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Author: Subject: Incredible Derek Interview

Ultimate Peach





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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 09:53 AM
It's a bit lengthy, but definitely worth the read:
quote:

RM: I hear you played a Harley dealership the other day.

DT: It was a change of pace. It was nice. The people running it were really nice people, so it's fun.

RM: The last time I saw you you were at Strathmore concert hall in Bethesda. Then you played a Harley dealership, and tonight it's the 9:30 club. Does the venue affect how and what you play?

DT: When you play in a Harley dealership, you don't play the Indian classical tunes or the straight-ahead jazz tunes. You kind of, depending on what venue you're at, you definitely have the set head towards wherever you're playing. Strathmore you can play some more understated stuff and you can get quieter. Some of the big clubs, like 9:30, the rock clubs, it's hard to be too subtle because you seem to get bowled over by the audience. They take you out. Sometimes the audience noise can be louder than what's happening on stage if you get too quiet, which is one of the reasons why we try to alternate the tours a little. We'll do a theater run and then we'll do a large club run. That run we did, the Strathmore, it was all performing arts centers or small theaters, so you gear the set towards that.

RM: What direction do see your music going in? The band seems to be coming into its own, selling out theaters.

DT: One of the unique things about this group is I think we can do both. I think we can alternate venues that way. If you do the theater you attract a completely different crowd than when you play the 9:30. I think it's nice to be able to get though to different audiences that way. I hope we continue to do it that way, alternate the tours or even within a tour, alternate it. I think we can hit on both and keep them both legit.

RM: Is quiet and subtle new to you?

DT: It's always been a huge part of what the band, it's definitely the way the band thinks at times, but then you know it's also nice to just air it out on the other side of that, or when your playing a gospel tune just to let it fly. Even when we're playing the clubs you do it a little more aggressively or it's a little more over the top. It's nice to be able to get all of the sides out. It's one of the benefits of being able to play with the Allman Brothers and my group, there's all these different types of music, different emotions you can touch on that you don't get if you're doing one thing.

RM: The Allmans Beacon run is a real phenomenon in modern music

DT: This year especially it was amazing. They've been amazing to be able to ride that line. People consider them a Southern rock band. People consider them to be a jam band. People consider them a blues band. It's progressive; it's borderline fusion at times. It's a lot of things. And this Beacon run, they really reflected that in the guests that we had out. They had Roy Haynes sit in. Eighty-one years old, played with Charlie Parker, and now the Allman Brothers. Pretty amazing. And then Jimmy Cobb, the last surviving member from the Kind of Blue records. Then guys like Leslie West and Peter Frampton, and then you have Ravi Coltrane sitting in. We had Cornell Dupree, Jerry Jemmott, Bernard Purdie, the (King Curtis, Aretha Franklin) rhythm section that hadn't played together in 15 years and they came out and sat in and played Memphis Soul Stew. It was a pretty amazing experience.

They're able to cross all those lines, and I think this band is much in the same way but crossing different lines, with some of the world music. We're able to have a core audience that comes out to see blues, whatever they consider what the band does, and then you throw this other stuff, you put the medicine in it.

RM: You don't really consider it medicine?

DT: In a good way, I do. It's good to turn people on to things that they wouldn't naturally gravitate toward. There's a lot of amazing music out there and I think the wider your vision is that way, I think it extends to the rest of your life.

RM: What threads do you see between the blues music you play and the eastern songs?

DT: Some of the eastern music, the devotional music, I think it's maybe closer to the gospel music of the deep South, people like Mahalia Jackson or some of the great gospel music. The qawwali music, I think there's a common thread there. You have the vocal chorus backing up the group, usually hand claps are kind of driving it, and then somebody just belting on the top of it. It's all devotional music and you're getting that emotion across. Some of the other, maybe the Indian classical, maybe reminds me a little more of some of the Delta blues stuff and also some of the great jazz improvisation. But it's all human emotion. It's all with the same themes and the same threads.

RM: You've recorded "Maki Madni" twice, for Joyful Noise and Songlines, why is that?

DT: When we did it on Songlines we did another qawwali tune ("Sahib Teri Bandi") and we kind of threw "Maki Madni" in the middle of it for a second. It's just the way we started playing it live - the first recording we did, Joyful Noise, we had a qawwali singer on it. The version we did on the next record was just the band. I felt in some ways that this record, Songlines, was going to be a breaking out of the band. It's going to turn a lot of people on to the group that were completely unfamiliar with it, and I think having the qawwali tune is a big part of what the band does and we wanted to showcase it that way.

RM: What is the difference between being an Allmans sideman and leader of the Derek Trucks Band?

DT: With the Allman Brothers it's one of those organizations that kind of runs itself just on momentum. It just kind of goes. There are times when musically you take a leadership role and you're kind of responsible for pushing it in one direction or an other, but you don't have to really deal with the ins and outs of making it happen, the personalities, you don't have to deal with them in the same way. Whereas in this band you feel a little more responsible for everything that goes on. At the end of the day you're just trying to make it happen musically.

RM: Do you ever see yourself leaving the Allmans and just doing the Derek Trucks Band?

DT: Yeah I definitely see at some point just doing this. I don't know if it will be leaving the Allman Brothers or them winding down naturally. I think maybe something like the Beacon run will happen every year as long as those guys want to play. That's turned into something that I think it would be nice to keep that going. But the summer tours I could see getting smaller and smaller. I don't think they really have the desire to play all these sheds throughout the country forever.


RM: When your involvement with the Clapton tour began to leak out it was seen as seen as a Derek and the Dominos reunion, is that accurate?

DT: No, I think maybe we'll do a few tunes from that period and that record, but it's an Eric Clapton tour.

RM: So that won't be the theme?

DT: I mean I don't know for sure; we haven't started rehearsal yet. But there's no one in the band that was in Derek and the Dominos other than Eric at this point, so I can't imagine it being that. Maybe leaning more towards that period of his catalog but I'm not even sure of that.

RM: It's pretty well known you were named after the band. Is there any more to the story?

DT: I don't think so. It was a nice name. My parents loved the record.

RM: What was your parents', your dad's, involvement with the Allmans?

DT: They were around it, and my dad was a younger brother when they were doing their thing. So he was around the scene a little bit, but more as a fan and just kind of popping in you know -- made it to the Fillmore and a few of the great shows and always had amazing memories of that stuff , but he wasn't really around the scene all that much. So when I started playing it was, it felt weird to him because he knew the ups and downs of it, but he kind of knew it had to be done if musically it's supposed to happen. So when he first came on the road with me at a young age he kind of tried to shield me from things that he knew happened, he knew what went on.

RM: Can you walk that line now, through the pitfalls of rock-music life?

DT: It was really nice starting early, getting that early education, real-life education on the road. My dad was really good about making me aware even at a young age of what people were doing and what was going on, so I wasn't oblivious to it and then when you are free to do what you want you go all the way in the wrong direction. I knew what was going on and you saw the way it altered people's lives in a negative way and you choose to steer away from certain things.

RM: You mean drugs and other excesses?

DT: It's not just music, it's across the board, but it's real obvious and prevalent in musicians for some reason.

RM: You first played with the Allmans at age 11?

DT: They came out and sat in with a blues band I was playing with in Miami, that's when I first played with them.

RM: You played with Dylan in same year?

DT: Yep

RM: What was that like?

DT: With the Allman Brothers they were my first influence so for me that was pretty overwhelming and I really enjoyed that one. Dylan I obviously knew who he was, but it didn't have the same significance to me at the time - more so for my dad though, because he wrote his senior thesis on Bob Dylan so I think he was much more nervous when I was asked to sit in than I was.

RM: How old are you now?

DT: 26

RM: When's your birthday?

DT: June 8

RM: What's like to go from a young star to a mature performer?

DT: It's kind of wild because for the longest time, for over a decade you're always the youngest guy in the room, you're always the youngest musician in the room and now it's starting to shift. You're somewhere in the middle. I enjoy it more; having two kids changes they way you think about things too.

RM: Are they on the road with you?

DT: They're home now, but they're coming overseas with me for the Clapton rehearsals and the first month of shows, so we're looking forward to that.

RM: Is DTB playing gigs in Europe before joining Clapton?

DT: (At Wanee Festival in Live Oak, Fla.) We do a midnight show with my band. Then I drive to the airport and fly to France for rehearsals, so it starts immediately. We're doing two shows overseas with this band while Clapton has days off. One in London and one in Paris.

RM: What was it like recording with Clapton?

DT: It was great. That's what led to the tour. I got a call to play on his record that he was doing with J.J. Cale. Billy Preston was on it, so there were a lot of guys in the room that I was thrilled to be meeting and playing with. He was great; he was really down to Earth, talking about Clapton now. He was really easy to hang with. You felt like you've known him; he was just one of those guys, so it didn't feel awkward that way. Some guys in his position carry it on their, they wear it. It can be little difficult to relate to them immediately but he wasn't that way at all, so it felt really comfortable and then he offered me the tour. He was funny; he was like 'I know you've got a lot going on so take some time to think about it.' I said 'I don't have to roll that over in my head too many times.'"

RM: Did he say what he wanted you to contribute?

DT: Not really, he mentioned -- I think Doyle was in the room when he asked, and he mentioned it would be the three of us and he said how it was going to be exciting to have all that going on stage. So we'll see. I'm pretty sure he wants what you do, so…

RM: DTB now has "Key to the Highway," and "Anyday" in the repertoire.

DT: That ("Anyday") was a tune we just worked up for New Year's and it felt so good playing it we just stated putting it in the set. So maybe those are tunes we'll play with him. "Key to the Highway" was just a great blues tune to toss in. But in a way it was kind of a warm up, or at least to get those tunes back in my head or get 'em back in the front of your mind. That's the record that I listened to a ton early on, but then you know you get away from it.

RM: You don't sing. Do you make up for that by the way you play guitar?

DT: At times I try to play thinking as a singer. You're playing melodies and you're not thinking about guitar parts, you're thinking about cutting through on that level. But I just never really had the desire to sing; and being married to someone who can really sing, I don't want to be the hack in the house now.

RM: And you've got Mike Mattison.

DT: Yeah, he's got it covered.

RM: A reviewer of Songlines said you've outgrown the band; how do you react to that?

DT: It's a weird thing about reviews and critics. They can praise the record, but there's always going to be a little snide remark in there. I don't know if it's just part of the gig or what it is. But if I felt that way personally, I probably would have moved on. But I feel like there's a lot of music to be made with this group.

RM: You've been together a long time.

DT: Yeah, and I think it's a lost art. I don't think there's many bands that do stay together, and a lot of it is because people will believe what is read. There's a band, they've got something great doing on and somebody decides they're the sole reason for it, and they jump off and do their own thing and they all realize, 'wow this sucks. This is terrible.' I think you have to follow the path that got you there.

RM: The band is the right vehicle for you?

DT: There is something really honest about being with guys that you know well enough and that know you well enough where they're not just going to go with anything that is said. You're dealt with on a very honest level like you are with family. You can't get by with **** that you could if you had a new group all the time. You get called on your **** , and it goes across the board and I think it keeps everything really organic that way.

RM: It seems like family is a theme for your approach to music. There's the Allmans, your wife Susan (Tedeschi). Music is your big family.

DT: Oh yeah. I think it's important, especially if you want to do it throughout your life and you want to keep the music and everything really close to you. It's important to have people around that you actually give a damn about. It's weird because we've been around a lot of different groups and there's a lot of things working inside of different groups, and it's not always a healthy situation, so you try to set your situation up where it is and if there's an issue you deal with it immediately. If there's problems musically or otherwise you just discuss it you get it out and you don't wait for it to implode or explode

RM: Rolling Stone put you on its Top 100 guitarist list, others call you one of the best of your generation. But guitar heroes are no longer the pop-culture icons they were 30 years ago.

DT: Music has changed so much; that scene that was going on in the late 60s early 70s, it's the first time that musicians were viewed in that light. It lasted for a short period and then it was gone, and I think probably for the better. Not many that were held up in that status survived it. I don't think it's healthy for you. It was a weird thing going on then where guys like Hendrix and Clapton, a lot of them were held up in this light where they were almost deities ... Some of the guys dealt with it in the right way, some of the guys kind of got overtaken with it and some of the women too, and I don't think that's really going on in our scene any more.

It seems to have shifted away, in some ways in a negative way, where the music that's really being played and that musicians give a damn about is actually accepted, it's not that way any more. A band like this, 30-35 years ago would have had much more success than it does. It takes longer now. You just have to hit the pavement for 12 years before it starts coming back.

RM: Touring seems more important now.

DT: Oh yeah, we at one point were doing 250 days a year. You hit the road hard just to keep it rolling. That was before we got records out and everything else. You're just trying to build a grassroots following. And looking at it now, I can't think of a better way to do it because the fans that you do have are really loyal. And they care about the band and what's going on and they're going to support it in a real way. I think if you have overnight radio and TV success, I think it comes and goes pretty quickly.

RM: Where does studio recording fit in for you?

DT: I think it's nice to leave a document every few years of where the band is and what's going on. It's a different experience being in the studio. It's much more of a laboratory. You can throw out ideas that you can't really get across live. There's melodies. There's a thousand things that you do in the studio that you would never think about doing live. With this record, it's the first time I really felt like we explored the studio in a positive way. I've actually got the bug now. It makes me want to do it a lot more. I'm actually trying to build a studio behind my house so I can have an excuse to stay home, one, and then set up a laboratory and have all the great musicians that we know come down and contribute.

RM: Is there any studio work in the pipeline?

DT: No, this year is pretty solid. We're trying to get tunes together as a band so we can get back in, but between the Clapton tour and the Allman tour and us supporting this record it's pretty solid. We did do a DVD a few weeks back in Chicago and that will be coming out I think, July-August somewhere in there. We're really excited about that.
It was one of those where you have one shot at it. You know they're spending all this cash on 10 cameras, hi-def, and you've got to step up and either do it or not and luckily it was one of those nights were everyone played amazingly well. The vibe was right, the crowd was great, so we're excited about it. We had Jay Joyce who produced our record, he makes the DVD and it sounds great.

RM: Can you crank it up when you need to?

DT: You hope you can. That's one of the things being on the road for eight and 10 years as a band really does for you. Early on, I would notice in the high-pressure situations, sometimes it would just feel a little tight, like everyone was over-thinking it. It didn't feel natural. The last dozen or so chances we've had as a band to be in those situations where you really need to step it up everyone has, more than I expected that they would. Whether it's doing a show at Town Hall in New York, your really excited it's a beautiful venue and you know there's going to be people in the room listening. Where five years ago I think it might have been a little tense, it's the best show of the tour. And that's the way the Park West in Chicago was with DVD, I think it was the best show we played the whole tour. It's almost like you save it up for that night, and then the two shows afterward were not necessarily a let down but you feel like a little of the air has gone out because you've had this goal in mind the whole trip and you did it. The two shows after that, you still want to make it happen but it just doesn't have that same fire.

RM: How will it be to be playing with Doyle Bramhall II?

DT: I'm excited about it. The stuff he played on Susan's record I really enjoyed. Just the brief time I got to hang with him on the Clapton record was great, and I think he might be the reason I got the gig. He might have turned Eric on to our records, so I'm indebted to him that way. He's a great guy. I know we have a lot of common interests, musically and otherwise, so I imagine he'll be my partner in crime on the tour.

RM: Is a US tour on the cards?

DT: I don't know I've heard rumors about it, but nothing yet. I hope so.


RM: You play a surgical, meticulous style, how does that leave room for improvisation.

DT: I think it's just a matter of when you're onstage and focusing, you don't want to let any second go by where like you either half-assed it or phoned it in. You're hypercritical. You want to be able to listen back to a tape and not just be horrified by what I hear, and most of the time you are. So with the exception of maybe the record we just did, where the whole time you're in there you, know every note you play is going to be heard over and over. So you just focus in a different way and you don't air it out quite as much. There's some nights where you focus in a little harder than others. I wouldn't say focus; there are some nights where you are more meticulous and some nights where you feel freer. You just kind of get stupid with it -- let it fly a little more.

RM: How much are you focused on putting music out, how much do you take in when you play?

DT: It's a constant shift, man. It's a pulsating thing. There are some times where you're feeding off the audience; there are some times where you are completely self-absorbed or musically self-absorbed. There are sometimes where you are listening to the band and you don't really notice what you are playing. It seems to constantly shift. The peak moments you are kind of watching it all go down.

There are actually times where you can actually watch yourself and the band play, like you're almost stepping away from it. I remember the first time it happened it kind of freaked you out. And then you suddenly come back and there's a few wrong notes on the way back. On a great night you're a spectator too.

RM: You have cited Col. Bruce Hampton as a major influence; what's his place in American music?

DT: The colonel, he's a catalyst for so many ideas musically. Not only the colonel, but Jimmy Herring, Oteil. Jeff Sipe, all the guys that were in his circle musically. When I met them, maybe 12-13 years old, I was into the blues stuff, I was into the right stuff that way but outside of that I was pretty clueless to what else was going on, and they have such a broad view of things, and such an amazing take on things.

RM: Did you play with Aquarium Rescue Unit?

DT: We did shows with the Aquarium Rescue Unit. That's where I really got introduced to him. And the colonel was great -- always at the right time he would hit me with a certain book that would just blow my mind or a certain record. He turned me on to A Love Supreme and Sun Ra and just all these great records; it was right when I needed it. He seems to be a master of that. He takes musicians that have natural ability and just kind of shatters everything they thought about music and then you pick up the pieces and then you figure out that there's a whole new world out there. He also, somehow he makes you focus on making what you do important, but not take yourself very seriously. I think it's lost on a lot of musicians I think they have it backwards. You see a lot of guys, they take themselves real seriously and what they're doing doesn't hold that much weight with them."

RM: I got turned on to Sun Ra just a few years ago. It's exceptional music.

DT: There's so much of it, man, there's so many periods of it. There was a few years here that's about all I was into. There's so many great records and then John Gilmore his tenor player, man, he's on my list, top 3 or 4 tenors of all time. There's a few records with him. One is called Interstellar Low Ways. I think it's a track, Rocket Number Nine (Takes Off For The Planet Venus), it takes a tenor solo that's just beautiful. It starts really lyrical, really inside, it's beautiful and by the end of it it's just gone, to me its like the whole history of jazz tenor playing inside of one solo. It's amazing.
DT: There's some great footage of Sun Ra. I don't know if you've' seen it

RM: I've seen the Joyful Noise video - I connected it in my mind today with your Joyful Noise CD.

DT: There's some great Gilmore footage in that one. It's a great interview with Gilmore. They were asking him why -- he was a pretty big deal for a while - and everyone was like why are you staying with Sun Ra you have all these offers to go out and tour with McCoy Tyner, with Art Blakey? And he kinds of gives the story on that video (he said): "I all of a sudden heard it. We were playing this tune called Saturn and it hit me, I guess I'll make this my spot." Forty years later he was still doing it., man. It was not about the money or the glory for those guys, that's for sure.

RM: Is Sun Ra's collective ideal - they lived together - in any way a model for your band?

DT: I think so. Spending all that time just really being into him and his story and that music, think it's got to rub off on you in that way. Sun Ra was taken on a lot of levels. Some people took him seriously. Some considered it a total joke. Some people considered the musicianship horrible; some people thought it was genius. I think the way he and those guys would just let it roll off, and they kept doing their thing regardless of what was being said, I think it was a little bit of a model too.

RM: I first saw you with Phil Lesh in 1999.

DT: I didn't know any of that music until those days when I started playing with him. I got a random call from him on my cell phone, we were out on the road. Phil Lesh gave me a call. Our soundman was a Deadhead and I was like, "Is Phil Lesh, is he a bass player?" and he was like "oh yeah he's great." So I called him back and he asked me to come out and fill in for the guitar player that split (Steve Kimock) and I was like, "I'd love to but I don't know any of your music. I've never listened to any of the records," and he was like you know, "perfect, come on out." And every day they'd hand me a set list in the morning with three or four CDs and all the tunes burned on 'em and I'd just spend all day listening to these Garcia parts, and it was great experience to have to learn that stuff, be on the spot every night, tunes you learned that morning. It was a great experience, trial by fire.

RM: You weren't playing Garcia licks on that tour.

DT: I'd never heard 'em. If I would have (played them) it would have been by accident. I was just hanging out with Jimmy Herring last week, and he took that role when I left the band. The record that Phil heard that made him call me was the record that Jimmy Herring played on -- our record, the Derek Trucks Band, and he was asking about guitar players and I was like "Jimmy's the guy." So I played him a track on our record that had Jimmy and he was like "Oh yeah, you think he can do the gig?" and I was like "Oh yeah, he's got it covered." Jimmy was great in that role for a while.

RM: You've said you try to emulate the sound of horns.

DT: Yeah, you know, Wayne Shorter, and Gilmore and a lot of those guys. There were years where I just refused to listen to guitar players. It was all singers, horn players., Indian classical. Because there were so many, especially in the blues scene that I grew up around, there were so many guys that just emulated someone, and that was it - it was all Stevie Ray Vaughn licks, it was all - it became a thing to rebel against -- I'm just not going to listen to any of it anymore

RM: Where did you get your own musical voice and when did you feel it was your own?

DT: Somewhere in there, a few years after fumbling around with all that ****

RM: You just put the guitar influences off to the side?

DT: Yeah, for a little while, and then you come back to it and you realize how great that stuff really is, and you can incorporate a little bit.

RM: How were you affected by the theft of your gear?

DT: Blake our manager he was like sit down I've got bad news. So I was thinking it was health or somebody was hurt. He was like the gear was stolen and I was like oh, then a half-hour later I got pissed about it. But you know it can all be replaced. We were lucky, the response was pretty amazing. Two people showed up at the Beacon with 1964 Super Reverbs (amps) as gifts. But it doesn't sound the same, you know. I've had that amp for like 15 years, and I played it nonstop. It feels different. But it's coming around.

RM: Did you have stuff done to yours (amp)?

DT: Yeah, it was just weird speakers and **** in there you can't really replace.

RM: A lot of it was vintage, right?

DT: Oh yeah, the (Hammond) B-3 (organ) was from the 50s. The amp was from the 60s. Todd's bass head was early 70s. Rico had had his drum set for about 20 years. So it's a lot of stuff. An old (Hohner) Clavinet.

RM: Do you feel like they knew what they were looking for?

DT: That's my feeling, you know. Either that or it was completely random and somebody just thought they were getting lawn mowers in the trailer. They opened it up and were like "What the hell -- what am I going to do with this **** ?"

RM: I read you don't use effects pedals, and the amps are really important to your sound.

DT: This whole tour, it's been tweaking amps. The first few nights were frustrating. You're so used to the sound. You just can't get it. It's getting closer now.

From http://www.philzone.com/interviews/derek/index.html



[Edited on 5/5/2006 by vinsanity231597]

 

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"Derek Trucks's playing was stunning, like nothing I had ever heard before. He has clearly grown up listening to many different forms of music, and all of them come through in his expression. He seems to have no limit." - Clapton

 
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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 09:55 AM
I definitely find the parts about the Allmans winding down eventually and how he learned songs in the morning and played them at night incredibly interesting, just hope that the winding down of the Allmans isn't too soon

 

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"Derek Trucks's playing was stunning, like nothing I had ever heard before. He has clearly grown up listening to many different forms of music, and all of them come through in his expression. He seems to have no limit." - Clapton

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 09:57 AM
thanks vin..great read
 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 09:59 AM
Link to Reuters clip anyone. I had it saved but it won't function anymore.
Somebody please post .
Thanks.

 

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If we practice and eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, soon the whole world will be blind and toothless. -Mahatma Gandhi.

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:04 AM
Thank god for the Derek Trucks Band!
 

Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:14 AM
Thanx for posting that Vin, I'll choose to hope that 20 years from now, DtB will be the grizzled old vets and some version of the ABB will roll into the Beacon every March like a force of nature.

I thought the stuff about not listening to guitar players was really cool, it actually explains for me why Derek's playing sounds so un-cliched. Funny thing about him and Warren, it's ike the best of both worlds, and that struck me at the Beacon this yr over and over: Warren is like a walking juke box of great blues and rock guitar licks -- he knows 'em all, plays 'em with style and taste andwhen he's on, which is almost always, he transcends and pushes; whereas with Derek, it's like he refuses to play a cliche, he's constantly forging his own musical vocabulary. To have the satisfaction of the former and the thrill of the latter going on every night 5 feet apart from each other in the same stage is a rare f'in' treat!

 

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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:15 AM
Very nice read; thanks for that.
 

Extreme Peach



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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:17 AM
I think what he said about Bruce Hampton was very interesting - "He also, somehow he makes you focus on making what you do important, but not take yourself very seriously. I think it's lost on a lot of musicians I think they have it backwards. You see a lot of guys, they take themselves real seriously and what they're doing doesn't hold that much weight with them." SO very true among star musicians!

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:28 AM
quote:
RM: Do you ever see yourself leaving the Allmans and just doing the Derek Trucks Band?

DT: Yeah I definitely see at some point just doing this. I don't know if it will be leaving the Allman Brothers or them winding down naturally. I think maybe something like the Beacon run will happen every year as long as those guys want to play. That's turned into something that I think it would be nice to keep that going. But the summer tours I could see getting smaller and smaller. I don't think they really have the desire to play all these sheds throughout the country forever.



I don't think there are too many of us that are really all that surprised by this statement Derek made. Obviously with the original members all around 60 years old, there will certainly be a "gradual" winding down of The ABB tour schedule for the next couple of years. All of the elder staestman in music are touring less - Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Dickey, etc etc are all cutting back on touring somewhat - at least compared to what they are used to. AS Derek said, The Beacon run is something they can do for a few more years but the shed thing in the summer may be a bit too much after a while. IMO this is ALL gravy as far as the ABB goes anyway...who knew back in 2000 we'd even get 6 more quality years of music with them hitting new peaks year after year after year....and besides The Beacon, We also have DTB and The Mule for many years to come...yay!



[Edited on 5/5/2006 by EddieP]

 
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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:45 AM
This was a great read. I thought the interviewer did a great job of asking the right questions to really bring out Derek's thoughts.

Couldn't help but think how great it would be for someone to interview Duane right now, get his thoughts of what has transpired in his band's world in the last 36 years, his thoughts on Derek joining up with EC.

 
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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:36 AM
Great article Vin, thanks for posting it. Where does it come from?

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:41 AM
From the philzone - speaking of Phil, I tried to get tickets today for PNC, nearly impossible, I got in at most 15 seconds after on sale, and came up with section 304, which is crappy, I then searched again and it said none were available - wow

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:43 AM
quote:
But I just never really had the desire to sing; and being married to someone who can really sing, I don't want to be the hack in the house now.



haha too true...

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:52 AM
Thanks for posting this, Vin. Probably the most thorough Derek interview I've read.

As an aside I happened to run into the band at dinner before a recent West coast show. I kidded them about not letting Eric steal Derek away. Derek seemed to take it seriously and reassuring stated, "Ah, don't worry about that." To me it indicated that he did not want his allegiance to the dTb doubted in any way.

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:54 AM
quote:
From the philzone - speaking of Phil, I tried to get tickets today for PNC, nearly impossible, I got in at most 15 seconds after on sale, and came up with section 304, which is crappy, I then searched again and it said none were available - wow


What a weird way to do ticketing, I couldn't find it after searching for a really long time, and then I pull Section 101 Row P Seats 14-16 - anyone who's sat around here before have any idea what these are like? They looked pretty awesome.

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 01:42 PM
"sect 101, row P"
Good seats!

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 02:14 PM
that was great, thanks a lot
 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 04:21 PM
Great interview, thanks for posting.
 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 05:06 PM
Did I read correctly that a video of Joyful Noise has/will be made?
 
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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 05:14 PM
Great Interview,

Derek is a sage young man and he has the right spirit to play music for a long time.

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 10:46 PM
Great interview. I like this part:

"There are actually times where you can actually watch yourself and the band play, like you're almost stepping away from it. I remember the first time it happened it kind of freaked you out. And then you suddenly come back and there's a few wrong notes on the way back. On a great night you're a spectator too."

I TOLD y'all he's an alien!

 

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  posted on 5/5/2006 at 11:05 PM
quote:
Great interview. I like this part:

"There are actually times where you can actually watch yourself and the band play, like you're almost stepping away from it. I remember the first time it happened it kind of freaked you out. And then you suddenly come back and there's a few wrong notes on the way back. On a great night you're a spectator too."

I TOLD y'all he's an alien!




Here is the rest of the story. That interview took place on April 8. About a week earlier I interviewed Derek and this subject of 'watching yourself play' came up in an interesting way. I asked many other musicians that Derek has played with to give to me questions for him that they wanted answered. Jerry Douglas, on whose latest album Derek plays on, came up with the 'watch yourself play" question. Read how it came about, and Derek's answer to it, here,(we just now got it up)

www.gritz.net.

Derek H

 

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  posted on 5/6/2006 at 11:28 AM
THANKS VERY MUCH FOR POSTING THE DEREK INTERVIEW! I'M BUMPING TO PAGE ONE.
 
 


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