Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Early morning, April 4......Shot rings out in the Memphis sky

Zen Peach





Posts: 24984
(25100 all sites)
Registered: 8/20/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:12 AM



Pride in the Name Of Love by U2

One man come in the name of love
One man come and go
One man come here to justify
One man to overthrow
In the name of love!
One man in the name of love
In the name of love!
What more? In the name of love!

One man caught on a barbed wire fence
One man he resists
One man washed on an empty beach
One man betrayed with a kiss

In the name of love!
What more in the name of love?
In the name of love!
What more? In the name of love!

...nobody like you...there's nobody like you...

Mmm...mmm...mmm...
Early morning, April 4
Shot rings out in the Memphis sky
Free at last, they took your life
They could not take your pride

In the name of love!
What more in the name of love?
In the name of love!
What more in the name of love?
In the name of love!
What more in the name of love...

 

____________________
Co-Owner of Charlie Tabers Football

 
Replies:

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 24984
(25100 all sites)
Registered: 8/20/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:19 AM
From the Chicago DVD

Pride

 

____________________
Co-Owner of Charlie Tabers Football

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16492
(16492 all sites)
Registered: 6/4/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:26 AM
I remember it so clearly, 1968 sure was a year of incredible tumoil, changes and insane times.

 

____________________


R.I.P. Hugh Duty


 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9610
(9621 all sites)
Registered: 8/3/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:38 AM
RIP. Dr. King. A courageous, true man of peace.


Abraham, Martin And John

Written by Richard Holler
As performed by Dion


Has anybody here seen my old friend Abraham?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
You know, I just looked around and he's gone.

Anybody here seen my old friend John?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
I just looked around and he's gone.

Anybody here seen my old friend Martin?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
I just looked 'round and he's gone.

Didn't you love the things that they stood for?
Didn't they try to find some good for you and me?
And we'll be free
Some day soon, and it's a-gonna be one day ...

Anybody here seen my old friend Bobby?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
I thought I saw him walk up over the hill,
With Abraham, Martin and John.


 

____________________
"In my dream the pipes were playing
In my dream I lost a friend
Come down Gabriel and blow your horn
Cause some day we will meet again"

Fallen Angel -Robbie Robertson (for HughDuty...and for TanDan)


RIP Strider...(1999-2012)

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 24944
(24974 all sites)
Registered: 1/5/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:45 AM

A man lay dyin in the streets,
A thousand people fell down on their knees.
Any other day he woulda been, preachin,
Reachin all the people there.

Lord, Lord, Lord.


But, Lord knows I can't change what I saw,
I say God rest his soul.

The Memphis battleground was red,
His blood came pouring from his head,
His woman and children falling down, cryin,
For the man they loved so well.

Lord, Lord, Lord.


But, Lord knows I can't change what I saw,\
I say God rest his soul.

Lord knows I can't change what I saw,

I say God rest his soul.


The mornin sun will rise again,
With all of their patience growin thin,
Whata we gonna do when war is come,
And we're dyin, dyin for the cause unkown?



Yeah but, Lord knows I can't change what I saw.

I say God rest his soul.

 

____________________

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2262
(2262 all sites)
Registered: 4/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:47 AM
It sure does make today's commercialized world seem so idiotic. While it was insane and crazy, the change was real back then. I remember my mother sitting watching TV stunned with tears in her eyes.....

 

____________________
Up in the Great White North Eatin' A Peach For Peace!!
http://www.myspace.com/fatbottomdaddy

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11157
(11157 all sites)
Registered: 9/17/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:49 AM
MLK:

"Ten thousand fools proclaim themselves into obscurity, while one wise man forgets himself into immortality"


What he accomplished is a very short period of time will live on forever.

 

____________________

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7628
(7628 all sites)
Registered: 10/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:50 AM
This brought tears to my eyes. Here's one white man who loves Dr. King dearly. Truly a man of peace, truly a man of love, truly a man of equality, irregardless of race or sex. Everything the man did, everything the man said, came from love, came from the heart. His legacy lives.

 

____________________
Don't let the sounds of your own wheels
Drive you crazy
Lighten up while you still can
Don't even try to understand
Just find a place to take your stand
And TAKE IT EASY

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8643
(8641 all sites)
Registered: 12/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:47 AM
Interesting article from across the pond.....

Seeking answers on King's killer
By Vincent Dowd
BBC News

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, 40 years ago on 4 April 1968.

A year later, James Earl Ray admitted to being the assassin. Because of that guilty plea there was no full trial. But Ray changed his story almost at once and until his death in 1998 insisted he did not murder Dr King. So was he the killer? And if so, did he work alone?


To many, 40 years after his death, Martin Luther King has become a sort of secular saint.

In 1968, many whites in Tennessee saw things differently. He was a rabble-rouser, an agitator, possibly a Communist.

In a society built on open racial divisions, his arrival in Memphis in support of striking black sanitation workers was a source of white anger and resentment.

In that very different America, not everyone was saddened by his death.

Dr King died of a bullet wound to the throat just after 6pm on 4 April. He had been standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, talking to colleagues in the motel parking lot about dinner plans.

Among them, aged 26, was Jesse Jackson - later a candidate for the presidency. At this distance, he can smile with affection recalling Dr King's last words.

"I was coming across the parking lot and he said 'Jesse - you don't have on a tie'. I said the prerequisite for eating was an appetite, not a tie! He said I was crazy and laughed.

"Then he looked at the guy who was with me, (the musician) Ben Branch, and he said 'Ben be sure to play my favourite song tonight - Precious Lord'. And then the bullet hit him in the neck and he was killed instantly."

Hired hand?

The official version would later be that James Earl Ray, working alone, had shot Dr King with a rifle from the small bathroom at the rear of the run-down boarding house across the street from the motel.


Jesse Jackson believes that is a partial truth, at best.

"I'm convinced Ray was not the lone shooter. He didn't have the money, the mobility nor the motive to have done it. The fact that James Earl Ray was able to get out of the city and out of the country means he was a hired hand. The government seems to have had the most motive for attacking Dr King."

The official line, never tested in court, remains that Ray was solely responsible for the murder - and initially Ray admitted to that.

He had been a no-account criminal, brought up in poverty in Missouri, who escaped from jail a year before the murder. After the assassination he fled Memphis, escaping to Canada and then London.

He travelled briefly to Lisbon, apparently hoping to arrange contacts with white mercenaries in Africa. He returned to London and was finally arrested at Heathrow trying to board a flight for Brussels.

Difficult questions

Those are some of the few incontrovertible facts. A small library of books exists about what may have happened between Ray's jailbreak and his arrest.

Those who insist Ray was indeed the gunman face difficult questions - yet so do those who claim he was not.

There are many such questions. Here are three of the most obvious which each side faces; first, those which his defenders have to answer:

Ray at first admitted to the murder. Isn't that the end of the story?

Author and lawyer William Pepper, now writing his third book about the case, says Ray was poorly advised by his first attorney, the late Percy Foreman. Mr Foreman told his client that unless he pleaded guilty he could face the electric chair (although the state of Tennessee carried out no executions between 1960 and 2000). Ray sought to change his plea within days but was not allowed to do so.

If Ray was innocent, why flee Memphis at all?

Ray always maintained he heard on his car radio that Memphis police were looking for someone resembling him following the assassination. As an escaped convict he could not afford to give himself up.

No one denies Ray bought a gun at least similar to that used in the shooting shortly beforehand. Why did he do so? And why rent a room in the boarding house opposite the Lorraine Motel?

This all touches on Ray's basic defence. He claimed that while on the run he met a man called "Raoul" in Canada who set him up as a patsy. Raoul, claimed Ray, said he wanted him to run guns. The rifle was a sample for potential buyers and the room was rented - using an assumed name - as a potential meeting place. Pepper claims Raoul is alive today and living near New York City. Others have doubted his very existence, suggesting he was invented by Ray to explain away all awkward facts.


On the other side, there are three key points which those who argue Ray was the gunman have to answer: The shot which killed Martin Luther King was highly accurate. Yet Ray, by no means a marksman, is said to have shot at an awkward angle through a half-closed window while standing in a bath-tub.

The author Gerald Posner wrote a book explaining why Ray must be the murderer. Posner says other writers overstate the difficulty of the shot and that Ray had used guns in petty robberies. Ray's lack of gun-skills also raises problems for those who say he may have been the gunman but was employed by others. With so many better marksmen available, why choose Ray?

Ray was a small-time crook. How did he get the money to go to Europe?

Mr Posner, who has researched Ray's life more thoroughly than anyone, is convinced he received no money in advance but may have believed he would receive a large "bounty" afterwards. The author says Ray already had money from dealing in marijuana.

Ray would probably never have been traced were it not for one strange act. On leaving the boarding house, says the official version, he dropped the rifle and other objects traceable to him on the pavement wrapped in a bedspread. Why would an assassin choose to leave behind such evidence?

Mr Posner admits this act is hard to rationalise. He speculates that either Ray saw police cars and panicked or that an accomplice was meant to collect the gun and dispose of it but failed to do so.

Mr Pepper believes this is all part of what he calls "the set-up story".

If anyone other than Ray was involved in the murder - or if Ray was wholly innocent - those responsible are now either dead or reaching the ends of their lives.

Some maintain the truth lies locked in FBI files.

The 40th anniversary of the King murder - and the imminent arrival of a new US president - is prompting them to call for those files to be opened at last.


 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 18593
(18594 all sites)
Registered: 11/20/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:58 AM
Rest Peacefully Dr. King - your legacy and your dream lives on.

"I Have a Dream"

delivered 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.

"I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating "For Whites Only". We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"


[Edited on 4/4/2008 by lolasdeb]

 

____________________
"Come on down to the Mermaid Cafe and I will buy you a bottle of wine, and we'll laugh and toast to nothing and smash our empty glasses down..."

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20219
(20233 all sites)
Registered: 9/22/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:59 AM

 

____________________
If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 11:01 AM

 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6143
(6142 all sites)
Registered: 8/11/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 11:50 AM
quote:
MLK:

"Ten thousand fools proclaim themselves into obscurity, while one wise man forgets himself into immortality"


What he accomplished is a very short period of time will live on forever.


They played the clip of Robert Kennedy speaking these words to a stunned crowd somewhere in America on NPR this morning. I'd never heard it. I honestly got chills listening to the actual speech. To think he himself would shortly be dead made it even more chilling.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 82618
(82977 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 12:30 PM

 

____________________
RIP Cindy Fischer
RIP Hugh Duty
RIP John Ott

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3475
(3476 all sites)
Registered: 3/10/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 02:33 PM
Has anybody here seen my old friend Abraham?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
You know, I just looked around and he's gone.

Anybody here seen my old friend John?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
I just looked around and he's gone.

Anybody here seen my old friend Martin?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
I just looked 'round and he's gone.

Didn't you love the things that they stood for?
Didn't they try to find some good for you and me?
And we'll be free
Some day soon, and it's a-gonna be one day ...

Anybody here seen my old friend Bobby?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
I thought I saw him walk up over the hill,
With Abraham, Martin and John.

 

____________________
We can bomb the world to pieces, but we can't bomb it into peace. - Michael Franti

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 26361
(26372 all sites)
Registered: 8/12/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 02:39 PM

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 10187
(10387 all sites)
Registered: 8/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 02:43 PM
I remember the day well.

My daughter was in Memphis all this week for school. I told her about MLK being shot around the corner from Beale Street. Being 23, she wasn't aware, she was so close to where he was shot. Her Birthday is the same as MLK, so she kind of has a personal connection with him.

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 14567
(14567 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 03:19 PM
RIP Dr. Martin Luther King

 

____________________
Pete

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 664
(674 all sites)
Registered: 8/18/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 03:27 PM
Thank you,Dr. King, for the enormous sacrifices you made for our nation.

 

____________________
"The Beatles are a gas." George Harrison (from a 1974 British radio interview)

*not to be confused with any other*

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 12325
(12448 all sites)
Registered: 2/25/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 07:35 PM
A man who meant so much to me in my early youth....

Remember the ride to school on the day he was shot and the entire school watched the funeral proceedings in the auditorium.... No classes that day. I remember crying because I did not understand death or why he had to die....

I hate that he was a called a leader of "Black" people. He was so much more for the common,everyday,ordinary man.

RIP....

 

____________________
"Political correctness is a doctrine -- fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rapidly promoted by mainstream media -- which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a piece of $hit by the clean end."

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1534
(1534 all sites)
Registered: 11/21/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:07 PM
Even though I was 2.5 years old at the time,it still saddens me very much.
 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 849
(859 all sites)
Registered: 11/25/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:43 PM
At the time of the assassination of Dr. King I was in the third grade, living in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. I remember the event well and can appreciate all the other posts before mine. One thing I want to point out is that Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot in Memphis, in the early evening of April 4, not the early morning.
 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11437
(11442 all sites)
Registered: 8/21/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:46 PM
I remember it as I was about 8 at the time, and in Atlanta. A very sad day, but fortunately the anger that followed did not result in much violence at all here. It was no doubt influenced by Dr King's special effect on his home city. We remain the city too busy to hate.

Such brilliance in guiding the change that had to come. I cannot think of another who lived in my lifetime that I admire more.

 

____________________

 
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com