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Author: Subject: What do you think of Simon and Garfunkel?

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 04:56 PM


Out of boredom I aired out my Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits cd before Christmas. Much of this music seems to be about as old as me. I think the date on the greatest hits cd is 1972. Anyway, I find that GS cd to be surprisingly tight and the musicianship and songwriting seems to be first rate. Like a lot of music I was first exposed to this songwriter team by my half brother. My brother exposed me to a bunch of classic artists simply by playing them on 8track in his truck. And I also have to admit that Simon and Garfunkel make me feel OLD as hell, but I also feel, what the hey, I am old and why not simply embrace my past?

The cd starts off with Mrs Robinson. This song is simply so tight. The guitar solos here are so tight and the song is so sarcastic and clever. Nevermind that I have never explored the lyrics to see just how stupid or clever the song might be.


Skipping past song two "For Emily" I move on the The Boxer. This too is a pretty cool song. I then skip past "Feelin' Groovy". which is dated just by the term Groovy, on to The Sound of Silence which is so great. And then it is on to Scarborogh Fair/Canticle another amazing song. Homeward Bound is also awesome and live. I find Bridge Over Troubled Water to be a bit on the GAY side, as some of Art Garfunkel's vocals and or songs seem to be. And then it is on the very nice America which Yes even covered. Then playing or skipping two more tunes it is on to Cecilla, a song which is well played but makes me think more of the lack of morals in the 60's.



Anyway, I have thought that it might be fun to explore this duo further. I bought their 1981 dvd reunion concert from Central Park, NY for only $6.99. The young guy who was the cashier looked at the dvd as if it was crap ---I haven't looked at the dvd yet. And I have to admit that as far as the "coolness factor" goes, this is NOT cool in 2006/2007, or am I simply insecure?


Anyway, before airing out my G & S Greatest Hits cd I first played some cuts off of my scratchy Paul Simon GS lp. 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover is still a very clever song. I also love the title of Mother and Child Reunion. And I used to have a 45 of Kodachrome "give me those nice bright colors." And who doesn't like Slip Slidin' Away?


So as a result of my recent "reunion" with Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel,

I only ask what some of you might still think of the value of their music. Has it stood the test of time?


I personally think it has, even though it is still stuck in the dreamy optimism of the 60's.


And for fun I have traded for two of their live shows from around 68 and 69. I hope the girl who is trading these to me sends her address soon.











[Edited on 12/26/2006 by JaminRebel]

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 05:07 PM




Paul Simon's Sunday set at New Orleans' Jazz Fest heralded his new album, Surprise, which arrives in stores Tuesday. Paul Simon, Surprise (* * * out of four) Rhymin' Simon's first album since 2000's You're the One coincides with the 20th anniversary of Graceland. While lacking that landmark's global adventurism, Surprise packs a few surprises of its own, most notably in the verve of Simon's lucid melodies and the emotional and technical purity of his vocals, especially the upper range, where you'd expect some corrosion after 64 years. Lyrics brim with poetic wisdom and sharp observations that continue to elevate Simon above pop's rank-and-file hitmakers. He can be hysterically smug (Sure Don't Feel Like Love) or comical (Outrageous) and equally convincing in romantic tunes or the anguished Wartime Prayers: "People hungry for the voice of God hear lunatics and liars." Simon collaborated with electronic architect Brian Eno, known for frosty avant-garde soundscapes, yet the match yields warmth and charm, particularly in the mesmerizing How Can You Live in the Northeast. No surprise, it's very Simonesque.
Edna Gundersen
















SIMON & GARFUNKEL
United Center / Chicago, IL
October 25, 2003

Concert Review By: Bill Paige



"Old Friends" the name of the tour, their relationship, the crowd, and the opening song.

The evening started with a video montage of socially relevant news events over the years and pictures of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel through their forty plus years of performing together and solo work. The duo appeared as the lights came on and performed "Old Friends." Their seven piece band joined in on the second song for a rockin' version of "A Hazy Shade Of Winter."

The band provided a tight grove for the two as Simon and Garfunkel seemed to get vocally stronger as the show progressed. Their voices do not get as high as they did earlier in their career, but the slight adjustment to the arrangement of the songs made the songs hold up strong and added a little spice.


The crowd, a good part who were quite mature themselves, appeared to be at an intimate setting rather than a packed arena. The songs and dialogue put everyone at ease. Four numbers in and the place was swaying to the tale of " America" as if each person was separately on the journey in that song.

About one-third of the way into the show, Garfunkel talked about some of their musical influences and called out The Everly Brothers who performed " Wake Up Little Susie," "Dream," and "Let It Be Me." Simon and Garfunkel then
came on and sang "Bye Bye Love" along with Don and Phil Everly. This musical interlude was well received by the crowd.

Simon and Garfunkel went into high gear as they continued the show from that point with a charge of "Scarborough Fair," "Homeward Bound," "The Sound Of Silence," and "Mrs. Robinson," which was preceded by another video showing
clips of the movie "The Graduate" and additional photos of the duo.

Paul Simon mentioned to the crowd that in the early stages of his solo career he wrote a lot of songs with Simon and Garfunkel in mind as the band went into "Slip Sliding Away" which worked quite well with Garfunkel's harmonies.
"Paul writes good songs," said Garfunkel, a statement that is somewhat obvious but was genuinely stated. He also brought up the fifty-year friendship that they have had since grade school. "With a few interruptions" he added with a chuckle. Hinting to their on and off again relationship over the past thirty years. Simon chimed in with a remark about a "little arguing."

Garfunkel did most of the talking between songs. Simon began to speak a little more as the show progressed. He also became more animated as the night went on becoming comical on occasion.

The duo ended the main part of their show with "My Little Town" and " Bridge Over Troubled Water." The first encore included "Cecilia" and "The Boxer ." They then stepped away and quickly returned to do "Song For The Asking" and
finally "The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)."

The fans of the two exited "feelin' groovy" after two hours of songs that have been the wallpaper in the rooms of their lives. The smiles on their faces seemed to be contagious.

And it appeared that Simon and Garfunkel might just be "Old Friends" again. At least that is what they portrayed on stage.






 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 05:20 PM
quote:

I only ask what some of you might still think of the value of their music. Has it stood the test of time?


Sure it has. Paul Simon is one of the great singer/songwriters to come out of an era when there were many good ones. There's no shame in enjoying classic S&G tracks.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 05:21 PM




And why did this group break up? And did Paul Simon write most of the songs when the two were together? And is Art Garfunkel straight? What is up with his lp called "Breakaway?" That lp cover looks pretty gay. Was Garfunkel just having fun with that lp cover, or was he trying to tell people something? I know I could look this up, but it's also fun to hear what people think.





 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 05:24 PM



I have never seen a guitar like the one Paul has here. I don't know if I like it or not. I think I like it more than not. It looks like paneling or something. It's very earthy.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 05:53 PM
Simon was the short guy right?

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 06:07 PM
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And why did this group break up? And did Paul Simon write most of the songs when the two were together? And is Art Garfunkel straight?

1 & 2) Paul was the writer/arranger and wanted to get beyond the context of S&G. They had a major reunion tour 2 years ago.
3) Art has been married for many years and has a son that looks just like him. Just one of those "sensitive males".

[Edited on 12/27/2006 by dzobo]

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 06:30 PM
I am from Forest Hills, and went to the same high school S+G did, although a few years later...it always gave me a laugh when I hear the first line from Kodachrome..."When I think back on all the crap I learned in high schoool, its a wonder I can think at all."

Not just because they were my home town guys, but because I always thought they were very talented artists, I alway liked their stuff together, and solo. In fact. Breakaway is clearly one of my favorite recordings. I once met Paul Simon's brother,Eddie, who told me that "Art is definitely 50% of that group". I can't say which of them I like more.

Mitch



[Edited on 12/26/2006 by Mitch]

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 06:32 PM
I see S & G as having been spawned from the same folk roots as the Byrds. My recollection is that their first big hit, Sounds of Silence was done totally acoustic, but the label dubbed in electric instruments.

Their harmonies were always top rate and the material that Simon wrote was always very topical, like Silent Night/Seven O'Clock News Report.

I still enjoy their stuff, but somewhere recently there was a thread about Paul Simon stealing a song from Los Lobos and being very callous about it. For me, it took some of the power away from my appreciation for him.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 07:00 PM
never cared for 'em..found/find them boring as crap...... .....

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 07:02 PM
I liked most of their stuff, never cared for Paul Simon's solo work, and didn't like him as a person. Having said that their harmonies were incredible, thanks in most part to Art Garfarkles voice.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 07:43 PM
quote:


Out of boredom I aired out my Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits cd before Christmas. Much of this music seems to be about as old as me. I think the date on the greatest hits cd is 1972. Anyway, I find that GS cd to be surprisingly tight and the musicianship and songwriting seems to be first rate. Like a lot of music I was first exposed to this songwriter team by my half brother. My brother exposed me to a bunch of classic artists simply by playing them on 8track in his truck. And I also have to admit that Simon and Garfunkel make me feel OLD as hell, but I also feel, what the hey, I am old and why not simply embrace my past?

The cd starts off with Mrs Robinson. This song is simply so tight. The guitar solos here are so tight and the song is so sarcastic and clever. Nevermind that I have never explored the lyrics to see just how stupid or clever the song might be.


Skipping past song two "For Emily" I move on the The Boxer. This too is a pretty cool song. I then skip past "Feelin' Groovy". which is dated just by the term Groovy, on to The Sound of Silence which is so great. And then it is on to Scarborogh Fair/Canticle another amazing song. Homeward Bound is also awesome and live. I find Bridge Over Troubled Water to be a bit on the GAY side, as some of Art Garfunkel's vocals and or songs seem to be. And then it is on the very nice America which Yes even covered. Then playing or skipping two more tunes it is on to Cecilla, a song which is well played but makes me think more of the lack of morals in the 60's.



Anyway, I have thought that it might be fun to explore this duo further. I bought their 1981 dvd reunion concert from Central Park, NY for only $6.99. The young guy who was the cashier looked at the dvd as if it was crap ---I haven't looked at the dvd yet. And I have to admit that as far as the "coolness factor" goes, this is NOT cool in 2006/2007, or am I simply insecure?


Anyway, before airing out my G & S Greatest Hits cd I first played some cuts off of my scratchy Paul Simon GS lp. 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover is still a very clever song. I also love the title of Mother and Child Reunion. And I used to have a 45 of Kodachrome "give me those nice bright colors." And who doesn't like Slip Slidin' Away?


So as a result of my recent "reunion" with Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel,

I only ask what some of you might still think of the value of their music. Has it stood the test of time?


I personally think it has, even though it is still stuck in the dreamy optimism of the 60's.


And for fun I have traded for two of their live shows from around 68 and 69. I hope the girl who is trading these to me sends her address soon.











[Edited on 12/26/2006 by JaminRebel]


It is not hard rock like the Brothers but it is very good stuff. I highly recommend Bookends and Bridge Over Troubled Water, their last two albums that have very high production value and are not dated in the least.

Doug

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 07:45 PM
quote:




And why did this group break up? And did Paul Simon write most of the songs when the two were together? And is Art Garfunkel straight? What is up with his lp called "Breakaway?" That lp cover looks pretty gay. Was Garfunkel just having fun with that lp cover, or was he trying to tell people something? I know I could look this up, but it's also fun to hear what people think.

They broke up for the same reason many do, acrimony. Garfunkel is quite straight. Simon wrote all the songs and plays guitar while Garfunkel just sang. That was part of the problem. Art felt overshadowed.

Doug




 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:08 PM


I can't say that I know a lot about Paul Simon or Art Garfunkel, but I can say that I know they were the sh!t for quite a few years running. It was a long time ago now, but back in the day Paul Simon was no small celebrity when he was the musical guest on Saturday Night Live. Paul was the the special musical guest a few times.


Also, Paul Simon caught some heat for popularizing African music on one of his albums. I know some of you know something about this. It may be true that later on Paul Simon got accussed of ripping off other artists. I couldn't tell you what is true and what is not, but Paul Simon was a pretty cool dude when I was growing up in the 70's.




Kodachrome..."When I think back on all the crap I learned in high schoool, its a wonder I can think at all."


And yeah, this is the sort of clever song writing that I was talking about. That's a first line hook if I've ever heard one. If that does SCREAM cool to a kid what does? There was a reason I went out and bought that 45 once.


And I don't mean to dismiss Art Garfunkel, but Paul Simon has overshadowed the crap out of him for their entire career.




And how many people know that Paul Simon married Edie Brickell? And are those two still together? I read some criticism of their union on Amazon cd review that were written by fans. Edie Brickell fans have blamed her lamer musical endeavors on her union with Paul. Who knows how much their union has affected her music.



 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:24 PM
Beautiful music. Don't care for Simon at all, though.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:28 PM




Yeah, but Paul Simon didn't need a lot of understanding or approval from most of us. I guess he may be conceited, or bitter, but life goes on. Paul was married to Carrie Fisher. I just googled this up. Dang, CF was a minor babe!

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:29 PM
i lost a lot of respect for paul simon after reading this thread on the forum
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=v iewthread&tid=52358#pid from this interview with steve berlin from los lobos.
http://www.jambase.com/headsup.asp?storyID=9391&pageNum=1

Speaking of doing a lot of different records and working with a lot of amazing songwriters, I own a ton of the records that you've done over the years. One, in particular, I'd like to ask you about is Paul Simon's Graceland. I obsessed over that thing when I was young. Do you have any recollections of working on it?

Oh, I have plenty of recollections of working on that one. I don't know if you heard the stories, but it was not a pleasant deal for us. I mean he [Simon] quite literally and in no way do I exaggerate when I say he stole the songs from us.

Really...




Yeah. And you know, going into it, I had an enormous amount of respect for the guy. The early records were amazing, I loved his solo records, and I truly thought he was one of the greatest gifts to American music that there was.

At the time, we were high on the musical food chain. Paul had just come off One Trick Pony and was kind of floundering. People forget, before Graceland, he was viewed as a colossal failure. He was low. So when we were approached to do it, I was a way bigger fan than anybody else in the band. We got approached by Lenny Waronker and Mo Ostin who ran our record company [Warner Bros.], and this is the way these guys would talk "It would mean a lot to the family if you guys would do this for us." And we thought, "Ok well, it's for the family, so we'll do it." It sounds so unbelievably nave and ridiculous that that would be enough of a reason to go to the studio with him.

We go into the studio, and he had quite literally nothing. I mean, he had no ideas, no concepts, and said, "Well, let's just jam." We said, "We don't really do that." When we jam, we'll switch instruments. Dave will play drums, I'll play something. We don't really jam. Especially in that era. Louie will be the first to tell you this he was made to play drums. They forced him to play drums. He's not really a drummer by trade. He's never practiced a moment in his life. Not once in his life did he sit down at the drums because of his love for drumming. The other three guys made him play drums in the early days, so he sort of became drummer by default. He hates playing the instrument, I think. Again, you should ask him, but I don't ever ever, ever get the sense that he was one of those dyed-in-the-wool, John Bonham, let's-play-drums-for-three-days-straight kind of guys. So consequently, as the core band was comprised then, we never jammed - never ever. Not by accident, not even at soundcheck. We would always just play a song.

So Paul was like, "Let's just jam," and we're like, "Oh jeez. Well alright, let's see what we can do." And it was not good because Louie wasn't comfortable. None of us were comfortable, it wasn't just Louie. It was like this very alien environment to us. Paul was a very strange guy. Paul's engineer was even stranger than Paul, and he just seemed to have no clue - no focus, no design, no real nothing. He had just done a few of the African songs that hadn't become songs yet. Those were literally jams. Or what the world came to know and I don't think really got exposed enough, is that those are actually songs by a lot of those artists that he just approved of. So that's kind of what he was doing. It was very patrician, material sort of viewpoint. Like, because I'm gonna put my stamp on it, they're now my songs. But that's literally how he approached this stuff.

I remember he played me the one he did by John Hart, and I know John Hart, the last song on the record. He goes, "Yeah, I did this in Louisiana with this zy decko guy." And he kept saying it over and over. And I remember having to tell him, "Paul, it's pronounced zydeco. It's not zy decko, it's zydeco." I mean that's how incredibly dilettante he was about this stuff. The guy was clueless.

Speaking of doing a lot of different records and working with a lot of amazing songwriters, I own a ton of the records that you've done over the years. One, in particular, I'd like to ask you about is Paul Simon's Graceland. I obsessed over that thing when I was young. Do you have any recollections of working on it?

Oh, I have plenty of recollections of working on that one. I don't know if you heard the stories, but it was not a pleasant deal for us. I mean he [Simon] quite literally and in no way do I exaggerate when I say he stole the songs from us.

Really...



Yeah. And you know, going into it, I had an enormous amount of respect for the guy. The early records were amazing, I loved his solo records, and I truly thought he was one of the greatest gifts to American music that there was.

At the time, we were high on the musical food chain. Paul had just come off One Trick Pony and was kind of floundering. People forget, before Graceland, he was viewed as a colossal failure. He was low. So when we were approached to do it, I was a way bigger fan than anybody else in the band. We got approached by Lenny Waronker and Mo Ostin who ran our record company [Warner Bros.], and this is the way these guys would talk "It would mean a lot to the family if you guys would do this for us." And we thought, "Ok well, it's for the family, so we'll do it." It sounds so unbelievably nave and ridiculous that that would be enough of a reason to go to the studio with him.

We go into the studio, and he had quite literally nothing. I mean, he had no ideas, no concepts, and said, "Well, let's just jam." We said, "We don't really do that." When we jam, we'll switch instruments. Dave will play drums, I'll play something. We don't really jam. Especially in that era. Louie will be the first to tell you this he was made to play drums. They forced him to play drums. He's not really a drummer by trade. He's never practiced a moment in his life. Not once in his life did he sit down at the drums because of his love for drumming. The other three guys made him play drums in the early days, so he sort of became drummer by default. He hates playing the instrument, I think. Again, you should ask him, but I don't ever ever, ever get the sense that he was one of those dyed-in-the-wool, John Bonham, let's-play-drums-for-three-days-straight kind of guys. So consequently, as the core band was comprised then, we never jammed - never ever. Not by accident, not even at soundcheck. We would always just play a song.

So Paul was like, "Let's just jam," and we're like, "Oh jeez. Well alright, let's see what we can do." And it was not good because Louie wasn't comfortable. None of us were comfortable, it wasn't just Louie. It was like this very alien environment to us. Paul was a very strange guy. Paul's engineer was even stranger than Paul, and he just seemed to have no clue - no focus, no design, no real nothing. He had just done a few of the African songs that hadn't become songs yet. Those were literally jams. Or what the world came to know and I don't think really got exposed enough, is that those are actually songs by a lot of those artists that he just approved of. So that's kind of what he was doing. It was very patrician, material sort of viewpoint. Like, because I'm gonna put my stamp on it, they're now my songs. But that's literally how he approached this stuff.

I remember he played me the one he did by John Hart, and I know John Hart, the last song on the record. He goes, "Yeah, I did this in Louisiana with this zy decko guy." And he kept saying it over and over. And I remember having to tell him, "Paul, it's pronounced zydeco. It's not zy decko, it's zydeco." I mean that's how incredibly dilettante he was about this stuff. The guy was clueless.

Wow. You're kidding me?

Clue... less about what he was doing. He knew what he wanted to do, but it was not in any way like, "Here's my idea. Here's this great vision I have for this record, come with me."



About two hours into it, the guys are like, "You gotta call Lenny right now. You gotta get us out of this. We can't do this. This is a joke. This is a waste of time." And this was like two hours into the session that they wanted me to call Lenny. What am I going to tell Lenny? It was a favor to him. What am I going to say, "Paul's a **** ing idiot?"

Somehow or other, we got through the day with nothing. I mean, literally, nothing. We would do stuff like try an idea out and run it around for 45 minutes, and Paul would go "Eh... I don't like it. Let's do something else." And it was so frustrating. Even when we'd catch a glimpse of something that might turn into something, he would just lose interest. A kitten-and-the-string kinda thing.

So that's day one. We leave there and it's like, "Ok, we're done. We're never coming back." I called Lenny and said it really wasn't very good. We really didn't get anything you could call a song or even close to a song. I don't think Paul likes us very much. And frankly, I don't think we like him very much. Can we just say, 'Thanks for the memories' and split?" And he was like, "Man, you gotta hang in there. Paul really does respect you. It's just the way he is. I'll talk to him." And we were like, "Oh man, please Lenny. It's not working." Meanwhile, we're not getting paid for this. There was no discussion like we're gonna cash in or anything like that. It was very labor-of-love.

Really...?

Yeah. Don't ask me why. God knows it would have made it a lot easier to be there.

And Lenny put you guys together thinking it would be a good match?



Well, "It would be good for the family." That was it. So we go back in the second day wondering why we're there. It was ridiculous. I think David starts playing "The Myth of the Fingerprints," or whatever he ended up calling it. That was one of our songs. That year, that was a song we started working on By Light of the Moon. So that was like an existing Lobos sketch of an idea that we had already started doing. I don't think there were any recordings of it, but we had messed around with it. We knew we were gonna do it. It was gonna turn into a song. Paul goes, "Hey, what's that?" We start playing what we have of it, and it is exactly what you hear on the record. So we're like, "Oh, ok. We'll share this song."

Good way to get out of the studio, though...

Yeah. But it was very clear to us, at the moment, we're thinking he's doing one of our songs. It would be like if he did "Will the Wolf Survive?" Literally. A few months later, the record comes out and says "Words and Music by Paul Simon." We were like, "What the **** is this?"

We tried calling him, and we can't find him. Weeks go by and our managers can't find him. We finally track him down and ask him about our song, and he goes, "Sue me. See what happens."

What?! Come on...

That's what he said. He said, "You don't like it? Sue me. You'll see what happens." We were floored. We had no idea. The record comes out, and he's a big hit. Retroactively, he had to give songwriting credit to all the African guys he stole from that were working on it and everyone seemed to forget. But that's the kind of person he is. He's the world's biggest **** , basically.




So we go back to Lenny and say, "Hey listen, you stuck us in the studio with this **** ing idiot for two days. We tried to get out of it, you made us stay in there, and then he steals our song?! What the hell?!" And Lenny's always a politician. He made us forget about it long enough that it went away. But to this day, I do not believe we have gotten paid for it. We certainly didn't get songwriting credit for it. And it remains an enormous bone that sticks in our craw. Had he even given us a millionth of what the song and the record became, I think we would have been if nothing else - much richer, but much happier about the whole thing.

Have you guys seen him since then?

No. Never run into him. I'll tell you, if the guys ever did run into him, I wouldn't want to be him, that's for sure.

That's an amazing story. I can't believe I never heard it before.

We had every right and reason to sue him, and Lenny goes, "It's bad for the family." When we told the story in that era, when this was going down, we were doing interviews and telling the truth. And Lenny goes, "Hey guys, I really need you to stop talking about it. It's bad for the family."

Amazing. Talk about bad for the family.

I know. Again, it's just so incredible how nave we were back then. You can't even imagine that era of music when you'd actually listen to your record company president who told you to shut up because "it's bad for the family." Now, I'd tell him to go **** himself.

That's our version of it. I'd love to hear Paul's version of it.

But he's much richer now and could probably give a **** about it. It's still one of those things where I've not forgiven anyone involved in it. It still remains. I haven't let it go, as you can tell. It was just so wrong and so rude, and so unnecessary. It is an amazing moment in our history.

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:32 PM
I always liked the music of S&G together, but I never cared for Paul's solo stuff. Saw the Old Friends tour a few years back, and I was honestly blown away by the magic the two of them made together on stage that night. You know how pissed off we all get about the talking that goes on during shows? No one was talking that night, just listening.

[Edited on 12/27/2006 by hankpipes]

 

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  posted on 12/26/2006 at 09:37 PM
Becks, thanks for sharing that. That's awful. He's just that type of guy. Don't care for him at all.

 

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  posted on 12/27/2006 at 12:45 AM
Besides always enjoying S&G togethe myself, I was also impressed on how they suvived, and stayed on the charts through many changes in music, including Heavy Metal. They did it staying true to their own style, and not trying to keep up with the changes. On their own.. there were brief moments. I use to go to his brother Eddies guitar study center in NYC mid 70's and he would show up from time to time...I agree with your evaluation of the man. Eddie was cool

 

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  posted on 12/27/2006 at 03:29 AM



Well, I really didn't want to spark a debate about song theft. And I'm not trying to wear blinders either but this thread was about, let's just say, SONGS THAT PAUL SIMON and ART GARFUNKEL probably DIDN'T STEAL.


And in the vein of THEFT, I had a guy once at the Beach Blvd Jax, FL Flea Market swear to me outright that Allen Collins, and Ronnie Van Zant and or Skynryd STOLE Freebird from Rickey Medlocke/Blackfoot. The guy that told me got all serioius and kind of angry and a bit weird. He said he knew Charlie Hargrett or whatever his name is, and OK, that would be a BIG deal if it could be proved. Sad, but it would be a story that has gone untold. Either way Skynyrd made Freebird the nuisance that it is today. Personally I think Freebird is a great song, not with JVZ on vocals, but classic versions are just that.



 

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  posted on 12/27/2006 at 07:43 AM
Simon and Garfunkel made really good music. They will forever have their place in history and it has stood up to the test of time very well.

While Simon has gone on to have an incredible career Garfunkel has done well for himself to. I remember when he came out with Lefty back in the late 80s. It was really a good album but never got the play it deserved.

 

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  posted on 12/27/2006 at 07:58 AM
I've always really liked S&G music, as well as Simon's solo career stuff. Never listened to Garfunkel solo material.
 

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  posted on 12/27/2006 at 08:35 AM
They made some wonderful music together.... Paul Simon has written some great songs... Catch their free concert from Central Park when you can...

 

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  posted on 12/28/2006 at 07:29 PM
I think they made some amazing music together. Not sure what Art is up to today, but I've seen Paul a few times since their split. Once right after Rythym of the Saints and the band he had with him (something like 18 pieces) was just absolutely amazing - put it on my list for one of my best live shows (this is a long list, granted). Also, always liked Graceland.

 

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