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Author: Subject: Poetry, Rock Music (and Beer) in DC

A Peach Supreme





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  posted on 10/2/2007 at 05:11 PM
Here in DC there's a great saloon called The Brickskeller, and in addition to beer tastings they host one or two Smithsonian programs during the year. Pleased to see a mention of the ABB in the following Brickskeller email I got today:

http://residentassociates.org/ticketing/subscriptions/series/detail.aspx?se ries=47771

You Say You Want a Revolution: Poetry and Rock Music 1955-1975

Brickskeller Evenings of Music, Poetry, Camaraderie (and Beer)

Wed., Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 7 to 9 p.m


Cultural upheaval, political activism, and social change marked the decades from 1955 to 1975. The Cold War, Vietnam, Kent State, and Watergate stirred feelings of alienation and rebellion among the increasingly visible youth generation, giving rise to icons of youth counterculture from the beatniks to the hippies and yippies who, of course, questioned traditional values and figures of authority. Poets such as Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Robert Lowell and James Wright, and musicians such as Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Jim Morrison, and Joni Mitchell were among the leaders in the assault on old ways of thinking. They sought to achieve more personal expression in their writing and developed new forms in poetry and rock music. Although critics called some of their work pretentious and narcissistic, some of it had the power to change our society.

Experience these connections between poetry and rock music against the backdrop of the times and listen to some of the ground-breaking poetry and music in this lively series that combines lecture, discussion, video and DVD clips, and recordings.

OCT 17 Searching for Authenticity (1955 to the early 1960s): Reacting against conformist and commercial culture, 1950s poets Allen Ginsberg, Robert Lowell, and James Dickey began writing poetry that was more colloquial, personal, dynamic, and accessible and that blurred the lines between highbrow and popular culture. At the same time, such young musicians as Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton turned to the work of folk artists and blues musicians such as Leadbelly, Robert Johnson, and Howlin’ Wolf in search of a less commercial and more authentic sound.

OCT 24 The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Into the 1960s): How cultural, social and political events influenced the creative work of poets and musicians. New movements in American poetry developed: Beat, Confessional, Deep Image, and Black Mountain. Poets such as Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Sylvia Plath, Robert Lowell, James Wright, and Robert Creeley stressed the relationship between the instinctual, the subconscious, and the world outside the self. Dylan moved music toward more complex lyrical content. Music from Bob Dylan, the Doors, Jefferson Airplane, and the Moody Blues.

OCT 31 Running With the New Style (late 1960s to early 1970s): Innovations in narrative and lyric modes: Dickey’s use of the split line in Falling, the Allman Brothers Band’s update of traditional blues, and the Beatles’ creation of the concept album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Structural and thematic similarities between Robert Penn Warren’s Audubon: A Vision and the Who’s Quadrophenia.

NOV 7 Singer-Songwriters and Lyric Poets: Songs by Joni Mitchell, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, Jackson Browne, and Lucinda Williams are contrasted with verse by Theodore Roethke, Charles Wright, and David Bottoms.

The course is taught by a professor and chair of the department of English at Catholic University. Hopefully you aren't limited to beers of the period to match the music...

FYI the other course, "Philosophy on Tap" deals with "Free Will and Personal Identity" and addresses such beer-worthy topics as Are We Cogs in the Machine?, Free to Be Free, and People, Amoebas, and Transporter Beams.

That is all...

enigmajean

 

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"We are all travelers in this world, from the sweet grass to the packin' house, birth til death, we travel between the eternities."

 
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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 10/3/2007 at 06:08 PM
too hip for the room sweetie...

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/4/2007 at 11:14 AM
quote:
too hip for the room sweetie...
I don't know about that...if I lived in DC this is something I would enjoy.

 

____________________
"Come on down to the Mermaid Cafe and I will buy you a bottle of wine, and we'll laugh and toast to nothing and smash our empty glasses down..."

 
 


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