Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Kentucky Derby Winner Barbaro Put Down

Zen Peach





Posts: 31173
(31246 all sites)
Registered: 3/13/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 03:51 PM
After nearly 8 months, Barabaro lost his battle with laminitis and an abscessed right rear hoof and was euthanized this morning. Sad but also nice that we can be inspired by a horse.

 

____________________
"Without going out of my door, I can know all things on Earth. Without looking out of my window, I can know all things in Heaven. The farther one travels, the less one really knows."

 
Replies:

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19426
(20204 all sites)
Registered: 3/13/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 03:54 PM
i really have a lot of compassion for this horse, of course.........


so i'm left wondering......how much money do you think it cost to keep this horse alive? Probably much more than most of us make in a year. If the amount of money that was spent to save this horse was used in a foreign country for health care......think of the number of lives it may have saved.

so yes, i am inspired by this horse to donate some money to africa for TB shots or something.

 

____________________
you know there just ain't no telling

what a satisfied girl will do.

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23542
(24044 all sites)
Registered: 1/2/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 03:57 PM
Sad....RIP Barbaro

 

____________________

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2017
(2030 all sites)
Registered: 12/30/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 04:15 PM
quote:
After nearly 8 months, Barabaro lost his battle with laminitis and an abscessed right rear hoof and was euthanized this morning. Sad but also nice that we can be inspired by a horse.


R.I.P. Barbaro, he was an inspiration and a true champion until the end. Sweet dreams.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 18560
(18605 all sites)
Registered: 1/2/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 04:57 PM
It's sad the horse had to suffer for 8 months. If it had been any other horse it would have been put down on the track.

 

____________________
It was fun while it lasted




 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13580
(13834 all sites)
Registered: 2/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 06:06 PM
a big beautiful champion.

I'm bummin'.

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1075
(1075 all sites)
Registered: 1/6/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 06:11 PM
The fact that they kept this poor beast alive for 8 months is tragic. I'm sure his owners squeezed every last drop of seed from him in the past months. Imagine how many people could be fed with the financial proceeds of his sperm.

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2777
(2780 all sites)
Registered: 3/25/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 06:17 PM
off to the glue factory......rip a true champion!!!

 

____________________
make music not war

http://www.e-z-2-win.com/hats.htm

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5944
(6041 all sites)
Registered: 1/24/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 06:19 PM
No artifical insemination in the thoroughbred industry (to avoid fraud.) His seed had no value. They probably spent a fortune trying to keep him alive. Now that he's gone, there will probably be a life insurance payoff. But they could have collected that at the beginning, before the vet bills.
 
E-Mail User

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 422
(425 all sites)
Registered: 6/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 06:28 PM
Mule75, you couldn't be MORE wrong!! The owners, The Jacksons are two of the most caring, compassionate people in horse racing. The money doesn't mean a thing to them, they don't need another penny. Nothing was "squeezed" from him, the game doesn't work that way. When it was determined that the horse was suffering or that he may suffer in the future they put him down, simple as that. There were many people involved in this decision and the important decisions that had to be made over the last 8 months and there is not a doubt in my mind they had Barbaro's best interest at heart. Animals like people fight to survive, and Barbaro fought as hard as any. One may argue whether it was best to put him down on the track or 8 months later, but to say "keeping this poor beast alive was tragic" and the Jackson's were doing this purely for financial gain is complete ignorance.

 

____________________
"The next time you throw a train, man, invite me"---Janis Joplin

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1075
(1075 all sites)
Registered: 1/6/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 07:02 PM
quote:
and the Jackson's were doing this purely for financial gain is complete ignorance.


Indeed. My bad. I'm obviously ignorant of the rules of the horseracing business. I just figured that the decision, as too many other things in this world, might be fueled by greed.

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 655
(682 all sites)
Registered: 8/18/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 07:13 PM
How sad to lose Barbaro. It would have been nice for there to be descendents of such a champion. His owners must be devastated.
 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1347
(1347 all sites)
Registered: 3/1/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 07:28 PM
Brendonw, you are absolutely right.The medical advancements that have been made will be invaluable for the future.In the 35 years I've been following racing, this could be the best thing that has happened to this wonderful sport.Kudos to the Jacksons' and the medical staff at that equine facility.
 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2721
(2727 all sites)
Registered: 8/1/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 07:31 PM
quote:
Mule75, you couldn't be MORE wrong!! The owners, The Jacksons are two of the most caring, compassionate people in horse racing. The money doesn't mean a thing to them, they don't need another penny. Nothing was "squeezed" from him, the game doesn't work that way. When it was determined that the horse was suffering or that he may suffer in the future they put him down, simple as that. There were many people involved in this decision and the important decisions that had to be made over the last 8 months and there is not a doubt in my mind they had Barbaro's best interest at heart. Animals like people fight to survive, and Barbaro fought as hard as any. One may argue whether it was best to put him down on the track or 8 months later, but to say "keeping this poor beast alive was tragic" and the Jackson's were doing this purely for financial gain is complete ignorance.


I dont care how compassionate the Jacksons the $tud fees were on their minds the entire time. This horse should have been put down 4 months ago. The stud fees would have been 5 times and race purse!

 

____________________
"PAIN HEALS...CHICKS DIG SCARS...GLORY LASTS FOREVER!"


 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3105
(3105 all sites)
Registered: 3/21/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 07:35 PM
I think that the reason that they decided to put him down today was because last night was the first time that he truly suffered. The surgeon and the owner said that for the entire 8 months, he never suffered at all until last night. This past weekend, they found some disease in him, and after Barbaro's suffering last night, the owner said that it was a "no-brainer". It's incredible that a horse can inspire us all.

 

____________________
"Derek Trucks's playing was stunning, like nothing I had ever heard before. He has clearly grown up listening to many different forms of music, and all of them come through in his expression. He seems to have no limit." - Clapton

 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 422
(425 all sites)
Registered: 6/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/29/2007 at 09:19 PM


I dont care how compassionate the Jacksons the $tud fees were on their minds the entire time. This horse should have been put down 4 months ago. The stud fees would have been 5 times and race purse!


illness, I have to respectfully disagree with you here. You are absolutely correct in the Initial decision not to put Barbaro down on the track or right after the incident was because of the "value" of Barbaro and because of what he had done on the racetrack. However, it was very, very evident (although never widely disseminated to the public) that because of the severity and location of the fractures (nevermind the laminitis he later developed) that this horse was not ever going to be able to breed. This was known days after the injury, not weeks or months. It was going to be an impossibility for him to put all his weight on his hind legs to mount a mare. If you've ever seen this process (or perhaps watched the special on HBO) it would make a bit more sense to you. Again, in hindsight, easy to say he should have been put down 4 months ago, but this was a horse that up until 4 or 5 days ago was a happy, comfortable horse. Not able to act entirely as a healthy horse should but on the road to recovery and certainly not suffering. There's a big difference there. It's a very delicate balance (treating these animals) that started moving in the wrong direction, and in the end it was just too much.

Of course it is human nature to consider 100's of millions of dollars in stud fees, so I would never argue this is not something they ever thought about, but these are owners/breeders that have been in this game for 30 years and respect these animals too much to make the decsions they did solely for profit. I'm certain, like any responsible owner they deferred the majority if not all of the medical decisions to Dr. Richardson and his staff.

The bottom line is this type of catastrophe is the ugly side of the game and today was a very sad day for racing, but many strides were made and many medical advancements occurred as a result of trying to save Barbaro's life. Hope fully these advancements can save other horses in the future.

 

____________________
"The next time you throw a train, man, invite me"---Janis Joplin

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5944
(6041 all sites)
Registered: 1/24/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 09:53 AM
Just agreeing with BrendonW here....For the info of those who may not know, Brendon onws a horse, Soulshine, that is currently running the Belmont/Saratoga/Acqueduct circuit.

The Jacksons had to know very early on that the horse would not be able to put full weight on his back ankles, and thus had no value as a stud, or anything else for that matter. The money they sunk in treatment could never come back to them financially, but likely advanced the state of equine surgery to the point it could save some lives later.
I would assume they carried life insurance and could have taken this at the beginning, before they incurred what must be staggering vet bills. Just the opposite of greed.

Sad to see the cynicism and immediate supposition that greed is always the motive. Good guys viewed with immediate suspicion. Not sure what the message is here. Not good.

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1719
(1719 all sites)
Registered: 1/4/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 10:24 AM
RIP

 

____________________
You're My Blue Sky, You're My Sunny Day....
http://www.myspace.com/yournameherehats

http://www.e-z-2-win.com/hats.htm



 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 263
(263 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 10:50 AM
Nice tribute to Barbaro, the horse was true champion.

arbaro, The Heart In the Winner's Circle

By Jane Smiley
Special to The Washington Post
Tuesday, January 30, 2007

Nine years ago, I had a thoroughbred mare who came down with colic in the night, and was too far gone to save by the time she was found at 6 a.m. After she was euthanized, I remember staring at her body, which was stretched out in the grass, running my hands over her. Her coat was shining. Her haunch was rounded and firm. Her feet and legs were perfect. Only that one thing had been wrong, that twist in her gut, but it was enough, and it killed her. So it is with all horses.

They are engineered so close to the margins of what is physically possible that when one thing fails, it can cause the failure of the whole animal.

So it was with Barbaro, who was euthanized yesterday. When we saw his pictures over the last months, his ears were up, he was attentive and beautiful and interested. He looked pretty good, except for those casts.

His vets warned us all along that the odds were against him, but we didn't really believe them. They had hope, too. How could a horse who appeared so full of life break his leg and be so suddenly close to death? His head was fine. His back was fine. His lungs and heart and chest were fine. In fact, after a while, his broken leg was fairly fine. It was another leg that was so worrisome, since the weight of his body constantly bearing down on the delicate structures inside his foot eventually damaged and destroyed them.

A horse's hoof is wondrous structure -- the outside horn is lined with delicate membranes and blood vessels that feed and support the bones of the foot. The bones of the foot are analogous to a person's fingertips, since a horse's knee is analogous to a person's wrist. The racehorse carries a thousand pounds at 35 to 40 miles per hour using a few slender bones supported by an apparatus of ligaments and tendons that have no analogues in human anatomy. Every part of the system depends on every other part. What happened to Barbaro was that the engineering couldn't take it. When it was right, as in the Kentucky Derby, it was perfectly right, and when it became wrong, it became irredeemably wrong.

Some observers have been angered by the outpouring of sympathy toward Barbaro, but there is something extra large about the death of a horse.

And the death of a thoroughbred seems to me to be even more shocking, because thoroughbreds have been bred to press on and prevail where other breeds of horse throw in the towel. When we saw Barbaro in last May's Kentucky Derby fly away from the field so gracefully and effortlessly, he was doing something thoroughbreds have been bred to do for 300 years -- to sense the encroaching fatigue of three-quarters of a mile at top speed and want only to run faster, to push ahead and take the lead.

We say that thoroughbreds have "blood," meaning the DNA of desert Arab horses, and "heart," meaning fortitude, desire and competitive spirit.

It was heart that we saw in Barbaro, not only on Derby Day, but also on Preakness Day, when he stood injured in the middle of the track, touching his toe to the ground and snatching it up again, somehow impatient, somehow not truly aware of the pain, somehow still ready to get going.

I watched the Preakness with some lifelong racing people. When Barbaro was injured, we turned the TV off. All of us had seen it before; everyone who loves racing has seen it all too many times. It is the paradox of racing. His dynamic beauty and his exceptional heart were gifts Barbaro inherited from his racing forebears, who had the luck and toughness to run and win and prove themselves worthy of reproducing.

And then, during his medical saga, he showed that he was intelligent, too. According to a friend of mine who talked to trainer Michael Matz in the summer, Barbaro knew when he needed some pain relief -- he would stand by the sling and shake it until they put him in it, and when he was tired of it, he would shake himself so that it rattled, signaling he was ready to be taken out. And then he would go to his stall and lie down.

Did he want to survive? It seemed as though he did.

In a great racehorse, the heart and mind do the running, and the body tries to hold up.

Yes, to those who don't care about horses, terrible things are happening all over the world these days, and they demand from many people an unprecedented level of endurance, but we horse lovers say: This, too? That this beautiful and innocent animal should also die?

When I think of Barbaro, I like to think also of some of the tough ones -- John Henry, Seabiscuit, a horse I bred a mare to once named Loyal Pal. Among the three of them, they ran hundreds of times. They managed to avoid the bad steps and the bad luck, to go to the races as if a race were a trot in the park, coming back afterward to a bucket of grain and a long nap. Sometimes, thousands of fans thrilled to their exploits. Sometimes, the only ones watching were the owner, the trainer and a few punters. Like Barbaro, they did it because they were born and bred to do it, because a thoroughbred loves to run, and because they didn't know what it meant not to keep on trying.

Jane Smiley is the author of "Horse Heaven," "A Year at the Races" and the forthcoming "Ten Days in the Hills."

btw, here's a time line on his injury and treatment.



The Battle Ends
Barbaro's long attempt at recovery was punctuated by a series of problems and medical maneuvers to prevent and correct them.:

MAY 2006
6: Barbaro wins Kentucky Derby by 6A lengths, his sixth straight win.
20: He shatters three bones in right hind leg at the start of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico.
21: During more than five hours of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, Dean Richardson and his team insert a stainless steel plate and 27 screws into the ankle. Richardson calls chance of survival a "coin toss."
27: A special horseshoe is glued onto Barbaro's left hind hoof to reduce the risk of laminitis, an often fatal disease triggered by uneven weight distribution.

JUNE
13: The cast is replaced for the first time, and Richardson says the leg appears to be healing nicely.

JULY
3: Cast is replaced again; two bent screws are replaced and three new ones are added.
5: Cast is replaced again because of discomfort. A small abscess on sole of the left hind hoof is treated.
b Surgeons treat infection in the broken leg and replace the plate and some screws. A longer, more
supportive cast is applied.
10: Cast replaced again.
12: Severe laminitis in left hind foot necessitates surgery to remove most of the hoof wall.
13: Richardson calls Barbaro's survival "a long shot."
17: Casts on both feet are changed.

AUGUST
9: Barbaro leaves the intensive care unit for the first time to graze outside.
17: Barbaro is taken off pain medications and no longer needs a sling to support his weight.

SEPTEMBER
26: Richardson says right hind leg is nearly healed and says the left hind hoof wall is growing back.

NOVEMBER
6: The cast on the right hind leg is removed.

DECEMBER
13: Richardson says Barbaro may be able to leave the hospital "in the not-so-distant future."

JANUARY 2007
3: A new cast is put on the left hind foot to realign the coffin bone.
10: Laminitis in the left hind foot flares again and more tissue is removed.
13: Another section of the left rear hoof is removed, and a new cast is put on the right hind leg for additional support.
24: After slow improvement, a custom brace is put on the right hind leg.
27: An abscess on his right hind leg requires risky surgery to attach an external brace that would take all weight off the right hind leg.
29: After showing signs of laminitis in his front hooves, Barbaro is euthanized.

SOURCES: University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Associated Press, staff reports

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 832
(832 all sites)
Registered: 7/27/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 11:11 AM
quote:


Sad to see the cynicism and immediate supposition that greed is always the motive. Good guys viewed with immediate suspicion. Not sure what the message is here. Not good.


Very well said Bupp... I totally agree.....hope I'm never looking at the world thru
that cloudy a dang prism ... I'll be about ready to be "put down" by then.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6429
(8674 all sites)
Registered: 12/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 11:18 AM
I think what a lot of people don't realize is the fact that at the core of most (if not all) trainers, racers, breeders, groomers, you name it, is an unbelievable love of horses, first and foremost. Those that are monetarily successful, I'm sure feel very fortunate to be so, but at the end of the day, they do it for the love of the animal.

My aunt has owned and trained trotters her whole life and has lost more money than most people could ever imagine. She will die training horses, because they are her life, not her livelihood.

 

____________________
This one goes to eleven...

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1505
(1505 all sites)
Registered: 7/24/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 11:27 AM
Mr. Ed is on suicide watch
 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 832
(832 all sites)
Registered: 7/27/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 11:28 AM
quote:
I think what a lot of people don't realize is the fact that at the core of most (if not all) trainers, racers, breeders, groomers, you name it, is an unbelievable love of horses, first and foremost. Those that are monetarily successful, I'm sure feel very fortunate to be so, but at the end of the day, they do it for the love of the animal.

My aunt has owned and trained trotters her whole life and has lost more money than most people could ever imagine. She will die training horses, because they are her life, not her livelihood.


you are right Brendan ... animals like that ain't product...warehoused with a bin #

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 14557
(14557 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 01:29 PM
quote:
i really have a lot of compassion for this horse, of course.........


so i'm left wondering......how much money do you think it cost to keep this horse alive? Probably much more than most of us make in a year. If the amount of money that was spent to save this horse was used in a foreign country for health care......think of the number of lives it may have saved.

so yes, i am inspired by this horse to donate some money to africa for TB shots or something.


Forget about foreign country healthcare until we take care of our own lousy health care system. Please, donate to a domestic cause. Many people suffering in our own back yard.

[Edited on 1/30/2007 by sixty8]

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19426
(20204 all sites)
Registered: 3/13/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/30/2007 at 01:42 PM
foreign or domestic aid, whatever. they both need alot of help.

Seeing anything die sucks, but it is the natural order of things.

my very own cat was very close to death three years ago. they told us then to put him down, but it just didnt feel right at that time. I nursed him back to heath, and gave him sub q fluids twice a day for the next three years. When he crashed again, unfortutely, i didnt have the money to pay to keep him alive any longer and had to make a decision this past November to have him put to sleep. it SUCKED.

i hate that money is so often a deciding factor in proper health care. in a perfect world, keeping people and animals healthy would be a no-brainer, and affordable to all.

but i don't want to detract from the fact that yeah, the Horse was great. a real inspiration. i can't wait to go ride a horse now. yay.

 

____________________
you know there just ain't no telling

what a satisfied girl will do.

 
E-Mail User
<<  1    2  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com