PM
quote:
Check this out!! Stefani tells her "Real American Story".

http://www.realamericanstories.com/stefani-scamardo/?curpage=6

Cool find!

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:19 PM
quote:
quote:
Check this out!! Stefani tells her "Real American Story".

http://www.realamericanstories.com/stefani-scamardo/?curpage=6

Cool find!

Great minds think alike!

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/10/2009 at 07:20 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
Check this out!! Stefani tells her "Real American Story".

http://www.realamericanstories.com/stefani-scamardo/?curpage=6

Cool find!

Great minds think alike!


ROFL!!!

 

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