Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2    3  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Is it country or is it pop?

Ultimate Peach





Posts: 3475
(3476 all sites)
Registered: 3/10/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 09:59 AM
While on the treadmill at they gym last night, I thought I’d keep an open mind and check out the country music scene. So I watched/listened to some of the CMT music festival. It was painful. Is there a new definition of country these days? IMHO this was not ‘country’ it was ‘pop’. I didn’t know most of the artists, but they seemed like pseudo-pop-princesses and boy-banders. In all fairness, Alan Jackson performed and he appeared to be talented and sounded like I would expect a country artist to sound.
 
Replies:

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20227
(20241 all sites)
Registered: 9/22/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 10:02 AM
I like the Wreckers.

 

____________________
If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 24390
(24565 all sites)
Registered: 3/31/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 10:49 AM
I don't know. Miranda Lambert is ok.

but i generally don't listen to it

 

____________________


 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8723
(8723 all sites)
Registered: 11/12/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 11:38 AM
I watched a small part of the Country Music Association award show a couple years ago, Rhonda, and it was pitiful, probably like watching the Grammys or--shudder--the MTV Awards instead of listening to good rock etc. music.

About the only time I listen to country anymore is when I go to this one grocery store, and for some reason they're maybe playing a country station over the P.A. instead of standard Muzak. It's almost never good, usually just horrible, but then that's the big local commercial country station--very CMT-like, Rhonda.

Amazingly, out here on the prairie, you get out in the sticks, or stalks , and in the very rural areas even a lot of the young people listen to country and emulate the fashions. I get the feeling that since Garth and Travis Tritt and whoever, young country fans feel that they are rocking out with country, instead of with whatever otherwise passes for rock these days. Look at the CMT show's stupid slogan: "It's country's night to rock." (I really hate what the verb "rock" has become!)

There's probably decent country being played out there somewhere, but I'm not too motivated to search much further in that direction than roots music. The Wreckers and Miranda Lambert, eh? I'll keep an ear out for 'em, guys, thanks.

 

____________________
"This is an old true story;
this is called 'I Must Have Did Somebody Wrong.'
(I wonder who.)"

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2097
(2099 all sites)
Registered: 8/13/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:18 PM
Pop with a cowboy hat on or these days, pop by some guy trying to look Hollywood but not quite pulling it off.

Awful songs but you can tell most of them at least know how to play their instruments.

Up until Garcia died, I used to think you'd here more real country in the first set of Dead show than anywhere else this side of Willie Nelson. Speaking of Willie, his recent Song Bird CD is pretty dam good. Even a cover of Stella Blue on there and it's one of my least liked tunes on the album.

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1961
(1979 all sites)
Registered: 11/29/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:32 PM
I guess the only need for "catagory names" in music these days is used for radio format definitions, bins at the music store, and for those useless corny awards shows...

'Ol Waylon said it best years ago, "CMA stands for Country My Ass"

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19435
(19449 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:40 PM
Country music has literally turned into pop rock, but there are those that still perform real country music and Alan Jackson and George Strait are among them. The best real country music comig these days is in the bluegrass category with bluegrass instrumentation used for country-esque music. Mountain Heart, Grasstowne, Bradley Walker especially, Ronnie Bowman, Melanie Cannon, The Grascals, Alison Krauss, JD Crowe, Larry Cordle and Lonesome Standard Time, Mark Newton, Alicia Nugent, all falling in that category. That is why bluegrass is such a breath of fresh air.

The music last night was not only pop rock, but I can't stand the formulaic songs that are gimmicky. That is the corporate influence on the music, which is blatant and all instrusive. I just interviewed country star Chris cagle for a newspaper in West Virginia, and I got a whole hour conversation out of it. It is a good interview because he tells it like it is as far as making it in Nashville. Exceprts,

quote:
My band wasn’t really any good in Texas. I think we were called Texas Heat. But, it was a really good place to go. When you have a band that is that bad, you are not asked to play in a lot of great venues. So, you get a lot of what I call ‘seat time in the saddle.’ You get a lot of time to get your balance and get your legs underneath you and kind of cut your teeth on the game and learn. I used to do a thing where, myself, on Friday night I would go and work the crowd in-between sets. I’m going to go and learn how to work people. I’m going to go find the meanest people who think we suck and try to make them my friends and my fans by the end of the night. Just for fun. It was either that or drink beer, and we were tired of doing that because, man, every night it was 50 bucks and free beer and we’re going to try and get at least a hundred dollars out of the place. You know what I mean? Then on Saturday night, I’d try and see if I couldn’t get three bookings. So, I would say, ‘Tonight is all about bookings.’ Do a set and make it great and then hit up the owner for a booking for June, even though it’s February. But, who cares. You let them know that you want to work. I would do merchandise. I would walk around and say, ‘Hey, we do birthday parties.’ Just network. That was what the Texas music scene did for me. It let me develop a little bit of….I was going to say confidence, but it wasn’t because I would go onstage petrified. That is the weirdest thing in my life. Once I got my record deal, and I felt like I had a guy like Scott Hendricks and Virgin Records behind me in the very beginning, when I felt that validation, and you look at their resume and you look at them saying, ‘I’m putting my stamp right here,’ that validation changed my life. You don’t walk scared. You know what I mean?


.............."What’s funny is, ever year (after moving to Nashville) I’d go, ‘Is this over? Do they even know me? Is it going to happen?’ Nope, give it a another year. Every January my New Year’s Eve was spent with myself trying to figure out if I was going to be there the next morning.”


How long did it take to find some success?

“Six years and four days, when I heard my first song on the radio. I was on I-40 west between Charlotte Pike and Old Hickory. In fact, I almost ran off the road. I had to pull over. It was funny, it was so surreal because I was sitting there thinking, ‘I know that song, man.’ About that time I heard the vocals and I went, ‘Oh my goodness, that’s me.’ And, what was weird is that when that three minutes was over, I cried my eyes out, I thanked God, I did the whole nine yards, and I went home and had to go and make all new goals. Because, up to that point in my life it was like, ‘I don’t care, I just want to hear myself on the radio once.’ And then, when it was done, it was like I celebrated that moment and had that emotional time and then I went, ‘What do I do now? That was it.’ So, it was, ‘Ok, what do you want to do with it? Does it matter as much as you thought it would?’ A lot of time you think something is really going to fulfill you and you get it and achieve it and all of a sudden you’re like, ‘That really didn’t do that much for me.’ The night I got my first gold record is the most impressed that I’ve ever been.”

......................"In Texas, you play football, and everybody kind of made fun of me about the guitar. So, I’ll just take piano lessons because you only have to carry sheet music and you don’t have to worry about anything. So, at home, I couldn’t play rock and roll. I had to listen to Christian music. I would get tablature for the piano of Elton John or Journey, and then I would play their songs. But, I would make up lyrics from the Bible for their template of music. I would sing Christian lyrics to ‘Faithfully,’ or ‘Don’t Stop Believing.’ (laughing) My Dad was like, ‘This is really good.’ Then, I was seventeen and I’m like, ‘I’m going to hell. I’m lying to my Dad. He thinks these are songs that I wrote.’ "

...........When I was in Nashville, man, I didn’t play around a lot. This was my rule – I would go out to a bar or I would go to a place where I was supposed to be seen, and if I saw some people there that I wanted to meet or wanted to write with, I would literally go bump into them. And, I mean physically bump into them. And, after about three or four weeks in a row, like Rich Fagan. I wanted to write with Rich Fagan so bad because he wrote that ‘Be My Baby Tonight’ lyric, and we were at an open mic night, or something like that, and for a couple three or four weeks in a row I’d walk up to him at the bar, him and Tom Oteri, and bump into him. After the third week in a row, he looks over at me and says, ‘Man, don’t I know you?’ I was like, ‘Dude, you and I bumped into each other right here last week.’ So, what I was saying was true, but every time I bumped into him I was like, ‘Hey, oh, excuse me.’
“Eventually we started talking and he was like, ‘ So, what do you do?’ I said, ‘Well, I’m a framer.’ He said, ‘Framer? Gosh, everybody says ‘I’m a singer.’’ I said, ‘Well, it’s not paying the bills right now, so I’m not a singer.’ He said, ‘I like that.’ ‘But, I want to be one, I want to write, I want to do the whole nine yards. I’m just out here tonight checking things out, seeing the action.’ ‘You want to get up and sing?’ he said. But for me, if I heard anything up there that I could not beat and steal the show on, I wouldn’t play. But, when I knew I could, that’s when I played. That’s when the buzz started. That is when things started with the ‘Have you heard this Cagle kid?’


“The first week that I ever got up and started playing at parties with all my friends who had their songs cut, the first two songs I ever played was ‘Breathe In, Breathe Out’ and ‘My Love Goes On and On,’ my first single and my first number one. It was really hard for me to hold to that promise to myself of ‘don’t play until you can at least win.’ But, there’s got to be a method for everybody’s madness. What ever works for you, works for you. What ever works for me, works for me. If anyone is going to Nashville for that purpose, all I can say to them is - have some type of plan. Even if the plan is, I don’t know what the hell I’m doing, I’ll make a plan when I get there. Have a plan. If you don’t figure out what you are going to do for yourself, people are going to do it for you. If you don’t figure out what it is you want to do in life, if you can’t figure out what it is that really turns your crank, that you love….if you love the feel of fertilized soil, then you should to be a horticulturalist or a gardener or whatever.”

..............I met (the late songwriting legend) Harlan Howard in 1996, 95. You talk about a hoot of a character, a human being. When I first met him I was kind of joking with him because we were at bar called Sammy B’s down on Music Row, and Mr. Howard walks up and says, ‘Excuse me there, son.’ I said, ‘Yes sir?’ He said, ‘You’re in my chair.’ I was like, ‘Well, I don’t see your name on it,’ joking around. He goes, ‘It’s right there, you son of a buck.’ And, it was an actual brass plate that said, ‘This seat reserved for Harlan Howard.’ He was not kidding. I said, ‘Forgive me.’ So, we started talking and he asked, ‘So, what do you do?’ I said, ‘Oh gosh, man, I’m a waiter this week.’ He goes, ‘What do you mean?’ I said, ‘You know, I want to be a songwriter. I want to be a singer, the whole nine yards just like everybody else, but this week I’m waiting tables.’ He said, ‘Ok.’ Well, for some reason, his heart was kind of turned towards me. I have no idea why. He kind of sat there and said, ‘I want you to come down to my office and meet me and I want you to come play for me, and want to see what your stuff is, what you do.’ I went down there and played, and he told me that I wasn’t very good. I asked him how to fix it, and he kind of shared that with me. He gave me a little template for writing, and told me to go and write 40 songs and bring him the last ten. The last song I wrote, he had on hold within a week with Patty Loveless. I was walking sideways. I’m glad I didn’t go and buy a truck or anything, because she never cut it. But just to hear him say, ‘Now this is some material, son. Let’s go get this one demoed. We’ll demo this tomorrow.’ So the next day we’re in the studio, and the next day he’s got it on hold. So, that’s pretty amazing stuff.”

Another notable songwriter in Nashville died not long ago with George McCorkle, an original member of the Marshall Tucker Band. There are definitely some southern rock influences in your music. Did you listen to a lot of southern rock when you were coming up?

“Oh yeah, man absolutely. Well, I was about to say that it kind of seems like it has to be, but I guess it doesn’t. But for me, I was more southern rock growing up than I was country, which I think kind of makes me more redneck than cowboy. Which, I don’t mind. You can call me whatever you want to. I’m not redneck and I’m not a true cowboy. But, it is so funny how people perceive us in this rural aspect of life. You know, ‘Bless their hearts, they’re in the dark and they can’t read and they’re all inbred, and whatever.’ I mean, it’s kind of comical. But, I don’t mind it because I feel like we are the ones secretly living a life that if they knew they could live, they’d come and destroy it. So, let them have it, and let them look as far and as long down their nose as they want to.”

What southern rock bands were your favorites?

“38 Special. The Allman Brothers. Charlie Daniels was country, but to me he was southern rock. I thought Johnny Lee had a little bit of a rock feel to him. And then, I liked James Taylor and the Eagles. For some reason when I was younger I liked the harmony things. The harmony (singing) struck me. I think it was because I had so much trouble singing them.”


...............The one thing that I can say that we went after and focused on is (with this new album) that producer Scott Hendricks and I were talking, and Scott sat me down and said, ‘I believe that you need to change some things in your career. What I did was I took the time to go through the critical statements that people made about your past records, and about your career, and I want to find the things that are wrong with your career so we can make the things that are wrong better, and leave the stuff that is going great alone.’ I said, ‘That makes pretty good sense.’ Everything that was said negative was about the quality of the material. All of it was about, ‘We want better songs. We want better songs.’ I’m telling you right now, we have some kickass songs on this album."


Do you let the band cut loose every once on a while?

“Oh yeah. I give them their own five or ten minutes in the show. I see so many people in this world walk up onstage and take all the credit. Man, with all of these people around me, I cannot be willing to take any of this credit unless I’m willing to give it to everybody that it is due to. These guys get up just like I do, if they’re sick or they feel bad or whatever, whatever the deal is, they still have to walk out and put on a smile and kick it in the tail because that is what they are getting paid to do. They do it and they don’t complain, and they are like, ‘I’m with you,’ and it shows. It’s a great thing. It’s a joy to be associated with them.”

What do you want the crowd coming away with when they see you live?

“I want them to know that we appreciate them. When we walk away from a show I want people to know, ‘Man, that dude has a ball, and I was a part of that thing, and one of the reasons that he did.’ I want them to be entertained. I want them to say, ‘Man, I want to see that guy again.’ I think that everybody tries to over-think this business. I am the person that comes to your town to take you to another place away from your town. It’s not that you want to escape, or that your town is not the place to live. It’s just that everybody wants to have that one night out of three months that you can let your hair down and not have to worry about it. That your safe, and you know in the process that you’re going to have a good time and listen to some music. And, if you have never heard of me, maybe you’ll become a fan. Who knows. That is my heartbeat in it."

.......... “I make music, I do what I love, because it was something that was in me, and it was the one thing I knew I’d do for nothing if they’d let me. I loved it that much, and got lucky, and was in the right place at the right time, and some guy said, ‘Hey man, I’m going to pull a million dollar trigger.’ You know, when he said that, I wanted to hold my breath because I didn’t want to talk my way out of it. Just as much as I appreciate where I’m at right now, I appreciate the pain I’ve been through in the last two and half, three years of my life. The last two and a half years of my life have been crap. Lawsuit, baby wasn’t mine, the whole nine yards. I’m all good with it. In fact, the new album is called, ‘It’s Good To Be Back.’ But, it is not about being back on the radio, it’s not about being back in the studio, it’s not about being back on the road. It’s about being Chris again. I was beat up. I didn’t care. I was wounded. And you know what, I’m back. Just me. Take it or leave it. Redneck, this is it. Here I am. If you don’t like it, that’s cool. I can move over and there is somebody else that you probably like. But, there is going to be some of them that do like me. That’s the stuff that I know, and that is the stuff that I absolutely do not take for granted and I cherish it, and I do not take it for granted.”

..............“The famous side of things, man, that’s all smoke and mirrors. That’s going to go away. I’d rather have, than have a career as big as Kenny Chesney’s, I would rather have a career as big as Neal McCoy and people think, ‘You know what, that is the best dude I’ve ever met in my life.’ I’d rather have the other. Come on, how much money can you make? I probably wouldn’t complain about it. But, is that it? Is that the deal? Or, do we stop and lets go do something with this money? I’ve got some questions for myself about when we get there. We’ll see what happens.”

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 27533
(27822 all sites)
Registered: 2/18/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:47 PM
When I was writing songs, I never liked working in Nashville. People booked two hours in a place and expected to come out with a song when their time was up. I called them crafted and I hated the process. After a couple of times writing up there I stopped. It wasn't any fun either. You can tell which songs are just written to be cute and which ones come from the heart....you get goosebumps the first time you hear the latter, not a case of b'donkey donk butt from the former.

 

____________________
Sometimes we can't choose the music life gives us - but we damn sure can choose how we dance!


 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3475
(3476 all sites)
Registered: 3/10/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:54 PM
quote:
... Look at the CMT show's stupid slogan: "It's country's night to rock." (I really hate what the verb "rock" has become!) ....


Peter, funny you mention that because I just about flew off the treadmill last night when I heard some bleached-blonde star say to her fans "We're gonna party like rock stars." I was kinda embarrassed for her....at least stick up for what you doing!

Derek,
Nice interview.

Stick,
Loved the Waylon quote.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19435
(19449 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 12:57 PM
Thank you, Rhonda.

By the way, if there are any horse lovers out there, I can post Cagle's thoughts on his cutting and reining horses that he owns and keeps at Jim Babcock's ranch in Texas. Babcock just had a sire that set all the AQHA records.

DH

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1505
(1505 all sites)
Registered: 7/24/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 01:42 PM
Todays mainstream country is about as country as Times Square, they are manufactured "acts" Plus most of the lyrics are so DUMB and SIMPLE, : I lost my pickup truck and my girlfriend,bla ,bla, bla,. Give me Hank 3, Gram Parsons or the Skillett Lickers, That's the real deal folks.




It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. No signed paper can hold the iron. It must come from men. The words of Ten Bears carry the same iron of life and death. It is good that warriors such as we meet in the struggle of life... or death. It shall be life.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20227
(20241 all sites)
Registered: 9/22/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 02:10 PM
quote:
Give me Hank 3


Tri-Cephus Rocks..I er, er uhm mean is great !

 

____________________
If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13859
(13913 all sites)
Registered: 7/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 02:15 PM
Sometimes I think that the Nashville industry is gettin' even with the 60's "country-rock" movement (Byrds, Purple Sage, Burrito Brothers et al). Seems like what we've got here is "rock-country". I've got to say that I prefer Gram Parsons, Chris Hillman and those guys to stuff like Billy Ray Cyrus (is he still making records?) and all the current crop of "hat singers".

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23542
(24044 all sites)
Registered: 1/2/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 02:54 PM
I played "new country" along with some more traditional country for the better part of five years between 1995 and 2000 in various house bands. I had a great time doing it, met some interesting people along the way, and some not so interesting, and developed an affinity for tequila and Rattlesnake shooters. There are more country "stars" these days, and Nashville, and the music it's cranking out, is pretty much cookie cutter crap now, IMO. There are so many cross genre's of music out there now it's hard to label a lot of the music.

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11675
(12118 all sites)
Registered: 1/8/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 03:28 PM
quote:
There are more country "stars" these days, and Nashville, and the music it's cranking out, is pretty much cookie cutter crap now, IMO.


Yeah, most of it is crap, but some of it is fun crap.

 

____________________
We'd all like to vote for the best man, but he's never a candidate.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 29948
(30044 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 03:33 PM
Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and Ray Price are touring together.

that's real country.


gonna be in dancingronda's neck of the woods at Merriweather in Sept.

 

____________________
People Can you Feel It?

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23542
(24044 all sites)
Registered: 1/2/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 03:37 PM
quote:
quote:
There are more country "stars" these days, and Nashville, and the music it's cranking out, is pretty much cookie cutter crap now, IMO.


Yeah, most of it is crap, but some of it is fun crap.
Oh, I agree. I didn't say it can't be fun.

 

____________________

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3475
(3476 all sites)
Registered: 3/10/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 03:39 PM
quote:
Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and Ray Price are touring together.

that's real country.


gonna be in dancingronda's neck of the woods at Merriweather in Sept.




Willie rocks!

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13859
(13913 all sites)
Registered: 7/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 03:40 PM
Willie also rolls ... big fat ones!

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23542
(24044 all sites)
Registered: 1/2/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 04:22 PM
Aside from the traditional country players from the glory days, like Willie, Waylon, Johnny Cash, etc., I like a lot of the newer folks who are more traditional in their approach to country music. Alan Jackson, George Strait, Marty Stuart, even Garth Brooks and Travis Tritt are all good shows to catch. I even occasionally like Tim McGraw (because he's married to Faith Hill!! ) But I'm not crazy about the flavor of the month type country singers who have chorus line dancers and crazy pyrotechnic stage shows. I still like sad, cry in your beer songs and songs about unrequited love. One thing country music can and will do is make you feel....

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19435
(19449 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 05:13 PM
quote:
George Jones with Mountain Heart

Taft Theater, Cincinnati, Ohio
November 13, 2003


It is a cold, windy night as the people file in to see the Ole Possum in concert. Although George Jones is in his 70’s the Taft Theater is nearly sold out with fans of all age groups, including a bunch of young folk. I grab a beverage and head to my seat and notice that, amazingly, this show has started right on time. I am not used to shows starting on time so I nearly miss the opening act, the excellent Bluegrass group Mountain Heart.

These guys only have about 20 minutes to play, as all George Jones warm-up acts do, but they take full advantage of it and dig right in. Bluegrass music has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years and it is great to see such bands mix with those on the Country music side of things. Mountain Heart play only five songs yet still take the time to show off their impressive instrumental abilities. Although their set is much too short, they are well-received by the audience. Soon, it is time to move on as the George Jones Show is about to get rolling

George is also known as No Show Jones. Years ago he had a reputation for drinking to the point of not being able to perform. Although he has long since given up the booze, the announcers still play up that characterization. In-between the opening act and George’s portion of the show, a big screen is lit up behind the stage with ads running on it for the many products that the Ole Possum is selling these days. There is George Jones Marinade, George Jones Sausage, George Jones BBQ sauce, and more. At the same time, an announcement is made for the Jones fan club members to have their ID cards ready so they can meet and greet their musical hero backstage. Everything is planned out, the system is in place.

As the show starts his band, The Jones Boys, come out and do a few numbers on their own, and they are very good. You get the idea that when they are off duty these guys could jam up a storm with just about anybody. After a number or two George’s two backup singers come out to sing a song of their own. Sheri Copeland comes out and, while a very talented singer, she chooses to sing the song “I’m Not Lisa.” Man, I never liked that song from back in the day, and when she starts into it a collective cringe comes over the audience.

Copeland's singing partner, Barry Smith, comes out and sings an upbeat tune and then says he is going to make a special announcement. He acts like it is bad news, that George might not indeed show up tonight, but it is all in fun as he tells a joke and then moves on to introduce the star of the show.

George Jones comes out with his trademark guitar and dark glasses and goes right into the song “High Tech Redneck,” which gets the crowd going. He then drops into ‘Once You’ve Had The Best” and it is instantly obvious that his excellent country music voice is in fine shape. The man still has the chops, and the crowd loves it. He then explains that he had broken a tooth earlier in the day, to bear with him on that, but he keeps right on going.

He may not sip the mash anymore, but he still doesn’t duck it. In fact, he laments about modern country music by saying; “You don’t hear drinking songs anymore. I’d be out of a job if I didn’t sing drinkin’ songs.” About halfway through the show he has his backup singer, Barry Smith, do a live commercial for his products and it ends with this line; “There won’t be any ‘no-shows’ for breakfast when you serve George Jones Sausage.” It is Grand Ole Opry product hawking at its best.

But this crowd doesn’t mind, and George does not disappoint. When he sings the line, “ four walls around me,” the crowd is right there singing with him. “One Woman Man” is good old fashion honky tonk, as is “White Lightnin’.” “The Grand Tour,” “She Thinks I Still Care,” and “50,000 Names” are also great. The latter is accompanied by a video of the names of the soldiers on the Vietnam Wall. Along the way George, believe it or not, gives out birthday announcements to those in the audience. But it is all a part of giving the fans what they want. He works the hall like an old pro and ends the concert with three hits in a row, “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” “Golden Ring,” and a kicked up “I Don’t Need Your Rockin’ Chair” that has all in the house on their feet and clapping as he walks off the stage and onto his bus. At 72 years of age, Ole Possum still is one of the best singers in all of country music.



 

____________________

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4857
(4887 all sites)
Registered: 11/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 05:54 PM
quote:
Willie also rolls ... big fat ones!


Not that there is anything wrong with that

 

____________________


 
E-Mail User

Peach Bud



Karma:
Posts: 5
(5 all sites)
Registered: 4/10/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 06:56 PM
Alt Country is pretty good - Wilco, Calexico, check out Neko Case - she has an amazing voice.
 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9012
(9011 all sites)
Registered: 8/16/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/24/2007 at 07:27 PM
Check out Tift Merritt "bramble rose" and any album by Chris Knight [he is backed up and produced by Dan Baird ex- georgia satelite.]
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 18592
(18652 all sites)
Registered: 2/9/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 7/25/2007 at 05:27 AM
Sadly, Country Music is now defined by the size of the Cowboy hat you wear.

 

____________________


 
<<  1    2    3  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com