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Author: Subject: Drum Help

A Peach Supreme





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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 06:27 AM
My son who is 18 wants to buy some drums and begin playing. For years he has been banging everything around the house- and now playing rock band has decided drumming is his call.

Any recommendations on what kind of drums or drum set to purchase? I am not a musician, only a music lover. We have a nice large basement but am dreading the noise.

Thanks guys

 
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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 06:44 AM
Like most musical instruments, you're dealing with quite a potential investment range. I'd strongly suggest considering a used kit for his first set. Save some money, and probably get better equipment than you would want to purchase new. There's always tons of used stuff out there.

If your son is really dedicated to this, I'm surprised he doesn't already have a very specific idea of what he wants. When I was his age, I was in shops all over my area, looking for used gear, learning about new stuff, and just generally gaining all the knowledge I could. If he's not doing this, it might be a telltale sign that this is only a passing fancy.

If you're really dreading the noise, and don't mind investing a little more, you might want to consider Roland V-Drums. These are top-of-the-line professional electronic drums. He can put on headphone and bang away with you barely knowing (or hearing) anything. They have a number of different kits at different price points. There's a few other manufacturers of electronic drums out there, most lower priced than Roland, and probably more than sufficient for a first kit.

E-drums are a pretty cool alternative for a home situation, and don't take up quite the space of an acoustic kit. You can plug a CD player into the module, and mix your playing right into the track. Purists will say that they don't have the same feel as acoustic drums - and they're right. But they also offer attractive options that acoustics just can't.

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 06:56 AM
I agree, used drums or at very least a beginners level drum kit is the way to go until you see if the young lad sticks with it, no pun intended. Some drum manufacturers have kits designed and priced for someone just starting out. If there are no music stores in your area try musiciansfriend.com. They have alot of drums at great prices and are pretty good when it comes to mail order. But you really want to go to drum shops and look around and talk to the drumers that work there and let your son really get an idea what drumming is all about.

The electronic drums are also a great idea as the sound can be controlled much easier and you won't go deaf. But then you will need to buy drums as well as a small PA to run the electronics through. He can practice through headphones but will eventually want to hear what he sounds like live.

Drum lessons are also an excellent idea for someone just starting out. Learn the rudiments and learn to read music. It will really help on down the line.

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 08:49 AM
I'd go out and find the loudest drums you could get !

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 08:54 AM
To go against the grain a bit here...I'd buy new, you could also look into either Pacific, Tama, Yamaha, all are making great intermediate kits in the 499-599.00 range. once you add a cymbal pack your cost will be around 7-800 bucks. But when you buy new you get all the warranties etc.

Make sure you get a 22 inch kick drum and a 16 inch floor tom (with legs) comes with it.
for more info

check out. www.pacificdrums.com, www.tamadrums.com www.yamahadrums.com www.mapexdrums.com

hope this helps.

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 09:22 AM
i too am of the policy that you get what you pay for...and in cymbals that is a fact not fiction...Paiste,Zildjin, sabian stay with them and try if you can to stay away from the cheap lines of cymbals it is a huge difference in sound and a new drummer will quickly want better cymbals... Size of drums is a personel choice goverened by what type of music ,space,and size of venues also setup is a real bear with big bass drums and larger size toms like 10x13 or 10x 14 you simply have no options in tom placement or hieght.

a Smaller Kick drum will when tuned properly with correct type head work and sound fine.I play vintage Rogers drums and i have two 14x20 kick drums as well as a 14x22 i use the 20's most of the time and they are boomers...so look at a vintage Ludwig or rogers kit they can be had for under a thousand and have a much better sound than 90% of new drums..also IMO stay away from DW drums they are way way over priced...

PS Alec is right get floor toms with Legs NOT this hanging wobbly stuff they are passing off these days



[Edited on 3/19/2008 by Rydethwind]

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 11:36 AM
I'd keep an eye out for a late model used car with a Pizza Hut delivery sign already on top.

Seriously, if you watch the papers, there are always used sets advertised. Make friends with a working drummer so you can have a buddy accompany you to the sale that knows what to look for in a used set of drums.

You don't have to spend a fortune on a beginner set, but I'd buy the best you can afford, that way you won't have to be replacing this and that as he grows with his ability. And, if he changes to another instrument you can more easily sell a decent set.

I found a vintage set of 1964 Slingerland's, complete with 8 Zildgin Cymbals for $200. The guy hadn't played them in 20 years and didn't want to move them to Miami. All I needed to do was to polish the chrome and tune them up. It doesn't happen every day, but you never know.

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 11:45 AM
quote:
I'd keep an eye out for a late model used car with a Pizza Hut delivery sign already on top.


LMFAO....i spit out my water.!!!!!!!!!

 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 12:16 PM
A few years ago I was in the same situation with my then 10 year old son. He started with lessons and I knew he needed something at home to practice on. I got him a Verve starter kit for about $380 until he could prove to me he was serious about drumming. The kit was as advertised. The hardware and cymbals were cheap and after helping him numerous times with home made repairs I bit the bullett and got him a set of Tama shells and a variety of Zildjian, Paiste,Sabian and DW cymbals/pedals there is no looking back. He is in the basement everyday practicing and getting quite good if I may say so. Bottom line is you get what you pay for but I wouldn't pay top dollar until you're convinced he's serious.
 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 12:29 PM
quote:
I found a vintage set of 1964 Slingerland's, complete with 8 Zildgin Cymbals for $200. The guy hadn't played them in 20 years and didn't want to move them to Miami. All I needed to do was to polish the chrome and tune them up. It doesn't happen every day, but you never know.


Damn, I jealous. What finish was on the set? Been many, many years since I played (late 60s/early 70s). Back then everybody had Ludwigs and Rodgers, but alway like Slingerland better. Wouldn't mind getting a set just to have to little fun with.

 
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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 12:41 PM
Hi there, you can get some great sets for about $1000 (including cymbals) Like many have said, do not go cheap on the cymbals. And yes, you can get great deals on used equipment but beware, drums go through hell if they are used for gigs.

Here is a pretty good article on buying drums. The guys is an independent drum shop owner so naturally he is going to tell you to buy from an indie but much of his advise is worthwhile.

http://georgesdrumshop.com/guide.asp

I have no affiliation with George other than I have bought a couple snares from him.

Cheers and have fun.
Paul

 

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A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 02:11 PM
everyone thanks for all the information, the website was of great help. It is truly a confusing endeavor but at least i have some good information. It seems like for someone with no experience buying something new in the 800-1000 range works best from a drum store.
 

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  posted on 3/19/2008 at 03:08 PM
Here's some more comments/suggestions from the Nov. '07 thread....

http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&am p;file=viewthread&tid=68324#pid1561121

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 06:28 AM
If it was my kid I'd get him a drum pad, a couple of sticks and a book teaching basic techniques with all of the rudiments and tell him once has some proficiency with all of the rudiments (all of the rolls, paradiddles, flams, flam accents, etc) then you'll move him to a full set. To many kids see a drummer pounding on a full set, get one and either get bored and you've wasted all the bucks on a set you wind up Ebaying or they go on to play without ever taking the time to learn any technique. I played for three years before my parents bought me a snare then another two years before I got my first set. I was first chair in school band and had won many superior ribbons for solos at various contests before I had a set. My style now, believe it or not, is full of rudiments. My faviorite and I play it many times a night is the flam accent. When we play Whippin Post I'll play one with the right hand on the cymbals and the left on the snare, sometime moving around my toms. When it is really fun is playing a tune like Liz Reed. It is a three pattern and Liz Reed is in four. Playing the three against the rest of the band playing in four gets very interesting. Bottom line is if I had gotten a set right off the bat I would have never wood-shedded those rudiments and I would not have all of that to draw from. If you really feel you have to get a set then at least insist on an hour a day on rudiments (no drums until he's pounded that pad) and check Ebay for a good (not great) in other words not too expensive set. I've seen it time and again that a kid will get crazed about drums and two years later it's something else and the drums are never touched again. Whatever happens, good luck and get your doctor to give you a script for valium. You're gonna need it.
 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 06:30 AM
Morn'in Butch..........
 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 07:04 AM
quote:
If it was my kid I'd get him a drum pad, a couple of sticks and a book teaching basic techniques with all of the rudiments and tell him once has some proficiency with all of the rudiments (all of the rolls, paradiddles, flams, flam accents, etc) then you'll move him to a full set. To many kids see a drummer pounding on a full set, get one and either get bored and you've wasted all the bucks on a set you wind up Ebaying or they go on to play without ever taking the time to learn any technique. I played for three years before my parents bought me a snare then another two years before I got my first set. I was first chair in school band and had won many superior ribbons for solos at various contests before I had a set. My style now, believe it or not, is full of rudiments. My faviorite and I play it many times a night is the flam accent. When we play Whippin Post I'll play one with the right hand on the cymbals and the left on the snare, sometime moving around my toms. When it is really fun is playing a tune like Liz Reed. It is a three pattern and Liz Reed is in four. Playing the three against the rest of the band playing in four gets very interesting. Bottom line is if I had gotten a set right off the bat I would have never wood-shedded those rudiments and I would not have all of that to draw from. If you really feel you have to get a set then at least insist on an hour a day on rudiments (no drums until he's pounded that pad) and check Ebay for a good (not great) in other words not too expensive set. I've seen it time and again that a kid will get crazed about drums and two years later it's something else and the drums are never touched again. Whatever happens, good luck and get your doctor to give you a script for valium. You're gonna need it.


I agree with Butch on teaching the rudiments, as I said in my post. And a practice pad is essential for a beginner to build hand technique and to keep the noise levels down as they learn to play. I still have a few of mine laying around. I built my first kit a piece at a time also. Started with a Rogers snare, then a bass drum, then a hihat, etc. I didn't get the whole kit till I had been taking lessons for over a year or so.

Thanks Butch!

[Edited on 3/20/2008 by Drummy]

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 07:20 AM
Hey there sweet family,

Thank you, Butch!

Take care and know that you are loved,

Lana

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 07:45 AM
quote:
Whatever happens, good luck and get your doctor to give you a script for valium. You're gonna need it.



LMAO...water spit number 2...

Drummers march to the beat of thier own...awwwww, never mind...

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 08:03 AM
I am the official owner of a kid sized loaner kit! I bought it used for Abi for $40 about 4 or 5 years ago. We have loaned it out at least 8 times now to other kids from age 7-12 and they never stick with it, so it comes back. I was going to yard sale it, but I think the loaner program has worked good for kids and parents around here so I hold onto it and wait for the next kid to come along to borrow it. We keep it in the storage closet, not out in Miss Pam's day care land or I might need valium too.
A couple of Summers ago we loaned it out for about a month to a boy Abi goes to school with who wasn't to interested with it but is now in the band at the Middle school playing drums. He payed pretty good at the Fall festival and I was glad to see he took it up again.

You got some great advice on here! Good luck!

 

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A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 08:22 AM
quote:
If it was my kid I'd get him a drum pad, a couple of sticks and a book teaching basic techniques with all of the rudiments and tell him once has some proficiency with all of the rudiments (all of the rolls, paradiddles, flams, flam accents, etc) then you'll move him to a full set. To many kids see a drummer pounding on a full set, get one and either get bored and you've wasted all the bucks on a set you wind up Ebaying or they go on to play without ever taking the time to learn any technique. I played for three years before my parents bought me a snare then another two years before I got my first set. I was first chair in school band and had won many superior ribbons for solos at various contests before I had a set. My style now, believe it or not, is full of rudiments. My faviorite and I play it many times a night is the flam accent. When we play Whippin Post I'll play one with the right hand on the cymbals and the left on the snare, sometime moving around my toms. When it is really fun is playing a tune like Liz Reed. It is a three pattern and Liz Reed is in four. Playing the three against the rest of the band playing in four gets very interesting. Bottom line is if I had gotten a set right off the bat I would have never wood-shedded those rudiments and I would not have all of that to draw from. If you really feel you have to get a set then at least insist on an hour a day on rudiments (no drums until he's pounded that pad) and check Ebay for a good (not great) in other words not too expensive set. I've seen it time and again that a kid will get crazed about drums and two years later it's something else and the drums are never touched again. Whatever happens, good luck and get your doctor to give you a script for valium. You're gonna need it.


Great post Butch, thank you! My 11 year old daughter, Alexis is taking drums up at school. She is the only girl drummer in her band class. Her teacher, Mr. Gentless often uses her as his model because she apparently has good technique. She's been begging for a drum kit and I've been conflicted because I know all too well how kids lose interest in things. So, I've decided that if she keeps on practicing and stays with it for at least another year, we'll look into purchasing something. Hopefully something electronic at first so she can put headphones on to play and I don't have to ask for a valiuum!

[Edited on 3/20/2008 by Jacquie]

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 08:37 AM
Nice hearing from brother Butch!!

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 08:53 AM
Don't forget your Salvation Army Thrift Store! I got a kit for $100. A man brought in his son's first kit. The son was ready for more drums. Had been playing since he was two and at age ten he was ready for more.!! I gave the kit to a church. It needed new heads and a cymbal or two....and a throne!

[Edited on 3/20/2008 by MissElf]

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 11:08 AM
Welcome back to the forums, Butch. Thirteen months between posts...

Hope to see more of you....especially at Wanee!!!!

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 12:02 PM
Lots of good ideas here. My oldest son has been playing for about 3 years now and even though Dad is a drummer with three kits in the studio he first was taught by me with a practice pad and my catelog of Paul Robson books only - for more than a year (see Butch's rudiments comments). He then graduated to one of the kits in the studio where I spent some time (about six months) teaching him some basic rhythms and grooves so he would know his way around the kit. He has been taking lessons from a good friend for the last 18 months (doesn't always listen to Dad) and he has come to me looking to buy his own kit. We are looking at used quality kits only. The new cheap stuff is just that cheap stuff warranty or not, I wouldn't waste a cent on the stuff. His budget, with what we are looking at can afford a snare, kick, one mounted tom and a floor tom as to drums. HiHat, one crash and a ride. I am a Zildjin guy and always have been so he is leaning that way. All in around $1,000. Your local music or drum shop will be able to find what you are looking for. Try Craig's list, ebay, or many of the sites alreay mentioned. Anyway, hope this helps a little. Glad to have another come into the fraternity!!

 

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  posted on 3/20/2008 at 12:18 PM
quote:
snare, kick, one mounted tom and a floor tom as to drums. HiHat, one crash and a ride.


Imho, that all most drummers really need. Some of the best drummers in the world, sets aren't much more than that. Perhaps a extra mounted tom, or another crash. And there does seem to be trend nowadays for lot of drummers to go to the smaller, simplier set-ups.

 
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