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Author: Subject: On a scale of 1-10, how influential was George Martin....

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 07:30 PM
on the Beatles?

1 being George Martin was inconsequential,
10 being we wouldn't have had The Beatles as we knew them without George Martin.

 

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 07:40 PM
quote:
on the Beatles?

1 being George Martin was inconsequential,
10 being we wouldn't have had The Beatles as we knew them without George Martin.

10......Just as John and Paul were great song writers......George Martin had the equal abilities to bring out what they wrote and display it like no one else would have been able to.....He was the 5th Beatle IMHO

 

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 08:22 PM
I think he deserves an 8+, at least.

George Martin has written a couple of books (that I am aware of). One is simply titled "the Making of Sergent Pepper" and the other is "All You Need is Ears". I have not read the latter.

I've read "the Making of ..." and many articles about Martin. To me, one of the George Martin signatures is the use of brass instruments in songs like "All You Need is Love" and "Penny Lane". McCartney had heard some Bach trumpets on a television show one night and told Martin that he would like to have that sound in one of his songs. Martin arranged an ensemble of Bach trumpets for "Penny Lane". He had a great deal to do with the overall sound of "Sergent Pepper" as well.

In "the Making of ..." he laments that back then non-linear, digital recording was unheard of. It would be pretty simple to duplicate what they did back then with cheap recording packages that are available for computers nowadays. But they had to be creative. For the "never ending final note" they ran microphones into every studio room that had a piano. They had to count-down to sync up so that everybody hit the note at the same time. A pretty simple trick, really, but he had the idea to do it.

Another trivial matter: The name for that electronic guitar adjunct known as a "Flanger" came about when a meddling John Lennon (trying to involve himselve with technical aspects of the recording process) kept asking questions about something that Martin was doing, he replied that he was "adjusting the flanger". I guess if you can't baffle them with brilliance ...

 

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 08:44 PM
A 10 without a doubt. Just listen to all those Beatles Demos that float around. First he had a huge part to arranging the songs with the band. Then he added all the other instruments, sounds effects and scored the arrangments for strings, horns and orchestra. He was a classical producer which accounts for a huge element of the Beatles sound. Plus he brought out the best in the band. Easily the 5th Beatle.

Just listen to any of their solo releases after the breakup to hear what is missing.

Martin sure didn't hurt Jeff Beck either. Some of his best is with Martin producing also.

 

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 09:27 PM
Absolutely a ten. The Beatles could never have developed their studio sound without him. It was Martin that suggested a slow ballad named "Please Please Me" might do better as an up tempo rocker. He had everything to do with the great quality of the 65-67 albums (Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper)

Doug

 

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  posted on 7/21/2005 at 11:47 PM
From the string quartet arrangment in "Yesterday," to the brilliant tape compilation at the end of "Being For the Benefit of Mr. Kite," to the piano doubling the guitar in the solo of "A Hard Day's Night," to the inate ability to totally understand the acid-drenched minds of the boys, as he called them, during the Sgt. Pepper album, to all of the subtle nuances he added from beginning to end of their recording career, I would give him a 3 maybe... oh, I meant a 30! Oh yeah, and he loved Peter Sellers, too. Thank God for people like George Martin and Tom Dowd, who were wise enough to let the music and the artists do the talking.
Willie Howard (from Mayberryetta, a suburb of Hot'lanta)

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 12:25 AM
He didn't die did he?

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 07:16 AM
Good question.
I should know the answer to these things.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 08:39 AM
Without a doubt the 5th Beatle gets a 10. A geniius and a true genleman.
 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 09:26 AM
Since the Beatles were/still are one of the most important musical acts of the 20 century and shold be considered architects for current popular music, I guess the guy who swept the floor at Abbey Roads could be thought of as the best floor sweeper by association alone. George Martin was the fifth Beatle, a hair less important than John and Paul, but a ten without question.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:20 PM
quote:
on the Beatles?

1 being George Martin was inconsequential,
10 being we wouldn't have had The Beatles as we knew them without George Martin.
John Lennon was right, "Instant Karma's gonna get you"..........this is what I get for posting in a DICKEY thread I am closely associated with friends, producers, musicians, both past and present to the fab four so I will answer not by opinion, but by weighing it all out. This is an intense question. My answer to follow, but first..............

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:23 PM
quote:
quote:
on the Beatles?

1 being George Martin was inconsequential,
10 being we wouldn't have had The Beatles as we knew them without George Martin.

10......Just as John and Paul were great song writers......George Martin had the equal abilities to bring out what they wrote and display it like no one else would have been able to.....He was the 5th Beatle IMHO
Yes he is known as the 5th Beatle and rightfully so. But on "Let it Be', Billy Preston was credited as the 5th Beatle as well, playing on the album. Nobody realised till later that Clapton played guitar on "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", Harrison's song and idea.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:25 PM
quote:
I think he deserves an 8+, at least.

George Martin has written a couple of books (that I am aware of). One is simply titled "the Making of Sergent Pepper" and the other is "All You Need is Ears". I have not read the latter.

I've read "the Making of ..." and many articles about Martin. To me, one of the George Martin signatures is the use of brass instruments in songs like "All You Need is Love" and "Penny Lane". McCartney had heard some Bach trumpets on a television show one night and told Martin that he would like to have that sound in one of his songs. Martin arranged an ensemble of Bach trumpets for "Penny Lane". He had a great deal to do with the overall sound of "Sergent Pepper" as well.

In "the Making of ..." he laments that back then non-linear, digital recording was unheard of. It would be pretty simple to duplicate what they did back then with cheap recording packages that are available for computers nowadays. But they had to be creative. For the "never ending final note" they ran microphones into every studio room that had a piano. They had to count-down to sync up so that everybody hit the note at the same time. A pretty simple trick, really, but he had the idea to do it.

Another trivial matter: The name for that electronic guitar adjunct known as a "Flanger" came about when a meddling John Lennon (trying to involve himselve with technical aspects of the recording process) kept asking questions about something that Martin was doing, he replied that he was "adjusting the flanger". I guess if you can't baffle them with brilliance ...
Good post, and when George met Paul at school, Paul had a trumpet.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:26 PM
quote:
A 10 without a doubt. Just listen to all those Beatles Demos that float around. First he had a huge part to arranging the songs with the band. Then he added all the other instruments, sounds effects and scored the arrangments for strings, horns and orchestra. He was a classical producer which accounts for a huge element of the Beatles sound. Plus he brought out the best in the band. Easily the 5th Beatle.

Just listen to any of their solo releases after the breakup to hear what is missing.

Martin sure didn't hurt Jeff Beck either. Some of his best is with Martin producing also.
5th beatle Yes, but they also brought out the best in him, they drew from each other.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:28 PM
quote:
Absolutely a ten. The Beatles could never have developed their studio sound without him. It was Martin that suggested a slow ballad named "Please Please Me" might do better as an up tempo rocker. He had everything to do with the great quality of the 65-67 albums (Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper)

Doug
Let's just say, they were a custom automobile that George Martin fine tuned and Brian Epstein was the auto salesman!

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:32 PM
quote:
From the string quartet arrangment in "Yesterday," to the brilliant tape compilation at the end of "Being For the Benefit of Mr. Kite," to the piano doubling the guitar in the solo of "A Hard Day's Night," to the inate ability to totally understand the acid-drenched minds of the boys, as he called them, during the Sgt. Pepper album, to all of the subtle nuances he added from beginning to end of their recording career, I would give him a 3 maybe... oh, I meant a 30! Oh yeah, and he loved Peter Sellers, too. Thank God for people like George Martin and Tom Dowd, who were wise enough to let the music and the artists do the talking.
Willie Howard (from Mayberryetta, a suburb of Hot'lanta)
Paul wrote "Yesterday"when he was 20. Brian introduced them to Martin in 1962. They had already done Hamburg, and England and made a musical reputation for themselves. Martin wanted to do what they had accomplished if you read his story. I think he lived vicariously through them.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:34 PM
quote:
He didn't die did he?
Heavens No, you will HEAR about that. But he has been Knighted and I believe only due to his musical contributions with The Beatles. They drew from each other.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:35 PM
quote:
Good question.
I should know the answer to these things.
You would know it if you followed them since you were 10 yrs old. You could probably answer more Allman Brother questions than I.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:36 PM
quote:
Without a doubt the 5th Beatle gets a 10. A geniius and a true genleman.
I'll go with the genius and true gentlemen part.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:41 PM
quote:
Since the Beatles were/still are one of the most important musical acts of the 20 century and shold be considered architects for current popular music, I guess the guy who swept the floor at Abbey Roads could be thought of as the best floor sweeper by association alone. George Martin was the fifth Beatle, a hair less important than John and Paul, but a ten without question.
Great statement about the floor sweeper. A lot of people don't know that Alan Parsons of "The Alan Parsons Project" and solo stuff, was a hired hand at Abbey Road Studios and fetched coffee for everyone! But he payed attention and became a great musician. Recently an "Unused roll of toilet paper" from The Abbey Road recording days turned up at an auction! lol, I have a lot of things around my house The Beatles never used!

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:51 PM
My answer if you care is this, since I just returned from a Beatles convention in Nashville where those pickers played their music unbelievably! Yes, Nashville! I spent a lot of time with panel experts one being Louise Harrison a friend of mine. (George's sister) George Martin was the 5th Beatle by nature. They found and needed each other for the magnitude of success and what they accomplished. He was knighted thanks to them being "in his life". The experts will say YES they would not have been what they became, but to give George Martin a 10 is inaccurate. I will say a 5, as to say they all gave 50/50. And thank God I was born in this era. But years down the road their music will live on like Classical music today. Credited, song writers Beatles, Produced by Sir George Martin. Or it may just purely read Lennon/McCartney, or, Harrison.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 03:52 PM
And in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 06:51 PM
10. Definitely, not to take away from from the four of them though. I think those four guys with George Martin was definitely a magical mixture of personalities and talents that would not be quite the same if there was a missing element or a changed element.
 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 07:25 PM
quote:
quote:
A 10 without a doubt. Just listen to all those Beatles Demos that float around. First he had a huge part to arranging the songs with the band. Then he added all the other instruments, sounds effects and scored the arrangments for strings, horns and orchestra. He was a classical producer which accounts for a huge element of the Beatles sound. Plus he brought out the best in the band. Easily the 5th Beatle.

Just listen to any of their solo releases after the breakup to hear what is missing.

Martin sure didn't hurt Jeff Beck either. Some of his best is with Martin producing also.
5th beatle Yes, but they also brought out the best in him, they drew from each other.


Without a doubt! It always helps two have guys like that to work with.

By the way, do you like The Beatles? I still think Paul charges too much.

I have had the Magical Mystery Tour Demos playing in the car for the last two days. Amazing to hear what George Martin creates over a primitive base at times. Listening to Ringo try and figure out what the hell is going on in some tunes is funny. They must be telling him to imagine some of the stuff that would come later. Pretty hard to do with some songs. Day In The Life and I am The Walrus are pretty wild to hear just the band. Awesome stuff but it really let's you see what Martin brought to the mix.

Imagine a perfect world where they kept working together. They would have been able to in today's music scene because bands release albums two-three years apart. They could have done one every five. The pressure to release two albums a year and tour just did them in. Too much attention. But it isn't like it ever went away. They have always been in the spot light. They should have stayed together. Too bad.

 

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  posted on 7/22/2005 at 08:03 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
A 10 without a doubt. Just listen to all those Beatles Demos that float around. First he had a huge part to arranging the songs with the band. Then he added all the other instruments, sounds effects and scored the arrangments for strings, horns and orchestra. He was a classical producer which accounts for a huge element of the Beatles sound. Plus he brought out the best in the band. Easily the 5th Beatle.

Just listen to any of their solo releases after the breakup to hear what is missing.

Martin sure didn't hurt Jeff Beck either. Some of his best is with Martin producing also.
5th beatle Yes, but they also brought out the best in him, they drew from each other.


Without a doubt! It always helps two have guys like that to work with.

By the way, do you like The Beatles? I still think Paul charges too much.

I have had the Magical Mystery Tour Demos playing in the car for the last two days. Amazing to hear what George Martin creates over a primitive base at times. Listening to Ringo try and figure out what the hell is going on in some tunes is funny. They must be telling him to imagine some of the stuff that would come later. Pretty hard to do with some songs. Day In The Life and I am The Walrus are pretty wild to hear just the band. Awesome stuff but it really let's you see what Martin brought to the mix.

Imagine a perfect world where they kept working together. They would have been able to in today's music scene because bands release albums two-three years apart. They could have done one every five. The pressure to release two albums a year and tour just did them in. Too much attention. But it isn't like it ever went away. They have always been in the spot light. They should have stayed together. Too bad.
But a 10 to me means 100%. Why not give pot, uppers, downers, heroin, and LSD credit for their expanded creativity. Would Sgt. Pepper have been created without LSD or cocaine to keep them going for 7 months to work on it? Post beatles solo albums did very well without Sir George and "All Things Must Pass" is credited as a perfect album and George being the most successful Beatle because of it. Sir George had nothing to do with his "India Culture" influence. GH got into it on the set of the movie "Help" hearing sitars. I listen to the Anthology discs of their "practice" before Martin or Spector got involved and I think the practice material was great! But I know what you mean. He made everything perfect. Yes I like The Beatles, Yes Paul's shows are expensive but I can't change that. So, I let it be.

 

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