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Author: Subject: Wild Turkeys Invade Boston Suburbs- Yuppies React Accordingly

Zen Peach





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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 03:15 PM
Whew. This is unreal. I should only hope that a wild turkey follows me around like this.


quote:
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2007/10/23/turkeys_take_to_cities _towns/

Turkeys take to cities, towns
By Keith O'Brien, Globe Staff | October 23, 2007

BROOKLINE - On a recent afternoon, Kettly Jean-Felix parked her car on Beacon Street in Brookline, fed the parking meter, wheeled around to go to the optician and came face to face with a wild turkey.

The turkey eyed Jean-Felix. Jean-Felix eyed the turkey. It gobbled. She gasped. Then the turkey proceeded to follow the Dorchester woman over the Green Line train tracks, across the street, through traffic, and all the way down the block, pecking at her backside as she went.

"This is so scary," Jean-Felix said, finally taking refuge inside Cambridge Eye Doctors in Brookline's bustling Washington Square. "I cannot explain it."

Notify the neighbors: The turkeys are spreading through suburbia. Wild turkeys, once eliminated in Massachusetts, are flourishing from Plymouth to Concord and - to the surprise of some wildlife officials - making forays into densely populated suburban and urban areas, including parts of Boston, Cambridge and, most recently, Brookline.

Some Brookline residents have welcomed the birds, happy to see wildlife strolling amid the nannies with $300 strollers and Trader Joe's shoppers. But many others worry what the keen-eyed, sometimes ornery birds might do, prompting as many as a dozen calls to the police department every day.

"Some people are getting very upset," said Brookline police animal control officer Pierre Verrier. "One of the biggest things is, they're afraid. They don't want the turkeys to get hurt. And the other thing is, they're afraid of the turkeys around their children. They don't know what they'll do."

As such, Brookline police issued a statement last month, telling residents what they should - or should not - do if they meet a wild turkey in town. The basic advice: stay away from the turkeys. But still, people keep calling police headquarters to report the strangest sight: Turkeys in downtown Brookline.

* * *

July 20, 9:31 a.m., Rawson Road: Caller reports 18 turkeys in her backyard. "Something must be done," caller says. "It's just not right." Requests animal control officer.

* * *

Wild turkeys - the official game bird of Massachusetts - are impressive animals that can grow to be roughly 20 pounds and 4 feet tall. By 1851, they had been eliminated from Massachusetts, a victim of hunting.

"We were turkey-less for many years," said Wayne Petersen, director of the Massachusetts Audubon Society's Important Birds Area Program. "And then we decided it would be quite nice to get them back on the landscape."

Efforts to revitalize the state's turkey population between 1911 and 1967 failed. Then, in 1972 and 1973, the state Division of Fisheries and Wildlife released 37 turkeys in the Berkshires. These turkeys survived and bred. And between 1979 and 1996, wildlife officials trapped more than 500 turkeys in the Berkshires and released them elsewhere in the state.

Biologists were pleased; today's turkey population in Massachusetts lingers around 20,000. But Marion Larson, an information and education biologist at MassWildlife, said officials had not counted on the turkey's appetite for suburban - and even urban - living.

"That was something that surprised us," Larson said. "Who knew? The last time there were turkeys in Massachusetts there weren't a whole heck of a lot of suburbs."

This time around, of course, that is not the case, and turkeys have proven especially adaptable to residential living. By his last count, Verrier said, there are at least two dozen wild turkeys living in Brookline, feeding off everything from bird seed to gutter trash and, sometimes, scaring the wits out of the townspeople.

* * *

September 4, 11:01 a.m., Chatham Circle and Chatham Street: Caller - who had gone under some beech trees to take a picture of turkeys - reports four turkeys chasing him. Requests animal control officer.

* * *

The problem, according to some Brookline residents, is that the turkeys can be aggressive at times. Dr. Ruth Smith, an internist from New York City, was staying with a cousin in Brookline a couple of weeks ago when she was stalked by what she describes as a 3-foot-tall turkey.

"He came at me and, at first, I tried to shoo him away," Smith recalled. "I figured I'd just go 'Shoo!' and he'd go. But he was very aggressive."

Smith said she escaped by ducking into the Dunkin' Donuts on Beacon Street. But some of the hounded do not have the luxury of going inside. Brookline postal carrier Rosanne Lane said she has skipped houses on her mail route because turkeys dissuaded her from approaching.

"They make a lot of noise and I just take off," said Lane.

Under state law, an animal control officer can kill a turkey if it creates a public safety threat. In 2005, for example, Canton police killed three. But for now in Brookline, it has not come to that, said Verrier. When dispatched to the scene of a turkey, Verrier offers advice instead.

He tells people not to feed them, not to be intimidated by them, and to keep their distance. Still, some people cannot help themselves. They need to be near the turkeys.

* * *

September 7, 7:39 a.m., Druce Street: Two packs of turkeys (15) in the road . . . Two not getting along.

* * *

Over an eight-hour stretch last week in Brookline, a lone turkey walked Beacon Street, strutting at times, preening at others, and napping every now and again in the landscaping near the sidewalk.

Most people did not even notice. And those who did simply edged a few feet away from him and kept right on walking.

But as afternoon turned to dusk - and the turkey, a male, moved down Beacon Street into the heart of Washington Square - a crowd began to gather.

Some, like Jessica Dolber, snapped pictures. Others, like Kelly Stearn, called police.

But not Kettly Jean-Felix, the woman who had been followed by the turkey earlier that afternoon.

When she finally left the optician's office on the corner just an hour after being stalked by the turkey, she headed straight for her car. And this time the bird did not notice Jean-Felix. He was too busy eating peanut shells in front of the 7-Eleven and gobbling to the delight of the crowd.



Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company


 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 03:25 PM
There are two ways to handle Wild Turkey. One is with a shot glass, and the other is with a shot gun.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 03:25 PM
There are two ways to handle Wild Turkey. One is with a shot glass, and the other is with a shot gun.

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 03:25 PM
My grandaughter just hit one not ten minutes ago.

Came home with feathers in her grill. Turkey survived, and so did her car.

There are a few around here that just won't let you pass.

Really, i had to stop the car, as he would not move. When i tried to go around, he just moved over.

A few minutes later, the same turkey stopped a school bus. A damn funny sight.


 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 03:33 PM
quote:
There are two ways to handle Wild Turkey. One is with a shot glass, and the other is with a shot gun.


Would the double post would indicate the first method???

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 04:12 PM
First off - I do find packs of wild turkeys roaming the suburbs to be disconcerting and wonder if anyone on these boards has been running into these feathered fellows? I live in the city but have a neighbor who has chickens that she let's roam the block freely and that's about as fowl of an experience as I want (they tear up landscaping, throw mulch all over the place, and are now beginning to eat plants).

That being said, I am laughing right now. LOL - There are so many quotes in this article that are cracking me up.

"Brookline postal carrier Rosanne Lane said she has skipped houses on her mail route because turkeys dissuaded her from approaching."
Dissuaded her, huh? Turkeys are dissuasive???

"Over an eight-hour stretch last week in Brookline, a lone turkey walked Beacon Street, strutting at times, preening at others, and napping every now and again in the landscaping near the sidewalk. Most people did not even notice. And those who did simply edged a few feet away from him and kept right on walking."
I'm not proud to admit this but I think I used to date this turkey.

"He tells people not to feed them, not to be intimidated by them, and to keep their distance. Still, some people cannot help themselves. They need to be near the turkeys."
They need the turkeys - soon there will be support groups popping up to handle this.


"When dispatched to the scene of a turkey, Verrier offers advice instead."
The 'scene of a turkey'???

Druce Street: Two packs of turkeys (15) in the road . . . Two not getting along."
Hmmm - gaggle of geese, herd of cattle, pack of turkeys.




 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 04:33 PM
quote:
My grandaughter just hit one not ten minutes ago.

Came home with feathers in her grill. Turkey survived, and so did her car.

There are a few around here that just won't let you pass.

Really, i had to stop the car, as he would not move. When i tried to go around, he just moved over.

A few minutes later, the same turkey stopped a school bus. A damn funny sight.



hope the one hit had a red sox hat on

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 04:37 PM
quote:
There are a few around here that just won't let you pass.
Really, i had to stop the car, as he would not move. When i tried to go around, he just moved over. A few minutes later, the same turkey stopped a school bus. A damn funny sight.
I've heard of playing chicken ( ) but this game's new to me.

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 06:33 PM
If I lived there I'd buy a nice Co2 pistol and wack me a few of them. MMM MMM Good eatin.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 06:39 PM
They don't bother me. I have them in my yard and find them to be like any other wild bird only bigger! LOL! They do have balls and so do the gander but like dogs, if they sense you are afraid, they'll spook you. If you pass them by they don't bother you...the local hunters love them!

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 06:42 PM
quote:
Nah, most turkeys work in the Yankees front office.

old_time_fan, you got that right!!!

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 07:46 PM
I hope my cousin-in-law does not hear about this, he will be packing his bags and moving up to Boston. He lives for turkey hunting and tried to explain how to hunt the turkey you have to become the turkey....I respectfully declned!

 

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  posted on 10/23/2007 at 10:57 PM
quote:
quote:
Nah, most turkeys work in the Yankees front office.

old_time_fan, you got that right!!!

Oh..ha, ha...you two are a regular Burns and Allen...

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 02:58 AM
How do you know the woman that was pecked was a Yuppie?

coulda been a DINK.


gosh them dar city folk sure is stoopid

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 06:41 AM
quote:
Isn't the Mass. state bird the Turkey?




Wild Turkey is the State game bird for Mass., Oklahoma and South Carolina

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 07:22 AM
I've always found the term "Wild Turkeys" somewhat odd. Are there "Domesticated" Turkeys somewhere unbeknownst to me? I mean c'mon, Wild? We never hear about wild Chipmunks or wild Bears, but 4 or 5 Turkeys get together and all of a sudden... they are wild....

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 09:42 AM
BIGV ther are actually domesticated turkeys. You'll find them in the frozen foods section of your local grocer. These birds have been bred for large breasts and are not as bright as the wild variety. They can't fly very well or far and are easy prey to disease. The wild variety is smart. aggressive and they can fly. Hiking in the woods a few weeks back, I spooked a couple of hens and they flew up into some trees. Wasn't expecting it and it scared the crap out of me.
 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 09:52 AM
Looks like Newbury Street. Must be high end Turkey's. Sue I hope you get that joke



Article

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 10:25 AM
quote:
quote:
There are two ways to handle Wild Turkey. One is with a shot glass, and the other is with a shot gun.
Would the double post would indicate the first method???
Sorry, hair trigger...

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 11:01 AM
quote:
Looks like Newbury Street. Must be high end Turkey's. Sue I hope you get that joke

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 12:36 PM
quote:
I've always found the term "Wild Turkeys" somewhat odd. Are there "Domesticated" Turkeys somewhere unbeknownst to me? I mean c'mon, Wild? We never hear about wild Chipmunks or wild Bears, but 4 or 5 Turkeys get together and all of a sudden... they are wild....



Whoa, BigV, get off the hard road and get into them woods more, man. Upton did a good job of expalining. Yes, wild turkeys and domestic turkeys are two different things. There are no white turkeys in the wild. The wild ones are black and red and a few other beautiful colors as well. As upton said, they can get as large as 20-plus pounds, yet can fly in a big way.

In the wild, the wild turkeys have amazing eyesite and hearing, which makes them hard to hunt. What they do not have, and what deer do have, is a keen sense of smell.

The mortal enemy of the wild turkey is the owl. A best friend of mine witnessed a very cool battle between a wild turkey on the ground and an owl that swooped down to take it on. They fought and flipped and rolled along a fence line before the turkey broke through the barbed wire and sauntered off. That is why hunters go out at dusk and try to get the wild turkeys to call so they know what trees they are roosting in, and the call of choice is an owl call, which gets them all riled up.

Wild Turkey,


Domestic turkey,

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 12:42 PM

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 01:10 PM
quote:
If I lived there I'd buy a nice Co2 pistol and wack me a few of them. MMM MMM Good eatin.


I dunno..the wild turkey I've eaten (from the fields of Troy, Alabama) was tougher than shoe leather. Nice flavor but a real jaw workout.

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 01:37 PM
quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
If I lived there I'd buy a nice Co2 pistol and wack me a few of them. MMM MMM Good eatin.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



I dunno..the wild turkey I've eaten (from the fields of Troy, Alabama) was tougher than shoe leather. Nice flavor but a real jaw workout.




I've never experienced that. To be honest, it wasn't cooked right. Every piece of wild turkey I've eaten has been tender and good.

I is the same with venison as opposed to cows fattened up, hormone injected, etc. The wild deer meat has zero hormones or injections and is a LOT more lean, with much less fat, therefore you have to cook it as being lean. The same with wild turkey. The bloated and injected domestic turkeys are bred for one thing to produce over-sized breasts. The wild turkeys are clean and LEAN, with less fat, and should be cooked as lean. When you do that- sumptuous.

 

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  posted on 10/24/2007 at 01:57 PM
Agreed about the venison - delicious. Turkey very well may have been cooked wrong - still had a delicious flavor.

 

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