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Author: Subject: This Day in Baseball Part 2





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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 04:59 PM
Thats pitchers and catchers right?

AND WHICH ONE ARE YOU??..

LOL! SORRY, It was a hanging curve, I had to hit it!

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 05:05 PM
The Moose is so on the fence. What did he sign..3 yrs? avg 15 per...win a ring,.. or two.
yeah..he could make it!
2003..game 7 American leaugue championship series..comes in relief ..lol (Torre promised him he wouldn't bring him in a middle of an inning) 2 men on..no outs...we're down already, and gets out of it. He made the Yankee HOF off that one...AAron F****** Boone!!!

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 05:51 PM
Moose signed for two more years.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 05:58 PM
cool..grazie.
quote:
Moose signed for two more years.


 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 06:01 PM
Braves trade LaRoche to Bucs for Gonzalez.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2734082

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 06:04 PM
..was just coming back to post that... I know the Braves were after Milky, hmmmm...ya think?

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 06:18 PM
I hope not! I would rather have them keep him. But if they trade him I would rather get a starter instead. Dontrelle or Santana come to mind. If they are willing to trade them.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 06:47 PM
yeah..I know, but this kid Gonzalaz can be the next heir to the throne..Mo's throne.
The few times I seen him pitch, he really opened my eyes. I love Milkey, have a "got Milkey ?" tee shirt , and he looks special..but an arm like this. I might have to do it.
Dontrell I think would be the one available because of the 1 year deal, and he could DH, or pich hit..lol
The Twins with Liriano out can't trade Santana now if they wanted to.
It's going to be a very interesting yr..
2008 ALL STAR GAME, TO BE HELD AT YANKEE STADIUM!! THE STADIUMS LAST YEAR!
WOW...THAT GAME COULD PAY FOR HALF MY SEASON TICKETS!!..HA, I'LL SELL ALL 4!

[Edited on 1/17/2007 by SkyPuppy]

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 08:25 PM
Deals closed by a couple closers...

Lidge, Astros avoid arbitration
Closer Brad Lidge and the Houston Astros came to terms on a one-year, $5.35 million contract Tuesday and avoided arbitration hearings, according to the Globe's Nick Cafardo. The Red Sox have shown an interest in Lidge this offseason, but Houston G.M. Tim Purpura has insisted he would not part with his closer.

Gonzalez, Pirates agree to terms
Closer Mike Gonzalez agreed to terms with the Pittsburgh Pirates for 2007, avoiding salary arbitration. Gonzalez will make $2.35 million this season, up from $347,000 in 2006.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 10:10 PM
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..was just coming back to post that... I know the Braves were after Milky, hmmmm...ya think?


God, I hope they dont trade Melky.. That kid has talent AND a good attitude. Thats kind of hard to come by these days

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 10:17 PM
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..was just coming back to post that... I know the Braves were after Milky, hmmmm...ya think?


God, I hope they dont trade Melky.. That kid has talent AND a good attitude. Thats kind of hard to come by these days


Not only that. He can PLAY in NY! Many cant!

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 10:20 PM
quote:
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..was just coming back to post that... I know the Braves were after Milky, hmmmm...ya think?


God, I hope they dont trade Melky.. That kid has talent AND a good attitude. Thats kind of hard to come by these days


Not only that. He can PLAY in NY! Many cant!


I think Abreu's contract is only through 07.. I am thinking either they extend that by the trading dreadline or he is gone..

I like him, but would rather have Melky out there. Much younger,more of a future

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 10:27 PM
Abreu is only signed through this year? If they keep Melky they will not resign him.

Remember Cashman's new motto. Younger and cheaper

 

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  posted on 1/17/2007 at 10:30 PM
Abreu has a 16M option( club) for 08

I dont see that happening

http://mlbcontracts.blogspot.com/2005/01/new-york-yankees_11139816867886004 0.html


Bobby Abreu of
5 years/$64M (2003-07), plus $16M 2008 club option

acquired in trade 7/06
Yankees to pay salary remaining on Abreu's contract (about $4.4M for 2006, $15M for 2007 and $16M salary or $2M buyout for 2008)
Phillies to pay Abreu about $1.5M to waive his no-trade clause

$3M signing bonus
03:$8.5M, 04:$10M, 05:$12.5M, 06:$13M, 07:$15M,
08:$16M club option ($2M buyout)
complete no-trade clause

MVP incentive: $0.275M for 1st, $0.15M for 2nd, $0.1M for 3rd
3 years/$14.2M (2000-02)
$1M signing bonus
00:$2.6M, 01:$4.65, 02:$6M
agent: Peter Greenberg

ML service: 9.165


[Edited on 1/18/2007 by WharfRat]

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 12:46 AM
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quote:
quote:
Both the Goose and Lee Smith should be in the hall already.



Goose should get in next year

Lee Smith I am not so sure. The votes for Goose have risen every year, Lee's have not.



And that's just wrong. Smith belongs in there as much as any reliever.


You're both right on target.
Goose will get in ... ... as he deserves.
And Smith will be left out ... ... and that IS just wrong.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 06:56 AM
quote:
Abreu has a 16M option( club) for 08

I dont see that happening

http://mlbcontracts.blogspot.com/2005/01/new-york-yankees_11139816867886004 0.html


[Edited on 1/18/2007 by WharfRat]



Yep you are right. I dont seee that happening unless he has a huge year.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:30 AM
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Doesn't matter. How many HOF'er retired while active?



All of them except for Clemente.


That's my point. Why make an exception for him? Why not wait 5 years like everyone else? Was he so much more exceptional than anyone else? No. Why is Clemente so much more deserving than anyone else? Because he died?



Not just because he died, but more importantly the circumstances of his death...

December 31, 1999

Tonight is not only New Year’s Eve and the last night of the 20th Century, but also the 27th anniversary of Roberto Clemente’s tragic death. Though the Pittsburgh Pirate right fielder did plenty on the field to leave behind a strong legacy, it was his off-the-field contributions that touched the hearts of everyone – even if it took until the very end to realize it.

Clemente, an ever-so proud black Puerto Rican, worked tirelessly to help his people and try to erase bigotry toward his race. He once said, "I work with the rich and live among the poor." Believe him!

His death is how most people remember Clemente; that he sacrificed his own life to save the life of others. There is certainly honor and admiration in that.

Others choose to remember his cannon arm, which helped Clemente garner 12 consecutive Gold Gloves. Others choose to remember his non-scientific swing, which netted nothing but line drives to the tune of four batting titles, 12 All-Star selections, an MVP Award and exactly 3,000 hits.

"We're never going to see another Roberto Clemente," said fellow Latin Hall of Famer Juan Marichal. "I saw Roberto play right field, but nobody can play right field like Roberto Clemente. I always say there is only one Willie Mays and only one Roberto Clemente."

Others choose to remember his hustle, his desire to win and his drive to be recognized for the sake and pride of his people. Others simply choose to remember him by how he personally touched them.

For those reasons, Clemente is still recognized as one of the world's best-known and remembered humanitarians, illuminating in our heart even more as our world loses a bit of its innocence each day.

Yes, Clemente’s deeds over the final week of his life proved just how big his heart was. But it should never be forgotten that he was a giver of the first rank his entire adult life. He gave and gave and gave…and the giving began way before his last night on this earth.

In the book REMEMBER ROBERTO, teammate Willie Stargell told author Jim O’Brien, “He was a giver. He wanted to help where there was help needed. And he was easy to approach. … He was very proud of where he came from, and felt that he was representing all Puerto Ricans. He often referred to his people in public forums. That’s why his people loved him so much.”

As a matter of fact, one of his principal philosophies on life was: "Any time you have the opportunity to accomplish something for someone and you don’t, you are wasting your time on this earth". On December 31, 1972, Clemente was aboard a plane - filled with medical aid, food and clothes – headed toward earthquake-stricken Nicaragua.

Eight days prior, an earthquake measuring 6.2 on the Richter scale struck Managua, Nicaragua, leaving a quarter-million residents homeless. Managua did indeed receive fast help. Other Latin American countries sent aid and United States President Richard Nixon ordered the Army and Air Force to organize relief efforts.

However, it was reported that Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle was stealing first aid supplies and selling them. This did not sit well with Clemente, who decided to do something about this injustice. He cut short his holiday celebrations and set up his own relief efforts.

While many were occupied unwrapping their gifts and preparing for their New Year’s Eve party, Clemente worked with a great purpose to help collect goods for the needy in Managua. “New Year’s Eve is one of the most sacred days in Puerto Rico, where everyone spends time with their families,” Stargell told O’Brien. “For him to do that, it was totally out of character in terms of the tradition of his country. But he said, ‘Hey, I’m very fortunate that I have my family, and I want to do something for people less fortunate.’ ”

On the last day of 1972, Clemente boarded a DC-7 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was packed with the supplies that he helped gather. His motto was, "Nobody is stealing anything from Roberto Clemente".

It took a special breed of a human being to go through with this. Upon seeing Pirate teammate Manny Sanguillen during this crisis, Clemente asked the young catcher if he wanted to go along and help out. The youngster, who idolized Clemente, agreed but never got to the airport in time.

Shortly after taking off at 9:20 p.m., the overloaded plane and its suspended pilot had some trouble controlling its 16,000 pounds of cargo, which reportedly shifted from one side to the other. A few seconds later, one of the engines caught fire as the DC-7 plunged into the Atlantic Ocean off the island’s coast.

Clemente’s 38-year-old body was never found.

His family and friends were shocked. Sanguillen, who had found a brother in the helpful Clemente, was in complete denial. He dove into the waters searching for the body, searching for his friend, searching for the stalwart who couldn’t possibly die. Sanguillen, who refused to end his search, had to be pulled away from the waters by his friends.

Clemente's teammates in Pittsburgh, who were enjoying the New Year’s Eve party at Stargell’s house, went from a loud and festive bunch to a silenced group of men relegated to an emotional ebb. Al Oliver, another teammate whom Clemente had touched and helped, couldn’t stop crying for three days.

In the book ROBERTO CLEMENTE THE GREAT ONE, Commissioner Bowie Kuhn told author Bruce Markusen, “Well, I remember being stunned by the news. I mean, it just seemed so impossible. Clemente was immortal. He wasn’t going to die in an airplane crash. I was shocked.”

Roberto’s youngest kid, who told his father not to go on the plane since he dreamt it would crash, lost a great role model. Puerto Rico was silenced. The city of Pittsburgh had lost a hero. Major League Baseball lost a warrior. The world lost a great humanitarian.

Clemente was so much more than a baseball player. While many athletes concerned themselves with rest and relaxation during the off-season, Clemente befriended civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to discuss issues relating to minorities in society as early as 1964. They would frequently meet at Clemente’s restaurant in Carolina, Puerto Rico.

“In the quarter century since Clemente passed away, no one has really stepped in to fill the moral void – the moral role – that he held when he played the game,” journalist Marcos Breton told Markusen.

During the eulogy, Kuhn said, “He gave the term 'complete' a new meaning. He made the word 'superstar' seem inadequate. He had about him the touch of royalty."

Two weeks after the tragedy, the Hall of Fame waived the customary five-year waiting period and elected Clemente. President of Baseball Writers Association of America Joe Heiling found no reason to wait for the obvious.

“He would have been elected and inducted in his first year eligible; so why wait?”

Twenty-seven years later, the pain is still hard to swallow. Reality is still difficult to come to grips with. Clemente still lives in the hearts of many and is an international hero for all. That’s why the highest sportsmanship and community activism award in baseball bears his name - the Roberto Clemente Award.

Kuhn, a rather stoic individual who would later be criticized for not attending Hank Aaron’s home run record-breaking game, seemed especially touched and moved by Clemente’s significance, and it came out in his address that August at the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies.

“So very great was he as a player. So very great was he a leader. So very great was he a humanitarian in the cause of his fellow men. So very great was he an inspiration to the young and to all of us in baseball and throughout the world of sports. And so very great was his devotion to young people everywhere and particularly to the young people of his native island of Puerto Rico. Having said all those words, they are very inadequate to describe the real greatness of Roberto Walker Clemente.”

As you're sharing a wonderful experience tonight with family and friends, think of what Clemente gave up and sacrificed.

***********************************************************************

Details of his special election to the Hall Of Fame....


Clemente First Latin Player Elected to the Hall of Fame
By Bruce Markusen

In the direct aftermath of the unexpected death of Roberto Clemente in a New Year's Eve plane crash, the Cleveland Plain Dealer became one of the first media outlets to champion the cause of a special Hall of Fame election for the deceased superstar. "It would mean breaking a rule or two," the newspaper's editor wrote in its January 2, 1973 edition, "but under the circumstances, the baseball writers might want to consider immediate enshrinement in the Hall of Fame."

Jack Lang, the secretary-treasurer of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) at the time, announced that his organization would explore the possibility of holding a special ballot. The president of the BBWAA, Joe Heiling, supported the idea. "He would have been elected and inducted in his first year eligible," said Heiling, comparing Clemente to first-ballot Hall of Famers like Sandy Koufax and Stan Musial. "So why wait?" Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, having been contacted by the Baseball Writers, added his support to the movement for a special election.

At the time, the writers were in the midst of holding their regular Hall of Fame election, and about 30 writers had already returned ballots with Clemente's name written in, even though no decision had been made on his eligibility. The write-in votes for Clemente indicated the growing support for his election by the writers.

Under the Hall of Fame's election rules at the time, players had to wait five years after the end of their playing careers before they could become eligible. Yet, Lang cited a precedent involving New York Yankees' great Lou Gehrig. In 1939, the writers had waived the traditional waiting period so that Gehrig, who was dying from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), could enter the Hall of Fame before his passing.

On January 3, the Hall of Fame's Board of Directors announced that it had amended its eligibility rules in the case of Clemente, and would allow the BBWAA to hold a special election. On March 20, 1973, 30 years ago this week, the BBWAA announced that Clemente had received 393 out of 424 votes on ballots cast-good for 93 percent of the vote-which put him well over the 75 percent required for election. Only six previous Hall of Famers had received a higher percentage of the vote at the time: Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Bob Feller, Ted Williams and Stan Musial.

Of the 31 "non-votes" in the Clemente election, about half of the writers attached explanatory notes stating they were not actually voting against Clemente, but against the decision to waive the five-year waiting period.

Six years after Clemente's election, the tragic death of Yankee star Thurman Munson once again raised awareness of the Hall of Fame's election rules. By then, the Hall of Fame had already altered its voting procedure for such tragic circumstances. In August 1973, the Hall instituted a new rule that allowed a deceased player to become eligible for the next regular election scheduled to occur at least six months after the player's date of death. Munson, who also died in a plane crash-on August 2, 1979-and coincidentally was Clemente's teammate with the San Juan Senators during the 1969-1970 winter league season, thus became eligible for the Hall's ballot for the first time in 1981.

On August 6, 1973, fans, baseball dignitaries and Pirate officials gathered in Cooperstown to witness the induction of Clemente into the game's shrine. Clemente's Pirate teammates also attended the ceremony. (As a tribute to Clemente, the Hall of Fame and the National League had agreed to substitute the Pirates for the Phillies in the annual Hall of Fame Game scheduled for later in the day.) Ironically, Clemente's induction coincided with that of Monte Irvin, his boyhood hero. Also inducted that day were Billy Evans, George Kelly, Warren Spahn and Mickey Welch. Standing at the podium in front of thousands of onlookers, Commissioner Bowie Kuhn read from Clemente's newly created Hall of Fame plaque:

"Roberto Walker Clemente, Pittsburgh National League 1955-1972. Member of the exclusive 3,000-hit club. He led the National League in batting four times. He had four seasons with 200 or more hits while posting a lifetime average of .317. He hit 240 home runs. He won the Most Valuable Player award in 1966. Rifle-armed defensive star set the National League mark by pacing outfielders in assists five years. He batted .362 in two World Series, hitting safely in all 14 games."

After paraphrasing the words that appeared on the plaque, Kuhn continued his address. "The directors of the Hall of Fame unanimously elected to waive the five-year waiting rule in the case of this very remarkable man. So very great was he as a player, so very great was he as a leader, so very great was he as a humanitarian in the cause of his fellow men, so very great was he as an inspiration to the young and to all of us in baseball and throughout the world of sports, and so very great was his devotion to young people everywhere and particularly to the young people of his native island of Puerto Rico. Having said all those words, they are very inadequate to describe the real greatness of Roberto Walker Clemente. We are very deeply honored to have his wife, Vera Clemente, with us here today."

The voice of Commissioner Kuhn, normally a stoic and reserved public speaker, wavered slightly throughout his address to those who had gathered in Cooper Park in front of the Hall of Fame's Library. "The ceremonies brought back the death and the poignancy of the death of Clemente-too soon and tragically. And I think that's what you were hearing. To me, we in baseball had simply lost one of the greatest players that we've had, one of the greatest personalities that we had, and the tragedy of it was still, I think, in my mind. It no doubt manifested itself in what I had to say and the way I said it. I'm quite clear that that would be an accurate description of how I felt," Kuhn said.

In her remarks during the ceremony, Vera Clemente said, "I want to thank the commissioner of baseball, the members of the Hall of Fame, the baseball writers, the Pittsburgh Pirates' organization and all the people who made this event possible, especially Roberto's fans who were the inspiration of his baseball career. This is a momentous last triumph, and if he were here, he would dedicate it to our people of Puerto Rico, our people in Pittsburgh, and to all his fans throughout the United States. Thank you."

With his election and induction now complete, Clemente became the first Latin American to gain enshrinement in the Hall of Fame. He would be joined in later years by Cuban Negro League star Martin Dihigo, Dominican pitcher Juan Marichal, Venezuelan shortstop Luis Aparicio, Panamanian infielder Rod Carew, Cuban slugger Tony Perez, and fellow Puerto Rican Orlando Cepeda. After the 1973 ceremony, Vera tried to offer a further reaction to her husband's history-making induction. "I have difficulty expressing the way I really feel," Vera told reporters. "It's not just for me and my children. It's a goal for all Latin American children, too."

Bruce Markusen is manager of program presentations at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum and is the author of Roberto Clemente: The Great One, published by Sports Publishing.










 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 08:18 PM
quote:
Thats pitchers and catchers right?

AND WHICH ONE ARE YOU??..

LOL! SORRY, It was a hanging curve, I had to hit it!



FOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUL BALL

"Jon, it looks like SkyPuupy needs to spend some more time in the cages. He's taking some awfully bad swings at these pitches and looking foolish while doing it."

"Yes Jon, he's also having a hard time hitting those quote button pitches. It seems like everytime one comes by he just doesn't know what to do with it and ends up swinging right over the ball."

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 09:34 PM
I heard Mike and the Maddog when they had a show on Clemente.

Amazing what he did on and off the field. Such a tragedy.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 09:40 PM
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I heard Mike and the Maddog when they had a show on Clemente.

Amazing what he did on and off the field. Such a tragedy.


I agree that it was a tragedy. Just wish they didn't change the rules because of it.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:02 PM
Can we please not bring that up again

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:11 PM
Ok Government throwing there weight around again! Saying if they don't get cooperation in probe they will step in. I wish they would just drop it

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2735234

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:20 PM
quote:
Ok Government throwing there weight around again! Saying if they don't get cooperation in probe they will step in. I wish they would just drop it

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2735234


I dont.

The owners need to fess up with what they know. This crap has been goin on too long.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:24 PM
I find myself agreeing with the whiskered Yankee fan on that one, Yankus Norvegicus over here.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2007 at 10:28 PM

Hi Pete

Looks like the Giants are back tracking on Barry's*** offer

Sweeet.. let him ROT.

 

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