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Author: Subject: Anyone else enjoy the 1940's era Big Bands?

Ultimate Peach





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  posted on 4/3/2008 at 10:27 PM
Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, etc?

I never paid them much notice, as they were before time, until about the early to mid 70's. I was a teenager then and big into the ABB, Clapton, Traffic, etc. Well, one day I was at home watching TV...this was back when every city had 5-6 stations. No cable, etc.

Not much on but a movie about the 40's band leader Glenn Miller.(Jimmy Stewart)

Anyway, I always like him and he did a great job with that part. But during the music parts of the movie with his band, I found myself sort of drawn to it. Primarily instrumental of course, and they sort of reminded me of the intrumentals the ABB had done. They even had guys come out and take solos. Trumet, trombone, etc

And on the uptempo stuff the rythmn section kinda rocked! The bass and drummer had kind of a bouncy groove going on.

When my mom walked through the room this little hippyish teenager said...

"Mom, you know, this music isnt bad! I kinda like it!" She said something like "Well, what do you know...Those hope for you youngsters!" Ha ha.

I remember she told me that back in the 40's some people that were rather "stuffy" didnt think much of the Jazz and Big Band groups. Thought the musicians were "disreputable". Ha ha...I guess maybe they were the "rock and rollers" of that era.

Anyway, here are some clips...

This is from way back, but the quaility is very good....

"In The Mood"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bR3K5uB-wMA&feature=related

This is from the current Glen Miller Orchestra....

"Little Brown Jug"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzMHMWjVZc0&feature=related


And to me, this is just a really really beautiful song. Also from the current band....

"Moonlight Serenade"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQseFAcWvtE&feature=related

"D"


[Edited on 4/4/2008 by D28guy]

 

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  posted on 4/3/2008 at 10:59 PM
A friend's parents - who could tell I was into music - took me to see Count Basie and Billy Eckstein at Carnegie Hall, I'll say it was about 1970. My friend's dad had been a drummer in a big band, and to this day when we get together, it's always all about music. Usually his music - jazz and swing.

The Carnegie show was great. Given the venue, the atmosphere was somewhat formal (we were sitting a few rows behind Buddy Rich), but I just loved the whole swing sound and the power that a big band can generate, and the precision of these guys is just remarkable.

Years later I was living out in Ohio, and saw where the same Basie band was playing in a small club in Dayton called Gilly's. I went with a friend, and wow - what a night! I love rock & blues, and loose myself in a Derek solo just like anyone here, but there is nothing in creation like what a great big band can do to a club when they get swinging - unreal! The memory is all the more precious now because it just doesn't exist today.

Forward a few more years, I got another chance to see the Basie band in Cincinnati, at Bogart's. It was a dreadfully cold night as the crowd gathered for the show. The band came out, but an announcer told the crowd that us that the Count was ill, and given the extreme temperatures, his doctor was prohibiting him from coming out. A local jazz pianist filled in - and did a great job - but it wasn't quite the same. A few weeks later we got the sad news that the Count had passed away.

It really was the ultimate: the best musicians, playing the best written and most challenging stuff, with the best singers of the day - and it was the popular music of it's time. I would give anything to have been alive during that period, living around New York, and able to enjoy what was an amazing music scene. Recordings just don't do justice to the joy, the precision, the feel, and just the amazing power a big band can produce. It was a thing of beauty, and sadly for all of us, it seems gone (at least for now).

 

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  posted on 4/3/2008 at 11:20 PM
Growing up music was a big part of my family. Everybody played an instrument. My Dad is a big time music buff/historian of sorts. He's big band music fan and always had something playing so I just picked it up thru osmosis. Up until a few years ago he was involved in Bix Biederbeck club or whaterever it was called. Bix was trumpet player in the 20's who lived too fast and died young. I guess people familiar with him can hear a recording and instantly recognize his playing, kind of like Duane on the guitar. My dad has a big sticker across his rear car window that says "Bix Lives",he made many trips to the Bix Biederbecke festival in Davenport IA. Another good movie is the Benny Goodman story.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mJ4dpNal_k

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 12:06 AM
Fujirich,

quote:
"but there is nothing in creation like what a great big band can do to a club when they get swinging - unreal!"


I've only seen a Big Band live one time, and I remember thinking...

This....is....POWERFULL!!!

"D"

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 12:21 AM
As a kid, I grew up next door to a woman who reportedly sung with either Tommy Dorsey or Lee Dorsey Orchestra. It's a vague recollection, but I always dug the sound of big bands.

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 02:39 AM
Don't forget Woody Herman!







 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 04:39 AM
O yeah. We have XM on our tv and I always tune into the 1940's music channel. Great stuff!!!

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 06:08 AM
The scene from The Glenn Miller Story that defines that movie and its music is when they finally decide on "the sound" that he wants and they play it for the first time, the dancers stop dancing and just stand there and listen and break into wild applause..kinda like when Derek rips off a solo and everyone at the same time gets the sense of how great it was.

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 07:04 AM
Yes , I love the Big Band Sound... Also when that music is on.. Love the look in my parents eyes.. My Dad is 85 and Mom is 80.. it's a beautiful thing..

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:49 AM
Can't forget 'Sing, Sing, Sing'
Benny Goodman

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 08:54 AM
Paging Mr. Buppalo.....
 
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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 09:02 AM
Growing up in our house the stereo was always on with Benny Goodman, Glen Miller, Tommy Dorsey et al......... the reason I started plyaing the drums, with my parents blessing was I was and still am a huge fan of Gene Krupa. I remember the first time saw the Gene Krupa story with Sall Mineo, I was blown away. I remember my dad letting me stay up to watch Carson when he had Krupa or Buddy on. Still listen to the music today as I hope my kids will in regard to the Brothers etc. that is always blaring in my house!

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 09:12 AM
When my grandmother passed away 10 years ago, I inherited her record collection. Her collection included some incredible big band performances. That's when I really started to get into it, even though that's what was always on when we would go to her house. It's great stuff.
 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 09:25 AM
Rob.....

A big "Oh hell yeah" here....
I could go on and on ad nauseum on this one. My daddy raised me on this stuff. It's how I came to Duane Allman. Playing foos ball, Buffalo Bar, 1973. Blue Sky came on the juke box. I said "Holy s*&^!! This guy is playing just like Goodman and Roy Eldrige and Lester Young!!" Same attitude. Same heart. I cannot explain it. I never heard it live until I stood in front of Derek Trucks when he was 15-16.

The Ken Burns' Jazz series did a great job of documenting the evolution of this genre of American music, IMHO....and its impact on the culture. Especially poignant on the 40th anniversary of Dr. King's passing.

If people want to learn more, a good starting point is the Smithsonian Series album, "Fletcher Henderson--The Making of an American Orchestra." My daddy made me understand that this was music originated by African-Americans that many white people got rich off of, while the true geniuses got shafted. A lesson I could later apply when it happened to Little Richard, Big Bill Brunzy, Big Mama Thornton.

Another "must have" is the Benny Goodman 1938 Carnegie Hall Concert. Goodman integrated American music. Always gave credit. Something I remembered when I heard Duane say, "We're going to do this Bobby 'Blue' Bland song....actually it's an old T Bone Walker song." Goodman, of course, was a genious in his own right.

Interesting, IMHO, to contrast the two above pieces to what came later....the Dorseys, Miller. They were much more polished, rehearsed, almost pop by comparison. Of course they had brilliant soloists and it was still fun. But lacked the raw passion I came to love from Fletcher's guys, Goodman's guys, Duane's guys.

There is a direct line from the passionate music of King Oliver, Kid Ory, Louis Armstrong, right through to Duane Allman. An interesting connection, one Randy Poe and I discussed at length over lunch, is John Hammond. Hammond put together the 1938 Carnegie Hall concert, promoted Bessie Smith, Basie, all the way to several 80's acts.
Was instrumental in creating the Newport Jazz Festival, with George Wien. Goodman married his sister Alice. His son John Hammond Jr. became one of Duane Allman's best friends, often hanging out with him at Jerry Wexler's house on Long Island, still doing cameos with his band on the Upper West Side.

This direct line of music came to an end in October 1971. It was resurrected in the late nineties, in the hands of a young man in an Atlanta Braves hat, his friend Jimmy Herring, others. Thank God.

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 09:32 AM
You may also want to listen to Artie Shaw. Unbelievably good. The poor guy must have marrie 10 times. He kept marrying starlets for their beauty; then he would torment them because they weren't smart enough.

One of the best concerts I ever saw was a tribute to the Duke Ellington saxaphonists in I think 1984-1985 at town hall. There must have been 10 top flight guys jamming on Cotton Tail for the finale

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 09:52 AM
The "sing sing sing" jam from Goodman's Carnegie Hall concert is one of my favorite pieces of music. Also any of Sinatra's Capital recordings from the 50's.
 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:19 AM
quote:
The "sing sing sing" jam from Goodman's Carnegie Hall concert is one of my favorite pieces of music. Also any of Sinatra's Capital recordings from the 50's.


Sing, Sing, Sing was the Whipping Post of 1938. When you listen to the solos, after the halfway point--Babe Russin on tenor, Harry James on trumpet, breaking off into Flight of the Bumble Bee just to remind the longhairs in the audience he could do the impossible and still play spontaneous, Goodman, topping off his long solo with a top A above high C, another impossibility that the NY Philharmonic guys would never try in public, then Jess Stacy's 4-chorus impromptu piano solo....

When you listen to this, think Liz Reed. Think Whipping Post. Listen to the passion being created, people playing from their hearts. "To the edge of their ability," in the words of Artie Shaw. Creating, in front of a live audience.

 
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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:32 AM
Love big band music! Was introduced to it by my father who is a big fan. He has one item in his collection I've never seen before and have not located on internet, either. It's a collecters edition of all Glenn Miller's recording's that are contained in a leather book (album size) with accompanying literature that he acquired sometime in the 40's or early 50's (I have loved this since I was a kid and asked him to keep me in mind if he ever decides to part with it).

Moonlight Serenade - music to swoon over...

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 10:52 AM
quote:
quote:
The "sing sing sing" jam from Goodman's Carnegie Hall concert is one of my favorite pieces of music. Also any of Sinatra's Capital recordings from the 50's.


Sing, Sing, Sing was the Whipping Post of 1938. When you listen to the solos, after the halfway point--Babe Russin on tenor, Harry James on trumpet, breaking off into Flight of the Bumble Bee just to remind the longhairs in the audience he could do the impossible and still play spontaneous, Goodman, topping off his long solo with a top A above high C, another impossibility that the NY Philharmonic guys would never try in public, then Jess Stacy's 4-chorus impromptu piano solo....

When you listen to this, think Liz Reed. Think Whipping Post. Listen to the passion being created, people playing from their hearts. "To the edge of their ability," in the words of Artie Shaw. Creating, in front of a live audience.


Bup... your posts on this are really cool... makes me want to go buy a whole collection!

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 11:03 AM
quote:
Yes , I love the Big Band Sound... Also when that music is on.. Love the look in my parents eyes.. My Dad is 85 and Mom is 80.. it's a beautiful thing..



my parents always got that same sparkle in their eyes! took/takes them back to a time when... you can just see it! my mom is 77 & my dad died last year at 85. they were both always very passionate in music which was instilled in both my sister & i, thankfully! we grew up listening to all the music of that era...big bands & jazz were always played in their house & car....and my mom was & still is also very into the broadway shows. as a kid, i always secretly liked it... but being that my parents were almost 40 & 50 when i was born, i always thought they were kinda, square, i guess for lack of a better term! they were more old fashioned & weren't into any of the same things that other kids my age's parents were... but as i matured, i realized that those sounds i grew up hearing were really awesome & something not everyone appreciates now!

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 11:32 AM
Discovered this style by going through my Grandpas record collection. Good stuff Duke Ellington is probably my favorite

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 01:48 PM



My Mom

 

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  posted on 4/4/2008 at 02:31 PM
I have a box of albums in the garage that were my grandfathers. He died in 1977, there might be some good stuff out there. I hope they are not warped. Wrapped tight, but can't remember if they are laying flat or standing.......

I know Arthur Fiddler and the Pops is out there, I always liked him or them.

 

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