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Author: Subject: Music Star Gives Back to Community - Warren

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 04:00 PM
Cool, this was on CNN.

ASHEVILLE, North Carolina (CNN) -- In 1988, a relatively unknown rock and blues guitarist named Warren Haynes got some of his friends together to play music in Asheville, North Carolina. It was just an opportunity for local musicians to jam during the holidays, the one time of year they were all in town together.


Warren Haynes' good work has been noted by the street named after him.

1 of 2 The artists also wanted to give back to the community, so they gave the money raised by their show to various charities.

The tradition has continued. Now celebrating its 20th anniversary, Haynes' Christmas Jam has evolved into an epic annual event for the musicians, fans, and particularly Habitat for Humanity.

"We need Habitat For Humanity more now than ever, with the whole mortgage crisis that put us where we are now, and the fact that Habitat is about building homes for people that can't afford homes as opposed to lending money to people who can't afford homes," Haynes told CNN.

Haynes and his wife Stefani decided to donate 100 percent of the Christmas Jam proceeds to Habitat for Humanity years ago because they could see exactly where the money was going. They go back each year and meet the families they helped build homes for.

Singer Joan Osborne echoed Haynes' thoughts. "It's a scary time. A lot of people are losing their homes so its good to be able to do something that helps with that specific problem," she said.

Going into 2008's shows, which were held December 12 and 13, the Christmas Jam had raised more than $665,000 for Asheville's Habitat For Humanity. The money has gone into building 12 houses in Enka Hills, a wooded community surrounded by mountains on a street the organization appropriately named Warren Haynes Drive. (In 2005 Habitat also built a house in the New Orleans Musicians Village.)

The Thursday before the show, Haynes presented the key to a new home to single mother Suzie Cromer and her 8-year-old daughter.

"Meeting the families and seeing the work that Habitat's doing with our help -- you know its hard to see that and not get emotional," Haynes said.

"Warren is a hero in our mind," said Habitat's Arianne Kjellquist. "In western North Carolina, the housing costs are really out of whack with what the local wages are, so there's a big discrepency there. There are more people that maybe would have been approved previously when the lending standards weren't so strict."

This year's Christmas Jam lived up to the long-lasting and crowd-pleasing traditions of previous shows. The first night's show ran more than nine hours, ending with an Allman Brothers set after 4 a.m. The second night's show ended at 3:30 a.m. Performers included Ben Harper and Relentless 7, Travis Tritt, Michael Franti, Osborne, Ivan Neville's Dumpstaphunk, Steve Earle and Haynes' band Gov't Mule.

Perhaps the most anticipated addition this year among both fans and artists was former Led Zeppelin member John Paul Jones, who played acoustic mandolin, bass and keyboards throughout the weekend with just about everyone. Jones said he was happy to pitch in.

"In the economic climate like this, people really just want to get out and enjoy themselves and forget about the day to day stuff that they have to deal with. So it works on many levels," Jones said. "The fact that is for a good cause is just a huge bonus."

Haynes says the 20-year evolution of the Christmas Jam reflects his career. "We've grown up together. Its a parallel of the progress that I have achieved, and the event reflects not only the philosophy I share with these people but the mission."

And as fans danced the night away while the artists played their hearts out, families' dreams of owning their perfect home come true.

"I would have never imagined or dreamed that it would turn into what its turned into," Haynes reflected with a huge smile.

 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 04:08 PM
Very cool article - thanks for posting jim. Bless Warren Haynes and his work with HFH - I'm happy to see him recognized for this wonderful thing he does.

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 06:53 PM
great article

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 09:12 PM
Dec. 24, 2008
Gov't Mule: The Essential Rock ‘N’ Rollers
by: Martin Halo


Warren Haynes is all over the place—in the best of ways. Haynes sits as a fixture to Gregg Allman’s left since 1990 in the Allman Brothers Band, he was a once touring member of the Grateful Dead after the passing of Jerry Garcia, and resides a guitarist who has a room just for Jammy Awards. It all went down while Haynes was continuing to forge his own envelope with Gov’t Mule. In the midst of the exhausting schedule and the ever increasing musical bank in the hands from the muse, Haynes continued to evolve creatively.

With rumors moistening that Haynes will be joining the Grateful Dead for their 2009 reunion—they remain just that— rumors. Relix Magazine will be confirming the official details as their February cover story. But by all preliminary accounts Haynes will be logging in more time than ever with the Allman Brothers Band after the New Year in celebration of their 40th anniversary. We had the chance to catch up with Haynes while he was in New York City, preparing for a NYE Gov’t Mule run at Hammerstein Ballroom and two acoustic gigs at the Angel Orensanz Church on the Lower East Side.

The approach this time around was simple. The agenda reflected pin pointing the elements of essential American rock ‘n’ roll directly from the flap of one of the genres most revered players.

Do you feel you have to be starving as a musician at some point to earn credibility?

I think most musicians spend part of their lives broke. Financially speaking, whether it is a necessity to have integrity or not, I really don’t know.

Do you think a musician not having money shows their true character and the intentions of their passions?

I think art in general tends to demand sacrifice. The more sacrifices you make the more of your own passions you are sinking into your art.

Why would you think an artist who molds himself to fit a popular trend would be acting adversely in the face of art?

It depends on what your mission is. The more an artist chases commerce the less of an artist that person becomes. But, none of us live in a vacuum. The concept of creating a painting and then burning it because you don’t want anyone to see it is long outdated. It is each individual’s line to draw. The line of how much they will sacrifice their own art to reach more of an audience. I do tend to think these days people second guess the audience too much. They try to adhere to what they think the audience demands. I think art suffers in general because of that, but that is my own personal opinion.

The foundation of the allure of rock ‘n’ roll is built upon myth—all the way back to Robert Johnson meeting the Devil. With the rise of the age of information, and increasing rock voyeurism do you still feel there is a place for myth in rock ‘n’ roll?

It wouldn’t appear that way at the moment, but things move in cycles. I think when people are tired of where the cycle is right now, there will eventually be a big back lash. A lot of elements and aspects from the opposite side will tend to come back into play.

The last time we spoke—you told me that you saw art actually moving towards integrity-based artists? Do you still feel that way?

What I see is something that reflects our culture in general, especially if you are speaking American culture. If you look politically in America we have eliminated the middle class. Rich people on one extreme and poor people on the other extreme. There is no longer a middle class. I think art in the music world kind of reflects that. On one end you have pop —American Idol-type music that people wind up spending millions and millions of dollars recording and promoting. The major labels, who are still convinced they are right, are grasping at straws and are trying to figure out a way to maintain their strong hold over the world. And then on the other hand you have just working musicians and artists, and songwriters, and bands, wanting to reach their own audience but not wanting to sell their souls to do it.

If somebody said to you that rock ‘n’ roll is struggling to achieve your goals without compromising the ideals set by your artistic foundation, would that be an accurate statement?

Yes. Obviously that is one way of putting it. I agree with it. I think real rock ‘n’ roll is being made by people that are moved to make that music. It is an expression of who you are. People’s different interpretations and variations of what that is vary on age and where they grew up. How their first major experience of being turned on to something moved them. It is a rebellious spirit. It is going against the grain of society, but not without purpose. It has its own purpose. People know when they are moved by something and I think part of the problem today where people feel as though they are getting ripped off with art culture—whether it is music, movies, books—is that when people compromise their own artistic integrity to second guess a market place then the art itself suffers. You wind up over looking the Otis Reddings, the Ray Charles, and the Aretha Franklins of the world because they are coming from a different place.

What about if I said, it wouldn’t be rock ‘n’ roll if at one point there was no struggle?

That is one theory but everybody has their own struggles. Some people may not be struggling in obvious ways but they are struggling in other ways, in some cases more than any of us. Fighting the good fight is not always about being broke. I am sure there are a lot of musicians who are fighting more demons after they have achieved success then they are before. You theory is a valid one but I don’t think it could universally apply.

Marc Ford, ex-guitarist of the Black Crowes, said something to me the other week that no musician has ever directed towards me before. He said, ‘At one point I felt that all of my creativity was wrapped up in drugs and that without drugs I was scared of not being creative.’ Is that something you struggle with as well, the fear of not being creative?

I think everybody feels that from time to time and what brings it back is some sort of obstacle that you have to overcome. Or some struggle that you have to base it on or continue. I think we are kind of getting diverted, because now we are talking about songwriting. As a songwriter I think most songwriters write their best songs when they are going through some really hard times. That doesn’t have to be financially, it could be emotionally, it could be physically, it could be spiritually, it could be whatever suffering you are going through at the moment. When songwriters are happy then that can turn to complacency. How much of your search or quest is for happiness and how much is to write the best song you can write.

It has been two years since Gov’t Mule released High And Mighty. It is getting about time for a follow-up. Are plans on the books?

We have recorded about half of a record and we are going to go back in the studio early next year and start working on the rest of it.

Do you have an idea of how it will sound?

I think it’s definitely going to be a rock ‘n’ roll record but different from High And Mighty in a way that some of the songs were written and recorded for the High And Mighty sessions but we felt like they sounded like a different record. So, they didn’t feel like they fit on that record, but is all stuff that we were really happy with the way it turned out. In a lot of way we feel as if we made the complete High And Mighty record and the beginnings of the next record. Now we have to just connect the dots and see what this next record is going to be.

There are some different melodic structures and different approaches but we like every record to be different from the one before it. It is to early for me to know exactly what it is going to be like but the stuff that we have recorded so far doesn’t really sound like anything we have done in the past. There is stuff where Danny and I both play guitar. There is stuff where there are no keyboards. There is some stuff where there are acoustic guitars and electric guitars. And then with our new bass player, who is a rocker, I think his personality is going to help influence of the new record as well.

Gov’t Mule will be performing at Hammerstein Ballroom in NYC on Dec. 30 and 31. For more information on Warren Haynes and Gov’t Mule you can visit their homepage at mule.net.

http://www.theaquarian.com/artistfeatures.php?aid=625

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 09:51 PM
warren has seemed to open up more the past 10 weeks

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 09:58 PM
True Tarzan, in the last few weeks at least.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Re: Gov't Mule: The Essential Rock ‘N’ Rollers

> Marc Ford, ex-guitarist of the Black Crowes, said something to me
the other week that no musician has ever directed towards me before.
He said, `At one point I felt that all of my creativity was wrapped up
in drugs and that without drugs I was scared of not being creative.'
Is that something you struggle with as well, the fear of not being
creative?

I think everybody feels that from time to time and what brings it back
is some sort of obstacle that you have to overcome. Or some struggle
that you have to base it on or continue. I think we are kind of
getting diverted, because now we are talking about songwriting. As a
songwriter I think most songwriters write their best songs when they
> are going through some really hard times. That doesn't have to be
> financially, it could be emotionally, it could be physically, it
could be spiritually, it could be whatever suffering you are going
through at the moment. When songwriters are happy then that can turn
to complacency. How much of your search or quest is for happiness and
how much is to write the best song you can write.


I think Warren side stepped the question. Here's my thoughts on the matter:

Drugs and creativity can be so intertwined in popular culture.
Especially in the rock and roll culture. Where there is fear that you
can no longer be creative, there is the possibility of getting too
involved in drug use. An artist, from my perspective of not being
one, is a person who has demands on them in terms of out put. Yet the
very act of creativity is something that requires no pressure. How
can someone write when they are being pressured to write? Sure
students can, maybe, but seasoned professionals, people who write
music and lyrics, people who write for a living? If they have been at
all successful, the telescope can get tightened on them, which is
antithetical to the very act of creating. Creating requires going
inward and the pressure to create successful output is a natural block
in that process. That pressure alone by its very nature is something
that inhibits creativity.

Drugs of course give people the sense that they can go deeper, and
maybe some drugs even do allow you to get deeper into your
consciousness or into your heart, but really, the creativity is there
and maybe the drugs seem to open the door, but most likely the drug
just removed the anxiety about being creative, instead of "making" one
"be" more creative.

I've read a lot of Bob Dylan the past year or so. He had periods of
stronger creativity and weaker creativity. I'm sure some of his songs
were "enhanced" by the drug experience, but that fluctuation of
creativity is just the normal cycle of creativity. I think there is a
video of Neil Young talking about Bob Dylan (and himself) and
reflecting on the whole ebb and flow of creativity. Creativity isn't
something that you can turn off and on. It either happens becasue
everything in your life is supporting creativity, or it doesn't happen
because the person is supporting everything else besides creativity.

Like anything that is elusive, it needs the right environment of
support to grow.


 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 10:20 PM
I think he dodges the issues of substance
because he doesnt wanna come off as being judgemental
to people that have had issues with it

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 10:33 PM
Warren is The Man.


Period.





Too bad more folks don't know it.

 

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  posted on 12/23/2008 at 10:47 PM
quote:
Warren is The Man.


Period.





Too bad more folks don't know it.

they know they just cant except he is the man
and they arnt

 

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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 12/24/2008 at 01:20 AM
great article - thanks for posting.

.. i'll say it again: Warren Haynes, a classic inspirational human-being.

 

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  posted on 12/24/2008 at 02:19 AM
Very few artists have given as much as Warren. Be it charity, his time in performance, his opinions, etc. He is the most giving performer I have ever seen. That comes from him not letting it all go to his head like many others. I like the fact he stays grounded, and is in touch with his fans. Yes, Warren IS the man in my book too.

 

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