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Author: Subject: Jerry Douglas Band To Open For Paul Simon On Summer Tour

Zen Peach





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  posted on 6/15/2006 at 08:38 PM
quote:
JERRY DOUGLAS BAND HITS THE ROAD WITH PAUL SIMON
06/15/2006


NASHVILLE, Tenn., June 15, 2006 - The Jerry Douglas Band has been confirmed for the opening position on the Paul Simon 2006 summer tour. Dates include the Montreal Jazz Festival, Doubleday Field in Cooperstown, NY and PNC Bank Arts Center.

Jerry Douglas, widely regarded as the world's best dobro player, was recently recognized again as Musician of the Year by the Country Music Association, his second such honor, adding to a long list of awards from the Academy of Country Music and the Country Music Association. He has also received 12 Grammy Awards, and an additional 5 NARAS acknowledgements for his work on the "Down from the Mountain" soundtrack. In 2004, the National Endowment for the Arts presented Jerry the 2004 National Heritage Fellowship, the highest honor for the Folk and Traditional Arts.

Although most widely known for his featured role with Alison Krauss and her band, Union Station, Jerry has earned the respect and collaborated with such artists as Norah Jones, Eric Clapton, Bela Fleck, Paul Simon, Ray Charles, John Fogerty, Dave Grisman, Trey Anastasio, James Taylor, Emmy Lou Harris, Derek Trucks and Earl Scruggs.


Douglas is represented by CAA and managed by D.J. McLachlan of McLachlan Management International. He is signed to KOCH Records out of New York.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/15/2006 at 09:02 PM
I'm thinking the Paul Simon crowd might not get into Jerry Douglas

 

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  posted on 6/15/2006 at 09:05 PM
quote:
I'm thinking the Paul Simon crowd might not get into Jerry Douglas


You never know. It sounds wonderful to me. The "Dylan crowd" certainly got into Merle Haggard on this recent tour

[Edited on 6/16/2006 by rlrichie]

 

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  posted on 6/15/2006 at 09:08 PM
This is great news for Jerry. This should really help get his name out to the many non-bluegrass fans who have no idea who he is. Hopefully some of the more openminded Simon fans will give his set a chance and maybe even come away "converted.

The Jerry Douglas Band is at or near the top of my "must see" list presently for bluegrass players. I'm fixin' to add a couple of more JD albums to my collection and thinking one of them will be his collaboration with Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, Bourbon And Rosewater. Do you have this one Derek, or anyone? ...if so, comments on that one please.

Larry O

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/15/2006 at 10:09 PM
quote:
I'm thinking the Paul Simon crowd might not get into Jerry Douglas



I think it will work. Simon's new album isn't the same old guitar strumming, but is full band eclectic and worldly in the Graceland vein. If the song "We Hide And Seek" doesn't get ya', your blood isn't flowing.

Besides, any Paul Simon fan worth their salt will remember that of the 1,500-plus albums that Douglas has played on, they includes some Paul Simon efforts ncluding the "Rhythm Of The Saints" album.

quote:
The Jerry Douglas Band is at or near the top of my "must see" list presently for bluegrass players. I'm fixin' to add a couple of more JD albums to my collection and thinking one of them will be his collaboration with Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, Bourbon And Rosewater. Do you have this one Derek, or anyone? ...if so, comments on that one please.

Larry O


"Bourbon and Rosewater' is awesome. It is along the lines of Derek's "Sahib Teri Mandi" only deeper. Jerry Douglas, with his 'Skip, Hop, and Wobbler Trio featuring Russ Barenburg on guitar and the incredible Edgar Meyer on bass, toured India as a part of a US government sponsored cultural tour. While over there Jerry sought out VM Bhatt, who invented the 19-string mohan veena guitar and has recorded with many Indian masters as well as folks like Ry Cooder, and they jammed and hit it off. After he came back to the US it was set up so that Douglas, Meyer and Bhatt could collaborate and the result is a fascinating mix of the two cultures and traditions.



quote:
The North Indian Bhatt stretches in a different direction for this collaboration with country/bluegrass dobro virtuoso Douglas and bassist Meyer, Douglas's frequent partner in Nashville. Both the dobro and the upright bass employ sliding tones, of course, and are quite compatible with Bhatt's mohan vina. All but one of the eight tunes on this all-instrumental album were written by one or more of the three musicians, and they come up with lovely, shimmering, legato lines. Instead of the earthy qualities elicited by Mahal's blues, Douglas and Meyer bring out the yearning and melodic qualities of Bhatt's playing with the result that this is Bhatt's most tuneful and accessible project yet. --Geoffrey Himes



As an odd side note, a lot of DVD players have that psychodelic artwork that is played on the TV screen when a audio-only CD is played in it. The swirling colors and shapes change with the sound of the music. For whatever reason, the "Bourbon and Rosewater" has na amazing affect on the shapes and colors the player produces. The best yet, that is if you are actually tweaked enough to stare at it.

Derek H

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/18/2006 at 07:22 PM
Jerry D. and Bela jam with Bonnie at Telluride;


quote:
Raitt, and then a Case study at Telluride

By John Lehndorff, Rocky Mountain News
June 16, 2006
TELLURIDE - Bonnie Raitt was the star headliner Thursday, the opening day of the 33rd Telluride Bluegrass Festival, but singer-songwriter Neko Case may be the voice lingering in memories long after the event is over.
The festival runs through Sunday at Town Park in this southwest Colorado mountain resort town.

The audience and performers experienced finger-numbing midday temperatures and a showery afternoon, punctuated by brief dust storms, blazing sun, a rainbow and a freezin' evening - another typical four-seasons-in-a-day experience.

Raitt had sung a few songs here a few years back, but this was the first time she'd done her own set. It was also the opening show of her summer tour, which meant the energy level was high, and the performance was far from rote.

Backed by a crack rock-blues band, Raitt earned cheers the moment she cut loose with that trademarked, unmistakable slide guitar - her second voice in addition to her own bluesy, raspy singing voice.

The emotional highlight of Raitt's set turned out to be her blues-meets- bluegrass encore of Thing Called Love with Bela Fleck and Jerry Douglas sitting in.

Neko Case went from Late Show with David Letterman in New York on Wednesday to her inaugural set Thursday evening with borrowed of equipment and instruments because of a bus breakdown.

The travel travail seemed to spark a powerhouse performance. She applied that majestic set of pipes to her own wonderfully quirky and quite poetic lyrics as well as Bob Dylan's Buckets of Rain and the chestnut Wayfaring Stranger.

This singular performance earns Case a place among the superior women songsmiths who have sent a chill up the collective spines of Telluride's hard-to-impress veteran audience, notably Sean Colvin and Mary Chapin Carpenter.

The festival commenced Thursday with the simple folk beauty of Tim and Mollie O'Brien, siblings seamlessly wrapping their voices around one another. They gave a nod to some of those who have passed since that first festival, including Charles Sawtelle (Hot Rize), Fred Shellman (original Telluride promoter) and John Hartford.

The drum-powered power jam music of Ryan Shupe and the Rubberband reminded everyone in attendance that this still is not a bluegrass festival, per se.

Boulder-raised Drew Emmitt, late of Leftover Salmon, called in a fiddling Sam Bush and singer John Cowan for bluegrass rock originals and a fine cover of Dylan's Meet Me in the Morning.

The components of the Telluride-born fusion "sound" were there in Tim O'Brien's voice, Bush's mandolin stylings, Jerry Douglas' genre- stretching dobro gymnastics, Bryan Sutton's blistering flatpicking, plus Edgar Meyer doing remarkable and sometimes hilarious things with his double bass.

Then there's Bela Fleck, boy wonder of the banjo, marking 25 consecutive years of festival performance.

This initial warm-up day pounded home the prevailing Telluride festival philosophy. It's not about stage dress, snappy between songs patter - it's all about extraordinary singing, picking and collaboration. Call it the ultimate anti-American Idol.

This critic and the crowd are looking forward to today's Telluride debuts of the Greencards, the Decemberists, the Drive-By Truckers and the return, after a year's absence, of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones.



 

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  posted on 7/21/2006 at 11:23 PM
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http://tinyurl.com/z6xtx

Dobro virtuoso Jerry Douglas doesn't mind being one of the worst-kept, best-kept secrets in the music business.

Insiders love him, but it's true that outside the music business the casual fan is more likely to know him best as a sideman and for his recording session credits.

But those 12 Grammy Awards and County Music Association's musician of the year kudos makes that low profile a little hard to maintain for someone who's taken the dobro far beyond its traditional lonesome howl.

“I just try to make a nice sound,” Douglas said from his Nashville home.

In truth, he's considered the king of the resonating 6-string instrument played with a hand-held polished metal bar. “It's like a violin and a guitar put together because you can move the note. You've got all this sustain,” Douglas explained. “It's just like a voice.”

Douglas opens for Paul Simon at Municipal Auditorium on Monday. It's his first major solo tour to promote “The Best Kept Secret” (Koch Records).

He has performed on some 1,500 albums. But this Nashville cat is best known as one of the featured musicians in Alison Krauss & the Union Station.


Headliner
Paul Simon can still surprise

“I was supposed to be off this summer but something happened,” he joked.
Instead, he's involved in the very musical paring with Simon, who's promoting the acclaimed new album with Brian Eno, “Surprise.”

Douglas is pumped to perform with the impossible-to-categorize Simon, who he said is really in the groove again. They’ll play “The Boxer” together most nights.

“It's amazing. To say I've been a fan is an understatement,” Douglas said. They met 13 years ago. Since then, Simon has been a regular audience member whenever Douglas hits the Big Apple.

He described Simon as meticulous, willing to rehearse his band every day to “revisit the big picture.” Simon always finds something new.

“He hears things in the show the night before that he wants, and he makes mental notes and he goes back and he goes through those things the next day in sound check,” Douglas said. “He's a musician first, that's the take I get on Paul. He's probably a writer first. But that goes along with being a musician.”

How does Douglas describe bluegrass music? It goes beyond simply being the white man's blues, as hillbilly music is often called, he said.

“It's blue collar music that's for sure,” he said. “With my music, the white collar elements have crept in — which would be the classical and the jazz version of things.”

And that's opened up things.

“That's what happened to my music. It started out as bluegrass music, which is poor man's music I suppose you could say, but over the years it's become everybody's music. My music is just all the influences I've had over the past 30 years.”

The attraction remains that it's honest music, he said.

His dobro style emotes a vocal quality. Douglas exploits the instrument's natural sustaining ring. “It's an emotional instrument,” he said. He also plays the lap steel guitar onstage.

Douglas did acknowledge that it's easy to be compartmentalized in the music business on Music Row.

“Bluegrass folks try to keep me in a box,” he said. “And I've never stayed there, and I never will.”

Former Creedence Clearwater Revival leader John Fogerty, 60, has had high praise for Douglas, 50, calling him his favorite musician. They are close friends.

Douglas credits it to the “Green River” album cover that showed the dobro. He knew then he wanted to play music with him.

Fogerty appears on the new album.

“We both have this love for the dobro, this instrument,” Douglas said. “It is a certain kind of person that gets involved with an instrument as strange as a dobro is. It's not something that everyone's got at home.”

Douglas said that he doesn't do many freelance studio sessions anymore because “I got really tired of what I was given to work with.”

He doesn't want to be predictable. “Country music went down another trail than I wanted to go,” he said. “I'm just trying to be an artist on my own.”

Douglas acknowledged that he's got as sweet gig — whether in or out of the spotlight.

“Yeah, I am sitting in a sweet spot because I can play all these different kinds of music, you know. And maybe confuse some people, but the people that I'm after have an open mind and listen to all kinds of music, and I'm just taking them from place to another.”


 

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  posted on 7/22/2006 at 03:13 AM
Saw Jerry Douglas open for Paul Simon last Sun. at PNC. He smoked, great band. They played a Derek-inspired Sahib Teri Bandi. Kicked Ass! Jerry signed a CD for me after the show. Asked him about Sahib and said I'm a big DTB fan. He said, "Me too!"
 
 


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