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Author: Subject: Why there will never be another Woodstock

Peach Extraordinaire





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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:14 AM
There have been numerous debates and ideas as to why there will be another Woodstock. While reading a story in the paper this morning about the upcoming movie "Taking Woodstock", I think I read the most definitive reason. "Back in 1969, the kids were into everything except themselves. Today, the only thing the kids are into is themselves". I think this really hit the nail on the head, and also found it to be very sad. As long as the media continues to pollute young minds with "reality" shows and such and robbing childhood and youth of its innocence, future generations will find it impossible to enjoy the good times and simple fun most of us in this community were able to when we were young.
 
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World Class Peach



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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:28 AM
quote:
There have been numerous debates and ideas as to why there will be another Woodstock. While reading a story in the paper this morning about the upcoming movie "Taking Woodstock", I think I read the most definitive reason. "Back in 1969, the kids were into everything except themselves. Today, the only thing the kids are into is themselves". I think this really hit the nail on the head, and also found it to be very sad. As long as the media continues to pollute young minds with "reality" shows and such and robbing childhood and youth of its innocence, future generations will find it impossible to enjoy the good times and simple fun most of us in this community were able to when we were young.


Agree with you re: the kids, but the litiginous society we boomers have helped create/foster is the other reason. Think about what percentage of your income is devoted to insurance of some sort. No one could get the permits/pay the insurance on such an event. Imagine Jimi setting his guitar on fire in this day and age. (remember, Smoke on The Water was written after fireworks set fire to a concert hall that Zappa was playing at.)

When I was 17 if I got in a car with a drunken teen and ended up in a hospital the first thing my dad would have done as I awoke from a coma is smack me and yell at me. Now, there'd be a slew of lawyers waiting at my bedside.

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:48 AM
Woodstock was a very special event and musically I doubt it will ever be matched for sheer magnitude, classic performances and diversity of artists. But it continues in my opinion to over-glorified as a cultural event. derekfromcincinatti recently posted an interview with a very conservative newspaper reporter who was there, and not because he wanted to be. He unveiled some facts about Woodstock that to me anyway, somewhat de-mystified it. Such as: If it weren't for two very bright and dedicated engineers, many kids may have died at Woodstock or come away with life-threatening illnesses. Yasgur's farm was just that, a farm, and on a rainy weekend, hundreds of thousands of kids were sitting in wet cow sh*t. The guy who plumbed the place drilled six wells specifically for the event and ran miles of PVC piping so that concert goers could clean themselves. But his stroke of genius was treating the water with chlorine so that every kid who bathed was also disinfecting themselves. The electrician who wired the stage recognized the great danger posed by an outdoor show on a rainy weekend and went to great precautions to ensure that everything was properly grounded. The risk of electrocution and death would otherwise have been very real.

All I'm saying is that the efforts of ordinary, responsible individuals like those two have gotten lost over the years, and it got lost because they did their job so well and no one died. Meanwhile, musicians played, a bunch of hippies got zonked, and that's what made the film and the mythology.

[Edited on 8/23/2009 by robslob]

 

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World Class Peach



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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:57 AM
When I was in Woodstock, NY last august, they held a town hall type meeting / discussion with one of the "local leaders" of the town in 69 and one of the original promoters...

Thew questin came up about a 40th anniversary and it was noted that

(paraphrasing) "... probably many reunion type events will occur, BUT... we could never even imagine ever trying to recreate the same scenario or feeling that was behind the first Woodstock"

I plan to see the new movie, and hopefully enjoy it as much as I did the original movie.

But realistically, It won't be the same... no way, no how

still enjoyable, perhaps, but never the same
LOVE is all that remains the same, that's what it all comes down to

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 12:00 PM
Why there will never be another Woodstock

Liability & insurance

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 12:04 PM
quote:
Why there will never be another Woodstock

Liability & insurance


Michael Lang said " money"

(same thing ? )

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 12:15 PM
quote:
Why there will never be another Woodstock

Liability & insurance


I don't agree with this because concerts and festivals continue to be staged, this just adds to the paperwork and cost involved in putting on a show. The vibe is completely different. Was it the 20th or 25th anniversary show that riots broke out and concessions were burned?

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 12:20 PM
quote:
quote:
There have been numerous debates and ideas as to why there will be another Woodstock. While reading a story in the paper this morning about the upcoming movie "Taking Woodstock", I think I read the most definitive reason. "Back in 1969, the kids were into everything except themselves. Today, the only thing the kids are into is themselves". I think this really hit the nail on the head, and also found it to be very sad. As long as the media continues to pollute young minds with "reality" shows and such and robbing childhood and youth of its innocence, future generations will find it impossible to enjoy the good times and simple fun most of us in this community were able to when we were young.




Agree with you re: the kids, but the litiginous society we boomers have helped create/foster is the other reason. Think about what percentage of your income is devoted to insurance of some sort. No one could get the permits/pay the insurance on such an event. Imagine Jimi setting his guitar on fire in this day and age. (remember, Smoke on The Water was written after fireworks set fire to a concert hall that Zappa was playing at.)

When I was 17 if I got in a car with a drunken teen and ended up in a hospital the first thing my dad would have done as I awoke from a coma is smack me and yell at me. Now, there'd be a slew of lawyers waiting at my bedside.

We too, are part of the problem


Excellent point. When I got picked up by the cops back in the day the last thing I wanted was for them to bring me home to my parents, which is what they usually did. Today, it seems that many kids are incapable of being able to decide whether a choice is a good or bad one, and when they make a bad choice they are quick to blame someone else and refuse to be accountable and refuse to suffer the consequences with the help of their parents.

[Edited on 8/23/2009 by hankpipes]

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 01:26 PM
quick answer....NO....

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 02:30 PM
Because everything is about money and profit now. They didn't charge $5.00 for a bottle of water back then much less everything else they charge through the teeth for these days.

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 02:33 PM
I was a little too young to make it to Woodstock in 1969, but I wish I could have been there. Fortunately, by a short time later I was going to festivals and experiencing some of that buzz, that communal feeling as the incredible new music from those days was being released fresh and new almost weekly. At the same time, just as the hippies in San Fran held a funeral for the hippy in October of 1967, the Summer Of Love, because the original intent of the scene was being exploited even at that early date, what Woodstock did with its half a million attendees was to let folks know that the rock and roll of the day could be big business. Big bucks, and the corporate infleunce crept in at a bigger scale than before, more and more as time went on. By the mid-1970s, it was pretty much trashed. Progressive FM stations that were once free form and pushed the music forward from the late 60's on all of a sudden began to use playlists. What classic rockers that didn't die or OD'ed bent more towards a corporate approach as time went on, self destructed, and then by 1977 disco had reared its ugly head and the bars and clubs that once featured live bands all went to a DJ. That's when I turned to punk, ska, reggae and jazz. In a lot of ways, Woodstock was the beginning of the end of the scene.

As for these modern times, however, I have to partially disagree with this premise. On the bluegrass, newgrass, jamgrass, old time, Jerry-Garcia-Old-And-In-The-Way side of the music ledger, young folks are taking up instruments and playing like crazy and creating their own scene. I just spent ten days at the Appalachain String Band Festival (aka Clifftop) and was amazed yet again at how many young folks were playing instruments. Not strumming, but picking, young musicians that have been schooled in old time and bluegrass music yet listen to other current genres of music and are bringing new sounds and new perspectives to the table. I worked with Uncle Earl band (whose last album was produced by Led Zep's John Paul Jones) alumnus Rayna Gellert (new and fun solo projects coming from her soon) on a project about the Clifftop Festival and she described it this way to me, "There was a time a dozen years ago where I was like, 'Wow, this is lonesome. There are hardly any young people playing.' Then, within the past five or 10 years it has just exploded in a way that is amazing and thrilling. At the age of 15 at Clifftop, I never would have guessed that the scene would be like this." There were people there from 45 states and 7 countries, all there to meet and play tunes together in the camps, with worrying about being onstage and bringing attention to their selves being secondary. The spirit was right.

18-year old Sarah Jarosz is a perfect example as her new debut album "Song Up In My Head" is the CD of the year so far, that I've heard. She is a fan of Tony Rice and Garcia's bandmate in Old and In The Way - Vassar Clements, yet is also a fan of the Decemberists and Gnarls Barkley. She grew up in Austin, Texas and in about a week she will start school at the prestigious Berklee School of Music in Boston. These young folks have the communal attitude that was so apparent at Woodstock. I think a lot of it comes from the fact that they don't sit around and do nothing, but instead further their talent by picking up their respective instruments and playing together while being open to all kinds of music which was true in '69 as well. Sarah has a few songs from her new album streaming at her Myspace page, including an amazing instrumental called "Mans-in-need-of." It is hard to play and challenging, yet beautiful and majestic and modern. She plays three instruments, writes her own music and sings wonderfully, as can be heard in the cut "Song Up In My Head." http://www.myspace.com/sarahjaroszmusic.

Of course, there are other segments of the modern day youth that fit into the other category. But, there are some things happening with young folks if you look hard enough and have the same open mind that was such in vogue back in the late 1960's.

DH

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 02:45 PM
quote:
Damn phucked up KIDS.
Getting stressed about school starting back up?

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 02:48 PM
I suppose if you invite 200,000 plus people to come on up to a field in upstate New York, build a stage and book some popular acts, there is a chance that you got another Woodstock.

Many thought Woodstock 94 was supposed to be another Woodstock.
Many thought that Woodstock 99 was supposed to be another Woodstock.
Were they???


 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 06:43 PM
quote:
I suppose if you invite 200,000 plus people to come on up to a field in upstate New York, build a stage and book some popular acts, there is a chance that you got another Woodstock.

Many thought Woodstock 94 was supposed to be another Woodstock.
Many thought that Woodstock 99 was supposed to be another Woodstock.
Were they???





Not even close, IMO

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 06:52 PM
The word respect is why they will never have a huge show like WoodStock or Watkins Glen.......that many people and there would be rapes, fights and other nasty BS. I was at neither but went to large Dead shows in the early 70's. Nobody sat on my blanket, nobody sat in my seat, nobody danced and hit me in the face with their elbow and if they did they would say"sorry" The respect others show each other at shows has greatly diminished....

Than there is the idea of insurance....that prohibits folks trying

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 07:42 PM
Then again, Glastonbury seems to be pretty damn big.

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 07:48 PM
It's a different time, a different political climate. It seemed the last try at Woodstock was mostly kids trying to recreate the first one without the understanding of the mood of the country. And that's as it should be. Everything changes with time......kids will have their own 'woodstock' to remember in the context of their life experience. We all have ours.

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 08:22 PM
quote:
Then again, Glastonbury seems to be pretty damn big.


In England and Europe the Isle of Wight Festival has always been a celebrated event. There were festivals in 1968 and 1969. Most prominently was the 1970 festival which had an attendance of approximately 600,000 and featured such acts as Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Doors, Jethro Tull, Emerson Lake & Palmer, The Moody Blues, Richie Havens, John Sebastian, Miles Davis, and Ten Years After, etc. The 1970 festival is still talked about quite a bit, and continues to be the feature of many films, CDs, and books. Leonard Cohen's set is going to be releasedo on DVD and CD in October

The Isle of Wight Festival is going strong for the last couple of years and from what I read, they are trying to make the 2010 festival the biggest yet.

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 08:30 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
There have been numerous debates and ideas as to why there will be another Woodstock. While reading a story in the paper this morning about the upcoming movie "Taking Woodstock", I think I read the most definitive reason. "Back in 1969, the kids were into everything except themselves. Today, the only thing the kids are into is themselves". I think this really hit the nail on the head, and also found it to be very sad. As long as the media continues to pollute young minds with "reality" shows and such and robbing childhood and youth of its innocence, future generations will find it impossible to enjoy the good times and simple fun most of us in this community were able to when we were young.


I do, however, blame this on us parents. I too feared my dad more than the law or the principal at schoo. We have never instilled this fear in our kids - trying too hard to be understanding parents. But, society has also changed. I have a friend whose 15 year old son got brought home by the cops. My friend asked him for his computer; the kid said he didn't know where it was hidden. When my friend found it he shattered it. The kid (larger by far than my friend) went after his dad. The dad restrained him (didn't hit him) the kkid called the police and my friend almost got arrested. WHAT HAS THIS WORLD COME TO?

Enjoy the beach Hank. Sorry we didn't get to speak at the 3/26 show. is your son going? Unfortunately I booked a trip to Montauk before the show was announced



Agree with you re: the kids, but the litiginous society we boomers have helped create/foster is the other reason. Think about what percentage of your income is devoted to insurance of some sort. No one could get the permits/pay the insurance on such an event. Imagine Jimi setting his guitar on fire in this day and age. (remember, Smoke on The Water was written after fireworks set fire to a concert hall that Zappa was playing at.)

When I was 17 if I got in a car with a drunken teen and ended up in a hospital the first thing my dad would have done as I awoke from a coma is smack me and yell at me. Now, there'd be a slew of lawyers waiting at my bedside.

We too, are part of the problem


Excellent point. When I got picked up by the cops back in the day the last thing I wanted was for them to bring me home to my parents, which is what they usually did. Today, it seems that many kids are incapable of being able to decide whether a choice is a good or bad one, and when they make a bad choice they are quick to blame someone else and refuse to be accountable and refuse to suffer the consequences with the help of their parents.

[Edited on 8/23/2009 by hankpipes]

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 09:03 PM
quote:
The word respect is why they will never have a huge show like WoodStock or Watkins Glen.......that many people and there would be rapes, fights and other nasty BS. I was at neither but went to large Dead shows in the early 70's. Nobody sat on my blanket, nobody sat in my seat, nobody danced and hit me in the face with their elbow and if they did they would say"sorry" The respect others show each other at shows has greatly diminished....

Than there is the idea of insurance....that prohibits folks trying

I try to be respectful at shows like moving a little so people behind me can see. Saying soory if I bump into someone etc I thought that was good ediquite

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:36 PM
Could you imagine any group of people putting on something like this TODAY, just throwing up their hands and saying...

"Oh, what the heck...lets just make it FREE!!"

Times have changed...GREATLY for the worse.

 

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  posted on 8/23/2009 at 11:43 PM
Evidently there was a bit of a litigeous society even back then. I read there were about eighty lawsuits filed against the organizers....including at least one farmer who sued because his cows didn't give milk for a week.

 

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  posted on 8/24/2009 at 07:31 AM
Just in my own thinking and being from that time... you just can not repeat ANY firsts.. It was the cool and hip thing for the summer of 69'.. which evolved from the summer of 67' LOVE and 68' Monterey Pop Festival.... it was all the same period of time ... lots going on in our country then, war, internal wars and revolution, space programs, walking on the moon, women's movement, civil rights , environmental issues were beginning to make a big impact, assassinations, freedom, drugs, drugs , drugs, and the best music laid on our ears .... and alot coming out from our own country, which we needed from all the British invasions, man, we had The Allman Brothers Blues Band on the rise...
Woodstock was about the people , the unity that was felt for one another then and lets never confuse anything about this... it was about the $ money $ too, we were and somewhat resistant and still a capitalistic country, it's always about the money .. they needed, wanted it , had to have it, until finally the crowd was so overwhelming about getting into the field.. the promoters just let it go... Their mindset was to be cool , have a brotherhood and sisterhood, and let the party begin. They were ready to take their loses for a great time. That would never happen today... they would be back to beating people and arresting them if they tore down the fence's to get it today... The groove and feeling of the 60's is long gone , just as the date is.
The kids from that time period had spunk, a wisdom not about themselves, and a place of peace in their hearts... it was a time for huge changes and lots of them happened in those yrs... It's fun looking back at those days..
Peace and Love to all..... throwing flowers out to you.....

Oh well ..back to the corporate world of greed and making money to survive.... although that has changed drastically in the last 8 months.... I wonder what will be next ???

 

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  posted on 8/24/2009 at 05:00 PM
With todayís Consumer oriented youth. You would have to have a wall 300 yards long of cell phone charging stations.
But its not all kids fault, itís also the litigious society that does not allow a kid to get on a dam bicycle without a helmet. It has gotten ridiculous.

It is a different time and place.

 

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  posted on 8/24/2009 at 05:55 PM
I went to Woodstock 94 and had a great time.
I'm also in my 40's and raising my 3 boys ages 10-14
and times have certainly changed from when I was young.
but I'm always telling them to stay a kid as long as they can
because once they start dealing with adult situations,
the consequences of bad choices can last a lifetime.
I do feel there can be another Woodstock.

 
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