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Author: Subject: A Duane guitar????????

Peach Head





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  posted on 6/20/2005 at 04:20 PM
On Saturday, I went to the Hard Rock Casino in Tampa. In the lobby, there is a Strat that is supposed to have belonged to Duane. It said he played in on the Ronnie Hawkins' LP and used a tube from an amp since he left his slide at home. He was then supposed to have given the guitar to Ronnie Hawkins. I have never seen this guitar, and I've never heard this story. Does anyone know if this is correct? I doubt a guy playing sessions would give a guitar away like that.
 
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Peach Pro



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  posted on 6/20/2005 at 04:53 PM
Duane did play Strats at one time...

 

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  posted on 6/21/2005 at 06:27 PM
Duane played strats alot during his session work, and there are a couple of shots floating around somewhere...

 

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  posted on 6/21/2005 at 11:18 PM
It's said that Duane played a Strat on the studio version of Don't Keep Me Wonderin'
 

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  posted on 6/21/2005 at 11:52 PM
I can believe Duane gave away a guitar,
if the notion struck him. He was a very generous
and giving man!

 

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  posted on 6/23/2005 at 06:36 AM
I think that is a blue 54 Strat, right? I don't know the story infull, but that was definitley Duanes guitar...

 

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  posted on 6/23/2005 at 05:59 PM
quote:
He was a very generous
and giving man!



That he was.

 

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  posted on 7/3/2005 at 10:44 PM
Well how about this one....

 

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  posted on 7/4/2005 at 01:05 AM
Duane was a one-of-a-kind-guy!
God Bless Him !

 

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  posted on 7/4/2005 at 06:33 PM
Yeah Duane Definetly used a strat for some of his recording session. The sound is so diffrent.

 

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  posted on 7/4/2005 at 07:04 PM
I didn't ever see him playing maple neck stratocaster in any pics!
I'd like to see another pics if exist.

 

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  posted on 7/5/2005 at 07:35 AM
The name on the plate next to the guitar (with Duane's) is Wayne Perkins. Wayne is from here in Birmingham, AL. He was a session guitarist in Muscle Shoals immediately after Duane left. Their times there may have even overlapped briefly.

Wayne played on albums by Bob Marley, Joini Mitchell, Hank Williams Jr., Leon Russell, Lonnie Mack, Lynyrd Skynyrd (including some of their earliest demo stuff) and too many other bands and acts to list.

Wayne was unofficially announced by the Rolling Stones management as their new guitarist after Mick Taylor left. When Ron Wood announced his availability, the Stones decided to go with him, keeping the band British. That was really a shame for them, because Wayne Perkins is (at least) twice the guitarist that Ron Wood is. I've read (in one of the Roling Stones "coffee table" books) where Keith Richard has said not only was Perkins better than Wood, but also probably better than Mick Taylor. In my humblest of opinions, the exit of Mick Taylor marked the beginning of the decline of the Rolling Stones.

Wayne also declined an invitation to join Skynyrd on a permanent basis just before the plane crash.

[Edited on 7/5/2005 by Rusty]

 

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  posted on 7/5/2005 at 07:39 AM
Also, I can't tell from the exposure if this Stratocaster is black or sunburst (hey!, the eyes are the first thing to go!). I know that Wayne has (or had) a black Strat given to him by Eric Clapton. I doubt that that's the guitar in the picture ... but it's a good story.

 

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  posted on 7/6/2005 at 12:02 PM
Lespaul71 PM'd me with the link for the Strat in the picture above (thanks, LP71).

http://www.lynyrdskynyrdtrybute.it/lstband.htm

It seems that the picture is from a Spanish Lynyrd Skynyrd Tribute page. The fact that the trophy plate bears the names of both Duane Allman and Wayne Perkins caught my attention. Perkins does have some association with Lynyrd Skynyrd. But why is
Duane's name on the plate? My Espanol is somewhat lacking. Anybody out there (Carlos?) able to transcribe from the site ... maybe tell us why two names are on the guitar?

 

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  posted on 7/9/2005 at 11:13 AM
Well, I can't answer your question about that particular Strat, but I love those sessions, and it would be nice to think that Duane used that particular guitar on those Ronnie Hawkins recordings, that I love so much. All that Strat talk got me thinking, however, and here's a Duane story that you might enjoy...

Duane had a real Fender fetish in the early days. Probably his all-time favorite guitar from his early Allman Joys/Hourglass days was a Telecaster body with a Strat neck. He lost that guitar when it was stolen while the Hourglass was touring the mid east in late 67 or early 68.

About the same time that Duane lost his Tele/Strat hybrid, the guitar player in my band acquired a blond neck Strat that he rebuilt out of "junk" pawnshop parts. If I remember correctly, his "new" guitar was in several pieces, and purchased in a box for under $100. He had the body painted sort of a Robin Egg Blue by the local facto-bake car painting company. When he finished sanding, lacquering, rewiring, and otherwise putting it back together, he was delighted to discover that his Strat sounded great. It was a wonderfully punchy guitar, and Duane lusted after that guitar from the first time he laid eyes on it like a stray dog after a T-bone. Duane would come into the club that we played in, and ask to sit in (I'm sure) just to get his hands on that guitar. He begged and even tried to trade a Les Paul for my buddies guitar. No deal. We had all put too much time and elbow grease into the Robin Egg Strat to let it go...even to Duane.

One night when Duane was using my buddies guitar, and he was lost in one of his searing trademark "where the hell are we going next" eyes-closed, solo's, Duane forgot that he had tucked a lit cigarette under the strings near the first tuner when he started the song. By the time that Duane finished his solo, and rejoined the rest of us on stage, the cigarette had burned out, and also burned the headstock on my friends guitar. Duane was horrified that he had blemished the cherished guitar, and apologized over and over, but in reality, what he had actually done was sanctified the guitar for all time. Even at seventeen and eighteen, we all knew Duane was destine to be someone special, and my buddy looked at the burn mark as Duane's signature.

I have cherished pictures of my buddy playing the "Duane Strat," as it was called after that night. There are even recordings of our band, and the Hourglass with Duane playing that guitar. Duane always tried to visit that guitar when he was in town, and it did sound wonderful. Duane's burn marks were never removed...actually, they were lacquered, and forever enshrined.

The Allman Brothers Band was still in its infancy when my buddy traded that guitar to his brother for a semi-hollow body. His brother needed a Strat for the road, and my friend was in college and didn't need the solid body as much anymore. Sadly, the "Duane Strat" went the way of many great-sounding guitars that wind-up getting used on the road; it was stolen after a show, somewhere in New Jersey. I can only hope that the bastard that stole that particular guitar at least played well, and recognized how wonderfully powerful it sounded. I'm sure that the perpetrator had no clue of the history of that guitar. The "Duane Strat."

Bill

 

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  posted on 7/9/2005 at 11:29 AM
Thanks for another awesome story, Bill!
quote:
He lost that guitar when it was stolen while the Hourglass was touring the mid east in late 67 or early 68.
Idiot terrorists!

 

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  posted on 7/9/2005 at 04:50 PM
Would you mind sharing those pics and audio you mentioned?

the strat in the picture is dark sunburst, as it looks to me.
How come Duane switched to the Les Paul after obviously having quite a love for Fenders? Maybe it was the Robin's Egg Strat, if he couldn't have one that sounded like that, he wouldn't have any. Or perhaps he just hadn't discovered Gibsons except for a Les Paul Jr.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2005 at 09:30 PM
quote:
He lost that guitar when it was stolen while the Hourglass was touring the mid east in late 67 or early 68.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----

Idiot terrorists!


Darn it, they ruin everything...

 

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  posted on 7/9/2005 at 09:42 PM
Bill, I do truly enjoy reading your posts everytime. I can't thank you enough for sharing it all!!


I've come across a interesting little article about Stratocasters. It doesnt mention Duane, but since we appeared to be on the subject of the guitar....Enjoy!

Stratocaster reshaped music
Little did Leo Fender realize that his guitar would reshape the landscape of modern music
By JIM PRICE

Posted: July 19, 2004

It comes in more hot colors than a Corvette - shades like Lake Placid Blue, Surf Green and Candy Apple Red.

Its sculpted shape has become so familiar that it's what most people picture in their minds as "the electric guitar."

And most important, it is the electric guitar sound heard on more recordings and in more live performances than any other, from grizzled veterans such as Eric Clapton - who's performing tonight at the Bradley Center - to the freshest teen sensations.

It is the Fender Stratocaster, it is a half-century old this year and it's looking pretty darn good for 50.

Fender Musical Instruments Corp. will not divulge the exact number of Stratocasters it has produced since its introduction in 1954, but it is safe to say it is well over the 1 million mark and counting faster than ever.

"It is the bestselling guitar in the world," said Fender representative Morgan Ringwald. "It outsells any other instrument 10 to 1."

The Strat, as many players and fans call it, was not the first electric guitar, or even the first solid-bodied electric guitar.

Clarence "Leo" Fender had already been producing the Telecaster guitar for several years and it incorporated the fundamental design his instruments would be known for: a slender maple neck with an unusual one-sided headstock, screwed to a solid ash or alder body with one or more single-coil magnetic pickups - a rather crude magnetic microphone that picks up the string's vibrations.

The story goes that Leo Fender intended to market his first guitars to jazz players - and they hated them. They preferred the round, mellow tones of their fat, hollow-bodied Gibson models, and this new guitar had a bright "twangy" sound.

So Fender turned to country and Western swing players who, although skeptical at first, soon began to mold the Telecaster twang into the sound of country as we know it.

"It may be apocryphal," Ringwald said, "but supposedly Bill Carson, a legendary swing player who is still with us today, complained that the Telecaster body was too 'chunky'; it dug into his ribs."

Fender responded as though a light had gone on.

He apparently realized that what he was toying with was not just a guitar with electronic pickups attached but a whole new instrument, capable of producing unheard-of sounds and of being used in entirely new ways.

The Stratocaster had a swooping, contoured body that hardly resembled the classic Spanish guitar.

It was scooped away in the back to rest comfortably against the player's body. It had three pickups instead of the usual one or two. It also had a "floating bridge" that Fender hoped would help keep the instrument in tune and reduce string wear when performers used the tremolo arm on the guitar for chord-bending effects.

"It really is perfection," said Greg Koch, the Milwaukee guitar maven who has become one of Fender's top instrument demonstrators. "If it was an accident, it was an accident by a genius - a really clever guy doing what he thought was best."

"It instantly evolved to perfection," said Jason Klagstad, who plays with the long-running Milwaukee rock band Plumb Loco and singer-songwriter Bill Camplin and was a founding member of Arroyo, a popular Milwaukee band in the 1970s and '80s.

The Hendrix miracle
But contrary to hindsight and much of Fender's own marketing material, the Strat did not take the musical world by storm.

"Buddy Holly had a lot to do with it" as the first rock star to use a Strat, Koch said. But Holly died in 1959, and despite being a talented player, was really known for his songs, not his guitar work.

"A lot of writers say it was an instant success," said Ringwald, "but in fact, only about 200 or 300 were made in the first year. A few blues players and some of the surf players, notably Dick Dale, kept it alive.

"Believe it or not, in the mid-'60s, after CBS bought Fender, they thought seriously about discontinuing it."

But the company held off, as if awaiting a miracle that would save the Stratocaster from oblivion. And lo, a miracle happened: Jimi Hendrix.

Hendrix, even more so than blues-rock innovators such as Clapton and Jeff Beck, took modern music to places it had never gone before and perhaps the only instrument that he could have done it with was the Fender Stratocaster.

Hendrix blended blues, R&B and balladry seamlessly, and when he turned the volume up, he created searing new styles that could not even have been imagined before.

"If people thought too much about what he did," said Koch, "their heads would explode."

Beck, Clapton and legions of other guitarists soon adopted the Strat based largely on Hendrix's innovations. Stevie Ray Vaughan, who idolized Hendrix, did as much to promote the Strat as any other player.

Guitarists' testimonials
Milwaukee's Daryl Stuermer, who has played guitar with Phil Collins since 1978 and will release a new solo album, "Retrofit," in September, sums up his feelings about the Stratocaster this way:

"I use only three guitars on tour - my roadie loves me - and one of them is a Strat. If I had to bring only one guitar, it would probably be a Strat. Every time I pick up a Strat, it just feels so good."

Koch agreed.

"You need to have a Strat if you want to work. If I go into the studio with one guitar, it's going to be a Strat. There are just important sounds that you can't get out of any other guitar."

Jim Eannelli, who plays with the band Salt Creek and owns Jim's Guitar Repair shop in West Allis, probably has seen the guts of as many Stratocasters as anyone outside the Fender factory. He says the reasons Strats have conquered the guitar world are "ergonomics, versatility and mechanics."

"He based his own philosophy on auto parts," Eannelli said of Fender. "It was like a '57 Chevy - you could work on it. And you can beat up on it, and it will come back for more."

Strat is a battle
Versatility is another of those words that comes to everyone's tongue when talking about the Strat. Yet it has its share of quirks that make it rather unforgiving in inexperienced hands.

"There's no place to hide on a Strat," Koch said. "The sound is so bright, the least mistake will stand out."

"Playing a Strat is a battle," Ringwald said. "But good players come to love that battle."

For one thing, Fender gave the Strat three pickups but only one volume control and two tone controls, with a pickup selector switch that doesn't allow certain combinations.

And despite Fender's best intentions, that "floating bridge" idea didn't work exactly as planned. In fact, Strats are notoriously hard to keep in tune.

Eannelli shrugs it off.

"Name me one award-winning design that doesn't have a design flaw," he said.

Stuermer, who just finished a European tour with Collins and is about to start the American leg of Collins' "First Final Farewell Tour," said: "I'm a tuning freak. I retune during songs all the time."

Perhaps those foibles are like a mole on a movie star, the beauty mark that calls attention to the perfection surrounding it. Which brings up the notion of what the Stratocaster really represents.

"It has this refulgence of tone," Klagstad said, "that leaves you feeling full and satisfied."

When he picks up a beloved vintage Fender, Klagstad added, "the neck feels like the flesh of a young woman. It is unbelievably sensual."

"It is," Koch said, "a sexy contraption."




From the July 20, 2004, editions of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

 

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