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Author: Subject: Art Museums

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 12/16/2006 at 10:37 PM
I love going to art museums.

This is from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

Elizabeth Farren (born about 1759, died 1829), Later Countess of Derby, 1790
Sir Thomas Lawrence (English, 1769–1830)
Bequest of Edward S. Harkness, 1940 (50.135.5)

 
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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/16/2006 at 11:01 PM
And this from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam

The painting itself is huge and covers an entire wall in the museum and has been cut/trimmed in it's life. The artist painted it for a government office and when he delivered it, it was too big to fit in the doors so they trimmed it.

Title
The Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch, known as the 'Night Watch'

Year 1642

Artist Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn


[Edited on 12/17/2006 by heineken515]

[Edited on 12/17/2006 by heineken515]

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/17/2006 at 08:46 AM
Here's another one from the Rijksmuseum some will recognize.

Contrary to what most people who recognize it think, it is not called The Dutchmasters.

Title The Sampling Officials

Year 1662

Artist Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

 

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  posted on 12/17/2006 at 12:04 PM
One that I really like



Salvador Dalí Museum
1000 Third Street South
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701-4901

 

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  posted on 12/17/2006 at 12:48 PM
This one's from my den!


I am trying to get the artist to do a Duane. Stay tuned!

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/17/2006 at 02:29 PM
And another favorite, not sure if it's in a museum...

"Meejay Dr. Gonzo"
Ralph Steadman

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/17/2006 at 07:23 PM
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


"Rockwell and the Red Sox" honors Opening Day of the World Champion Boston Red Sox season. The display centers on The Rookie by beloved American artist Norman Rockwell. This famous painting, briefly on loan to the Museum and rarely seen in Boston, depicts the Red Sox locker room in 1957. The image appeared that year on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post.




[Edited on 12/18/2006 by susea]

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 09:43 AM
heineken, I like the museums, too. When I was a kid, my parents had a large book of masterpieces of painting, and I always liked those "Dutch masters," with their beards and Pilgrim clothes. Later you start to get a sense of what an incredible painter Rembrandt was.

The major museum I'm most familiar with (but haven't been to in a couple years) is the Art Institute of Chicago. Actually, I went there last summer. My car had broken down, and I took a Metra (commuter) train from my brother's place out in the suburbs into downtown and had a 4-hour wait until my Amtrak train back to my town.

So, since it was a Tuesday, the free-admission day at the Art Institute, I walked across the Loop. When still a half block away from the AIC, though, I could see a giant banner across the front, which turned out to read something like,
"Have you heard? The Art Institute of Chicago has
FREE ADMISSION THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
evenings 5-8! Blah blah blah"

Tuesday wasn't free day anymore! Instead of going inside and "donating" the suggested $12 or whatever for a 2-hour visit, I decided to walk around downtown some more. In fact, the first place I went inside was the Chicago Cultural Center, which has multiple galleries of contemporary artists and historical exhibits, besides being a jewel of a building itself.

Anyway, it was no AIC, but it's hard not to find great things to do around the Loop.

Here's one painting at the AIC that I almost always try to spend some time with:



Frederic Edwin Church
View of Cotopaxi, 1857
Oil on canvas
62.2 x 92.7 cm (~26 X 39 in.)

AIC page
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/amer/highlight_item?acc=1919.753&page= 3
Biggest version I could find on the net
http://cgfa.sunsite.dk/c/church5.jpg
Google results page for "Frederic Church Cotopaxi"
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=Frederic%20Church%20Cotopaxi&ie=UTF -8&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi

As you can see by the Google page, Church used the Ecuadoran volcano Cotopaxi in multiple compositions. In fact, I'll post a couple others in a sec. Needless to say, the AIC painting has to be seen in person to be believed how much skill Church has--such a master of detail in all aspects of the plant life and everything. It's great that if you don't scare the guards, you can put your face almost right up to the canvas. This particular painting isn't tremendously huge, but there is so much spatial depth in it,
from the foreground,
across the water,
up the waterfall or other valleys,
across the plains,
up the foothills,
and up to the peak of Cotopaxi.





Cotopaxi, 1855
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Larger
http://geosciences.missouristate.edu/faculty/Evans/images/church_cotopaxi.j pg
Interactive zoom page
http://www.mfah.org/collection.asp?par1=3&par2=&par3=36&par6=3&par4=274&lgc =4¤tPage=2




Cotopaxi, 1855
Natl. Mus. of American Art, Smithsonian, DC
28 x 43 in.

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 09:45 AM


The Heart of the Andes, watercolor (sketch)
National Gallery of Art, DC
19 X 36 in.




Heart of the Andes, 1859
Metropolitan Museum of Art
66 X 119 in.!

Very large image; here you can start to get a sense of Church's handling of detail
http://sandstead.com/images/metropolitan/CHURCH_Heart_of_the_Andes_1859_LS_ d2h_.jpg
Met page with interactive zoom
http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/viewOne.asp?dep=2&viewMode=1&item=09% 2E95

 

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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 10:08 AM
With the Civil War ramping up, the grandeur of Church's landscapes took on a less serene tone in general, and his depiction of Cotopaxi was now of an active volcano bellowing smoke like artillery, dimming the sun and turning the sky lurid shades of yellow and red.




Oil Study for Cotopaxi, 1861
Collection of Nelson C. White





Cotopaxi, 1862
Detroit Institute of Arts
48 X 85 in.

 

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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 10:17 AM
I was lucky enough to see the Girodet: Romantic Rebel exhibit at the Met this summer in NY. I can post images but they really do her work no justice. If the paintings are still touring try to see them .. unreal - we were speechless walking into the gallery for the first time

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 10:24 AM
Art museums are favorite haunts for Donna and myself. Should you find yourself in Birmingham, AL - we have a very nice, medium size museum that houses a very fine permanent collection. We also get some rather exclusive exhibitions, too.

Oh yeah - there is no admission. You are free to donate into the "fishbowl" if you feel like it, but there is no admission.

Here's one of my favorites, "Looking Down Yosemite Valley", by Albert Bierdstadt. This painting is HUGE!

 

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People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2006 at 03:19 PM
Cincinnati has over 100 galleries and two top-notch museums. The Cincinnati Art Museum has an excellent collection. Starting in February, the museum will be opening an exhibition on the watercolors and drawings of Andrew Wyeth, whose 'Lady In The Grass' reprint, titled "Christina’s World," is on my wall as I speak. That famous drawing will be a big part of the exhibit.

quote:
www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org


The Collection
Discover your community’s vast and growing art collection. Since 1881, the Cincinnati Art Museum’s commitment to the community and its members as a world-class art museum has inspired acquisitions and additions to its ever-changing collection of art.

One of the oldest arts institutions in the United States, the Cincinnati Art Museum has a rich collection of more than sixty thousand works of art, spanning six thousand years. This unique collection includes the ancient art of Egypt, Greece, and Rome as well as Near and Far Eastern art, art of Africa and the Americas, costume and textiles, prints, drawings, photographs, painting, sculpture, decorative art, and contemporary art.

The painting collection includes works by European old masters such as Titian, van Dyck, Hals, Rubens, and Gainsborough, as well as nineteenth- and twentieth-century works by Picasso, Renoir, Derain, Braque, Modigliani, Miró, and Chagall. The American collection holds works by Copley, Cole, Harnett, Wyeth, Wood, Hopper, Diebenkorn, and Rothko, as well as major artists from the 1970s and 1980s.

Some of the Art Museum’s most notable gems include the only collection of ancient Nabataean art outside of Jordan, the renowned Herbert Greer French collection of old master prints, and a fine collection of European and American portrait miniatures.

Andrew Wyeth Watercolors and Drawings
Selections from the Marunuma Art Park, Collection, Japan
February 3 to May 6, 2007


See 114 watercolors and drawings by American master artist Andrew Wyeth, inspired by the world of Christina and Alvaro Olson in Cushing, Main. This exhibition explores the artist’s ongoing fascination with the Olson’s everyday activities, domestic interiors, and utilitarian objects. Spanning three decades of his career, the works range from stand-alone watercolors to preliminary notations and detailed studies that demonstrate how the artist’s compositions evolved into finished tempera paintings. The exhibition includes ten studies for the painting Christina’s World (1948) as seen in early compositional notations, detailed figures, and arm studies and the final watercolor sketch of Christina.





The other great museum in Cincinnati is the Taft Museum. It has an excellent collection including some Turners. J.M.W.Turner was one of the preeminent British landscape and nature painters of the late 1700-early 1800's.

quote:
www.taftmuseum.org


The Taft Museum of Art's collections include the following, housed in the Baum-Longworth-Taft House, a National Historic Landmark built around 1820 in the Palladian style:

European old master paintings
19th-century American paintings
Chinese ceramics and works of art
European decorative arts
17th- through 19th-century watches
European and American sculptures
pieces of early-19th-century American furniture



I also love Dali, and have went to see a couple of his paintings in the Smithsonian in DC. My brother finally returned a book of Dali paintings that is mine only a week or so ago. As for now, I have to go and put some crutches under my nose and eyelids as my face is about to melt.

Cheers,
Derek H

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/21/2006 at 10:09 AM
Rusty, Bierstadt must be my favorite American landscapist after Church. Whereas Church started out east and went to South America, the Mediterranean, and the high latitudes (Newfoundland, for example) for exotic landscape subject matter, Bierstadt went out west, especially to the Rockies and, like with the picture you show, California.

Bierstadt's and Church's techniques are very highly developed, both able to paint very realistically and beautifully, but they also put a lot of imagination and feeling into their compositions--bringing out the natural drama of majestic scenes. With the paintings that are very large in size, especially, you can really feel drawn into them.

Your Birmingham painting of the Yosemite Valley looks very familiar, Rusty. I like how he puts the sun half behind that cliff, and the way the distance glows and the sunlight flows up through the valley toward "our" encampment.

Here's a more intimate outdoor scene from the Art Institute of Chicago.



Mountain Brook, 1863
Oil on canvas
111.8 x 91.4 cm (~47 x 38 in.)

Holy cow--you want to see some Bierstadt?! There are a lot of paintings of Yosemite at this site, but I think the Birmingham one may be the masterpiece.
http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/glenda/bierstadt/bierstadt.html

Compare the painting below to the Birmingham one--he's standing in almost the same spot, just up and back a mile or two, and a bit to the left. But what happened to that pinnacle to the left? It's not like the 1875 pine tree could be blocking it from view. Albert could be taking artistic license with the composition.

.

Left:
Looking down Yosemite Valley, 1865
Right: Yosemite Valley, 1875
Wait, that's not the Birmingham painting of the same name and year. Compare to yours . The one above is probably a nearly final oil sketch.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 12/21/2006 at 10:58 AM
quote:


The Heart of the Andes, watercolor (sketch)
National Gallery of Art, DC
19 X 36 in.




Heart of the Andes, 1859
Metropolitan Museum of Art
66 X 119 in.!

Very large image; here you can start to get a sense of Church's handling of detail
http://sandstead.com/images/metropolitan/CHURCH_Heart_of_the_Andes_1859_LS_ d2h_.jpg
Met page with interactive zoom
http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/viewOne.asp?dep=2&viewMode=1&item=09% 2E95



man, I love the Mountain and Valley with river scenes. When I use to attend a lot of meeting when I got bored I would always doodle scenes like those. No where as good, but in pencil for me was pretty good, Considering I am not artist. I'm no Jack Kennedy either.
Great Pictures.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 12/21/2006 at 11:12 AM
Hey Peter, Bierstadt (like Monet with the Haystacks) did several versions or studies of Yosemite. I'm not sure, but I think the Birmingham museum has a couple of the smaller paintings also. This painitng was kind of hidden in the Birmingham Library (big, downtown branch) for years before someone noticed it for what it is. I've spent a lot of time just sitting in front of it studying it.

 

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Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/21/2006 at 10:48 PM
Despite the whole hate the french thing...Paris is the city to go to for museums...

This from the Louvre...the largest museum in the world, former home to Napolean, seems fitting to share a painting of his wife...

Pierre-Paul Prud'hon
Cluny (Saône-et-Loire), 1758 - Paris, 1823

The Empress Josephine (1763-1814)
1805
© Musée du Louvre/A. Dequier - M. Bard

Alright, I might be wrong on the residence part...alot of other rulers of France have lived there, I guess I'm not sure if Napolean lived there...I know they have a bunch of rooms that depict his living quarters etc.

[Edited on 12/22/2006 by heineken515]

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 09:39 AM
awesome thread.

i love the Met.

hey, if you happen to run across a print of Dorthea Tannings SUNFLOWERS, let me know.

peas,
linnie

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 10:22 AM
I haven't made it to Paris yet, but it's in the works.

My two favorite museums (that I have visited) are the Art Institute in Chicago and the Prado in Madrid. The Tate in London, the Gugenheim (NY) and the Woodruff (Atlanta) are also on my list. Birmingham's museum ain't too shabby, either!

 

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Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Extreme Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 11:01 AM
I've always loved art museums. Seeing art in person is liking hearing music live. I went to the Art Museum in Chicago about 20 years ago and saw a Georgia O'Keefe exhibit. I think it was to commemorate her 100th birthday...I can remember how it felt to look at this




I was also lucky enough to catch an exhibit of Rembrandt etchings a few years ago.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 11:35 AM
LOVE art museums! This is a great thread - thanks for sharing these different pieces, everyone. Have spent a lot of time in the local art museum and Chicago's art museum over the years and looking forward to Metropolitan in March and someday - Europe. Yosemite is a special place for me so really enjoyed the Bierstadt's! Thanks!

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 11:39 AM
quote:
And another favorite, not sure if it's in a museum...

"Meejay Dr. Gonzo"
Ralph Steadman


one of my prized possesions is my White Rabbit by Steadman, signed in blood red splatter.....

ralphsteadman.com

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 11:55 AM
Steadman always makes me a) laugh and b) flash to Fear and Loathing in LV

 

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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 12:43 PM
quote:
the Gugenheim (NY


Funny you should mention that. I just designed the new addition to the Gugenheim.

GC

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/22/2006 at 12:58 PM


Nelson Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City , Missouri and the famed " Shuttlecock".
This musem is straight across from Volker Park where the free Sunday Afternoon outdoor concerts took place.



[Edited on 12/22/2006 by Haisija]

 

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If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 
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