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Author: Subject: Goose Creek Symphony is what music is all about

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 01:20 PM
After losing Bill Ector last week, Patti and I decided that some good-time music was just what we needed to get us out of our funk, so we packed the car Friday and headed to Asheville, NC to meet friends and hear Goose Creek Symphony.The only way to explain a Goose Creek show is that it is a musical phenomenon that hasn't changed since I last saw the band at the Atlanta Pop Festival in 1970. It will not be thirty-eight years before I see them again...I promise you that!

About 2pm on Saturday afternoon we stopped by the Asheville Fairgrounds, to sample a great plate of ribs, and listened to a bluegrass band in a beautiful lush mountain setting. Goose Creek was booked to play last during the annual Asheville Ribfest. Sadly there wasn't much of a crowd early on, and it was unusually hot for the mountains, so we finished our lunch, had a beer, got the lay of the land, and went back to the hotel to meet friends and wait to see what the evening held.

When we returned to the fairgrounds at 8pm and the whole place was a madhouse...lines 100 yards long at all the food booths (except for the poor guy selling Oriental Ribs), and literally thousands of hippies of all ages, and persuasions greeting friends and family. There was also a good healthy dose of crew-cut rednecks, a few genuine Hillbilly's, and a few Khaki-clad, good old boys waiting for Goose Creek to come on at 9:30. Every time the band that proceeded Goose Creek mentioned their name, and roar came up over the whole Fairground. You can only imagine what was going through the guys mind that was trying to sell Oriental Ribs! I don't think that anyone had a clue that such a mammoth crowd would show up; not the promoters, certainly not the venders, and probably not even the band, but maybe, just maybe, the band did.

When the warm-up band was finished, Goose Creek set up quickly, did a cursory sound check, filed off the stage, and then abruptly turned about-face, and walked straight back up on stage, and started an incredible two and a half hour set. That's when all hell broke loose. The crowd went nuts, then the band went nuts, then the guy making corn dogs went nuts, then the lady selling beer went nuts, even the poor guy trying to sell Oriental Ribs went nuts, I went nuts, and I'm pretty sure that the guy taking money went nuts, and I know that the promoter went nuts.

It was impossible to tell who was having more fun, the band, or the flock of Goose Heads dancing 180 degrees around the stage through a thick cloud of incense. About half-way through the show I finally gave up trying to shoot photo's because I couldn't stop boogying, and consequently, I couldn't keep my camera from shaking long enough to get a shot. The band danced, jammed, boogied, and basically blew the top off the mountain, and the audience returned their energy, which, boosted the bands energy, dominoing, and leapfrogging, one feeding off the other. I've really haven't seen anything like it since Atlanta Pop. Matter of fact, Goose Creek Symphony's music reminded me very much of a mini-Atlanta Pop Festival, in a time warp. Not much about the band or their music had changed except that they had gotten better!

After their two and a half hour set, the band came back for a twenty minute encore that started with the Beatles, "Here Comes The Sun," and then bobbed and weaved back-and-forth between, country, bluegrass, blues, Americana, Hillbilly, and rock-n-roll. When that was over, the general consciences was that the band, and the audience had given it all they could, which meant it was over, and time to go home! Everyone was spent.

Looking around after the show, it was obvious that there was a total lack of security at the fairgrounds. What security they started with probably melted into the audience, and who could blame them? A funny thing happened. The fifty or so fans that wondered backstage, formed a very orderly line outside of the "band tent" and patiently waited for Charlie Gearheart and the rest of the guys to catch their breath, and get a drink. There was no yelling, no pushing, no fighting, no arguing, just fans quietly waiting to thank their band for one hell of a great show, and to have a shirt, CD, or old album signed. It was all very warm, civilized, and very Southern.

I waited till most of the fans were gone to have a word or two with Charlie, their tour manager, and the rest of the band and family. All nice as the day is long. What a wonderful night in the mountains. We drove nine hours up, and nine back, and I'd do it again tomorrow for a show like that. I guess to some that makes us a little off kilter, but I honestly think that I took something important away from the Goose Creek performance in Ashville that will make me a better person going into next week. Really, isn't that what it's all about?

Bill
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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 01:33 PM
Bill wrote a great review of Goose Creek's latest album for the upcoming "Hittin' the Note," due out in late August - GCS is the real deal
JL

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 01:48 PM
Great news. I loved Goose Creek back when I was in school. Some great music. I hope they are touring around, because you made me wish I was there this weekend. And I was thru Asheville this past weekend and didn't know it was even happening. Funny how you miss some of this stuff.

My son and I headed up to the Nantahala river. Where we met up with Brock who is on this site too. No mention of it while we were camping. Had a great trip too. The river sure was nice to us. Except for a rivers end dump it gave Brock.


Very nice review, I felt like I was there while reading it. Sure sounded like a great time

[Edited on 7/14/2008 by rottinpeach]

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 01:56 PM
I saw GCS a few times back in the day, and it was always a fun time.

I've been on the Nantahala a few times, and that is always a fun time, too.

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 02:17 PM
Goose Creek is touring this summer in support of a new "old" recording that they recently found that was recorded in 1973 just before they took a fifteen year fly fishing hiatus. They sound better today than they did in the 70s, and if you get a chance to see them this summer, I'd highly suggest it. Goose Creek is right beside the Brothers in the way that they can pull out that good-time vibe. Absolutely amazing.

BTW, all their CD's are available on their website, as well as their tour schedule...

http://www.goosecreeksymphony.com/

Bill
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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 03:15 PM
Glad to hear the Goose is Loose. Great band, but don't seem to tour all that much. Just a few shows here and there.
 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 03:29 PM

Back in the early '70s Goose Creek lived in Atlanta and I got to hang out with the guys a bit. I even booked them for a show at Georgia Tech once. Unfortunately, I haven't seen them since! They always made everyone at their shows feel GOOD. What a great band!

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 04:07 PM
Excellent report, Bill. Good to see the Goosers rolling. A whole lot of music floating around Asheville. Do you remember the name of the bluegrass band you saw??

DH

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 04:22 PM
A local Asheville group, The Carburetors, played just before Goose Creek, and were very good. I think that the band that we caught in the afternoon was called Gigi Dover & The Big Love. Another good band.

Bill
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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 04:34 PM
Glad to hear the Goose is on tour. They have quite a following back in the hills.
 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 04:41 PM
Great review, Bill!!! Makes me wish I was amongst that flock of 180 degree dancing Goose Heads!

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 05:07 PM
quote:

Back in the early '70s Goose Creek lived in Atlanta and I got to hang out with the guys a bit. I even booked them for a show at Georgia Tech once. Unfortunately, I haven't seen them since! They always made everyone at their shows feel GOOD. What a great band!


Ron, do you remember a band back then called Duck Butter? We used to get a music show out of Atlanta (around 1970. Music Explosion?) that I saw Eric Quincy Tate on for the first time, and also this band Duck Butter. The had a song that I believe was called Hoady Toad and Billy Frog.

I think I also saw Goose Creek on that show.

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 05:17 PM

I was buddies with the Eric Quincy Tate boys, even sitting in the studio with them for one recording session. But Duck Butter really doesn't ring a bell!

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 06:33 PM
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Glad to hear the Goose is on tour. They have quite a following back in the hills.



That's because band leader Charles Gearhart is from near up home in eastern Kentucky where the real Goose Creek runs through the Appalachians. By the way, Goose Creek holler where Charles grew up is not to be confused with the town of Goose Creek along the Ohio River near Louisville. Goose Creek holler is south of my home town of Huntington, WV and just below Prestonsburg near hwere all kinds of famous musicians came from around Route 23.

Here is a story from Charles about growing up in Appalachia;

quote:
When our website was being created I volunteered to write fish stories for the site. All my friends and many fans know how much I like to spend time with the fish and on the water. So for this first story I thought I may as well start at the beginning. Also, these stories may not be written in a sequence from the beginning to the present, but only as I can reflect on them. May we all learn to have respect for the fish and all living things.

Long ago and far away, deep in the Appalachian hills of southeast Kentucky, I was born and raised in a hollow called Goose Creek. I was delivered and given birth at my Grand-ma and Grand-paw's house by Mrs. Amy Bagley, the lady who became my first-grade teacher, and I think, taught everyone in this area their first year in school.

In those days, this area was very remote, with our family still living somewhat on the barter system. I remember going to town on the week-ends with my Aunts and Uncles to trade eggs, milk and etc. for sugar, flour and etc.

We had no electricity or running water or any convenience of the city. As I remember it, my relatives worked hard, went to bed early, and life was quite simple as compared with life today.

Now you may say, this doesn't sound like a story about fishing! Well it's not! It's a lifetime with the fish. My life! I have spent as much time fishing (maybe more), as I have with music.

I think the first thing in my life with the fish that I can remember, was when one of my older cousins came up the lane with some Chub Minners (Minnows), that he had caught with a hook, string, and a willow branch, down in Goose Creek. As I looked at them I was in awe. As I think back now I can remember some kind of special feeling, but no way can I explain it. Maybe more than Awe, maybe Great, Wow, Caught them! How? It was something new to me, And I was very intrigued. I was about four years old.

The next encounter that I can remember was being at the creek down behind Ray McComas's barn. I was with someone (but can't remember who), and we were either trying to catch minners with our hands, or were just watching them in the little pool in Goose Creek.

Goose Creek was very small, only about 1-2 miles long. I know we didn't get any fish that day, because the next time I went, I got "hooked."

This time we (maybe cousin Joe but I but can't remember who else) went down the road to Charlie Allen's home place. We crossed the small field to a much larger pool on Goose Creek.

I was fishing with a willow branch, a piece of string and a pin, bent in the shape of a hook and tied to the string. I was fishing with a piece of worm on my bent pin. If I can remember right, I think I missed a Chub Minner or two. Then I caught one. Don't ask me what happened after that (I was so excited) but I hope I released the fish. But doubt that I did.

After that my parents moved to Eastern (small community) down on Beaver Creek. It was a much larger creek and had real fish in it, not just minners. Our house was on the creek bank up on a hill, but close to the creek. Just below the house was a spot where a lot of local men fished, and not with willow branches either, but with long yellow cane poles.

One day my parents allowed me to go down and fish for awhile with the men. I'm sure they had agreed with my parents to keep an eye on me (I was 5 or 6 years old). I fished with the men for a little while and watched them catch a few fish. I think mostly Sundabs (Sunfish) and maybe a small catfish or two. I would look around at the men fishing and I felt special, just getting to fish with the men.

After a while they asked me to go up to my house and get them some water to drink. I took off for the house, got the water, and when I got back and gave them the water, they told me my fishing pole was jerking while I was gone. They said I should check it because there could be a fish on it. I lifted the pole and there was really and truly a real fish on my bent pin. I grabbed the fish and flew for home to show the fish to my parents.

You're right! It was years before I realized what really happened. Those men must have laughed so hard they filled their pants full of that water they drank. I want to thank those men for what they gave me, a beginning with the fish.

Well anyway...that's how I remember it beginning.

Now if I only had a cane pole, real fishing line, fish hooks, and some of that lead for sinkers. What more in life could I want.

- Charles Gearhart


 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 07:00 PM
Thanks for pointing that out, but I was aware of Charles Gearhart being from Floyd county, KY long ago. You ever fish Paintsville Lake? I used to go to Yatesville outside of Louisa alot, but never drove on down to Paintsville to fish. I heard that lake has some really deep water.
Sorry, my mind is on fishing right now.

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 07:04 PM
quote:

I was buddies with the Eric Quincy Tate boys, even sitting in the studio with them for one recording session. But Duck Butter really doesn't ring a bell!


I don't know why I even remember them, but they had that one hokey song.

I really liked EQT. I even went to the 20th anniversary show they did in the late 90s.

My favorite venue to see them was Grant's Lounge, with multiple pitchers of cold draft beer.

 

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  posted on 7/14/2008 at 10:59 PM
Not long after the recording of most of an album in 1973, Charlie and the band took a few years (about 15) off from the music business, and he moved up to Washington State to fish for Steelhead trout. Charlie guided a bit, had a fly fishing store up there, and invented Steelhead fly's for a living, near the town of Oso, Washington. When the band started getting back together to play, they recorded an album in the 90s called Oso Special, which is named after a fly that Charlie invented.

The man is very extremely interesting, and after listening to his music all these years, and formulating an idea of what the man was probably like from his lyrical philosophy, it was gratifying to find out he's pretty much the way I had expected that he would be...just Charlie Gearheart...musician, fisherman, husband, father, stewart of the earth, guardian of his own back yard, and all around good guy.

Do yourself a favor and get Goosed...

Bill
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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 06:51 AM
Great review Bill.

Was privlideged to be at this show, was expecting a good show.... got a great show.

Probably the best show I have seen since the 1970's. The energy was fantastic!

 

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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 09:19 AM
Hey Don,
It was great to see and spend some time with you and Liz. Music like Goose Creek needs to be shared and I felt like everyone in the audience was sharing someting with someone.
:-)
Bill

 

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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 11:28 AM
quote:
Thanks for pointing that out, but I was aware of Charles Gearhart being from Floyd county, KY long ago. You ever fish Paintsville Lake? I used to go to Yatesville outside of Louisa alot, but never drove on down to Paintsville to fish. I heard that lake has some really deep water.
Sorry, my mind is on fishing right now.



You know what, Bro, I haven't fished anywhere in that corner of Kentucky. I'm either heading to Cave Run lake in Morehead to cast for some toothie critters, walking the Red River in the gorge area, or heading across to West Virginia to fish the New River or Summersville Lake and Lake Stephens near my grandpa's holler. Somewhere down there along the Tennessee border is a cool gorge in southern Kentucky that also features a huge Eastern Chestnut tree that somehow survived the blight that wiped out the rest of the Eastern Chestnut trees in the early part of the 1990's. I saw a show on it on KET on, I believe, the Kentucky Life program.

quote:
A very rare find in 1999 on a Kentucky cattle farm could lead to the propagation of a blight-resistant American Chestnut reports the Louisville Courier-Journal. This 80 year old Adair County, Kentucky, chestnut tree miraculously survived the blight that decimated American chestnuts throughout eastern forests.

It should be mentioned that the tree does show signs of blight attack. It did not escape the Cryphonectria parasitica fungus completely but is proving to be highly resistant. The tree find is rare because of its survival within the natural range of the chestnut and blight infections. There are mature American chestnut trees growing in states outside the tree's natural range including Michigan, Wisconsin, Oregon and Washington but they have not seen the blight. Seeds are being collected from the Adair County tree. This fruit has been pollinated by genetic stock from The American Chestnut Foundation nurseries in Virginia and lately by local Kentucky pollen. Foresters will take three year-old trees and infect them with the blight to check for resistance.

The American chestnut was once the giant of the eastern forest; some were eight to 10 feet across at ground level and towered to more than 100 feet. Around 1900, an Asian blight ripped through the chestnut population and by the 1950s nearly all the trees were dead or dying. For reasons that still are little understood, a handful out of the billions survived, including one in Adair County. In this segment, viewers join Dave in a bucket truck to see how the American Chestnut Foundation is studying this old giant and trying to breed blight resistance in new generations of trees.

.....To help supply the breeding program with pure strains of the American chestnut, members of the Foundationís Kentucky chapter actively search for trees old enough to produce flowers. Members have discovered a handful of survivors in Adair, Clinton, Letcher, Lewis, Marshall, Menifee and Wayne counties.

Access to these trees can be challenging and is only possible due to the generosity of private landowners.

The next generation

Although male and female flowers occur on each tree, individual American chestnut trees by themselves rarely produce viable nuts. Chestnut trees do not self-pollinate. Normally, without human intervention, it takes two different chestnut trees within ľ-mile of each other to cross-pollinate and produce nuts.
Due to mortality caused by the blight, there are rarely two flowering American chestnut trees close enough to pollinate each other. Consequently, once a flowering survivor is located, chapter members help nature by doing the pollinating themselves.



At the Tamarack Center in West Virginia I found an artisan who walked the hills to find old American Chestnut wood fence posts on farms and the like that were made before the chestnut tree blight of 100 years ago. He would take the old and weathered wood and carve some very cool looking lamp posts and candle holders, etc. I gave them to an ex girlfriend and they are long gone, unfortunately.

Anyway, I think that will be one of those destinations that will get me there to check out the fishing in that part of the Bluegrass, and maybe even drive over to Cumberland Falls to see a Moonbow if the conditions are right, which I haven't seen in years. I think the gorge I'm looking for may be Bad Branch Gorge in the Kentucky Ridge Forest.

It is amazing the amount of musicians that have come up where Gearhart grew up - Ricky Skaggs, Charlie Sizemore, Chris Stapleton of the Steeldrivers from Paintsville, Patty Loveless, Loretta Lynn, Larry Cordle, Keith Whitley, on and on.

Derek H

[Edited on 7/15/2008 by DerekFromCincinnati]

 

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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 11:57 AM
quote:
Not long after the recording of most of an album in 1973, Charlie and the band took a few years (about 15) off from the music business, and he moved up to Washington State to fish for Steelhead trout. Charlie guided a bit, had a fly fishing store up there, and invented Steelhead fly's for a living, near the town of Oso, Washington. When the band started getting back together to play, they recorded an album in the 90s called Oso Special, which is named after a fly that Charlie invented.

The man is very extremely interesting, and after listening to his music all these years, and formulating an idea of what the man was probably like from his lyrical philosophy, it was gratifying to find out he's pretty much the way I had expected that he would be...just Charlie Gearheart...musician, fisherman, husband, father, stewart of the earth, guardian of his own back yard, and all around good guy.

Do yourself a favor and get Goosed...

Bill







I enjoyed Goose Creek in my younger days, and after reading your posts here, Bill, I'm looking forward to enjoying them again. It was such a cool vibe back in the 70s in Georgia. Most of us were "hippie" types, but we were Southern hippies. "Getting back to the land" was easy for us, because that's where we came from. When Jimmy Hall sang, "Are you a farmer, or are you a star?" that sort of thinking resonated with a lot of people. Bands like the Goose Creek Symphony, and all the others played music that was very timely and hip, but also reflected the Southern roots and work ethic that wasn't present (in the "counter-culture") in other areas of the country at that time. When Cowboy sang, "Don't you think it's better, living in the country?" we all knew where they were coming from..

Long hair and overalls...that's what I recall from those days. I'd like to see Goose Creek and feel that vibe again.

 

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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 12:58 PM
Thanks for the review and for bringing the Goose Creek Symphony to my attention. I have never heard of them but see that I have been missing out on some good music. I have to see them now. That's one thing I love about the ABB Forum, I've found so much good music here!

 

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  posted on 7/15/2008 at 01:00 PM
Bill, thanks for the wonderful review! Had to go listen to Goose Creek on vinyl after reading this last night

 

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  posted on 7/16/2008 at 04:00 PM
quote:


Long hair and overalls...that's what I recall from those days. I'd like to see Goose Creek and feel that vibe again.


Well, if it's overalls, a great nostalgic vibe, and that "back to the earth" feeling that you are looking for...Goose Creek is the band for you. Catch them while you can. Pretty soon they will be back into their fishing world for another year.
Bill

 

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  posted on 7/16/2008 at 04:16 PM
quote:
Bill, thanks for the wonderful review! Had to go listen to Goose Creek on vinyl after reading this last night




Terry,
I brought all my old album covers to the show, and Charlie, and Willard were nice enough to autograph them all. I even found out that Willard had a suspicious substance in his hand on the cover shot of the first album. Reminds me of a story about Duane and LAFE. Lots of laughs over that.

See you New Years if not before!

Bill
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Check out my music photo's:
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