Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Another good reason why I listen to bands like the ABB

Universal Peach





Posts: 6009
(6064 all sites)
Registered: 1/19/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 12:18 PM
I'm glad that I grew up in a time when being able to play "LIVE" was important to musicians. I also like musicains who play "warts and all", instead of using tricks like "vocal tuning, cutting and pasting guitar licks, adding multitrack layering" to enhance their "live" performance. Thanks goodness they're still bands out like the Allmans, Little Feat and Dead that still think amd more importantly, play their music that way.

In Concert, but Not Live
Backing Tracks Find a Role Onstage

By Sean Daly
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, October 31, 2004

Joel Hamilton believes now is the perfect time for you pop-music fans to get a grip on reality. Your favorite singer just may be cheating on you.

Hamilton, a veteran music producer and sound engineer, doesn't think anyone should have been shocked by singer Ashlee Simpson's fakery on "Saturday Night Live" last week.



Ashlee Simpson, shown at the Radio Music Awards Monday, sparked a controversy when she was caught lip-syncing on "Saturday Night Live" Oct. 23. (Joe Cavaretta -- AP)

In fact, he says, instead of blaming her band or acute acid reflux disease for her performance-enhancement needs, Simpson should have simply told the truth.

"Backing tracks have been around as long as there have been tracks," says Hamilton, who works out of Studio G in Brooklyn, N.Y., and has been twiddling the knobs for both indie-rock upstarts and major-label heavyweights for more than 10 years.

Backing tracks -- that is, prerecorded tracks, either with or without vocals, that can help an artist better re-create an album performance -- can be used in different ways. Those venerable acts on "American Bandstand" were lip-syncing: mouthing along to their songs. Pink Floyd has used prerecorded tracks to add sonic rumble to its trippy concert shtick. And Madonna has used "guide vocals" -- prerecorded vocal tracks that a pop star can sing over to add oomph to her performance -- so she can dance, dance, dance and not sound winded.

Hip-hop acts and rappers employ prerecorded tracks all the time at "track dates," live events where someone, usually a DJ, provides everything but the vocal. "I'm not sure why people are more accepting if the guy [playing the tracks] is right out in front," Hamilton says.

He's also not sure what Simpson was up to -- whether it was straight-up lip-syncing or a guide-vocal situation. Besides, he says, there's a much bigger secret to be divulged from the "SNL" slip-up anyway.

Thanks to relatively recent advances in digital processing, using prerecorded tracks is merely one of myriad tricks that musicians from Britney Spears to Aerosmith to U2 rely on to give live performances the same slick sheen as their albums. Much of the digital derring-do that used to be accomplished in recording studios -- vocal tuning, cutting and pasting guitar licks, adding multitrack layering -- can now be done onstage.

"There's a surreal, cartoonesque perfection that people expect today," Hamilton says. "Everything is being manipulated."

Hamilton should know: He and his peers are the ones doing the manipulating. A computer-literate sound engineer has become a must for any musician or band today -- especially a band whose singer has trouble hitting, and holding, certain notes. Pitch correction, real-time processing and harmony generation don't sound very rock-and-roll, but Britney Spears, Cher, even art-rockers Radiohead would sound lousy -- or, depending or your tastes, lousier -- without the computer-based help.

"The analogy would be airbrushing," says Hamilton. "It's the same thing as in Playboy."

Performance-enhancement for pop stars, especially on a high-tech scale, is a relatively new trend. In 1997, Antares Audio Technologies -- a godsend to some, the death of authentic music to others -- developed revolutionary pitch-correction software called Auto-Tune, which allows a sound technician to smooth out a singer's voice, no matter how wobbly or screechy or off-key that voice may be. Just punch the desired key of a song into the computer, and the gizmo will adjust the pitch to the closest note in that key.

Auto-tuning, which is now being used onstage as well, did nothing less than change how pop music is made.

How powerful are Auto-Tune and PitchDoctor and similar software? Let's just say that if those ill-fated charlatans Milli Vanilli -- the '80s duo who became synonymous with lip-syncing and having someone else sing their vocals -- were around today, they might still be mouthing the words during shows, but they'd be mouthing the words to songs they actually performed in the studio.

Yes, pitch correction is a miracle drug. Bob Dylan and Tom Waits, musical icons whose careers are based on gargly vocals, have no use for it. But many other stars do.

"Take someone like Whitney Houston, for instance," says Ben Mellott, who operates the Nothing but Noise recording studio in Fairfax. "It's easy for her to drift flat or rise too sharp when she's holding a note. Auto-Tune would help her keep in tune."

Use the pitch device too much, however, and vocals can start to sound odd and mechanical, like a singing cyborg -- or Cher on her 1998 hit "Believe."

"I have trouble identifying Britney Spears's voice as a human voice," Mellott says. "I've never heard someone sing like that sitting in a room. But she's not going for realism -- she's going for show."

Roots-rocker Allison Moorer, on the other hand, apparently has different thoughts about auto-tuning. On copies of her 2002 album, "Miss Fortune," a sticker was attached: "Absolutely no vocal tuning or pitch correction was used in the making of this record."

"There's an internal debate in the industry about using this stuff," says Dave O'Donnell, a Grammy-nominated engineer who worked the soundboard for one of the biggest stars of the '80s. (O'Donnell, like all the other engineers interviewed, declined to specify the musicians with whom he's worked.) "But it's been blown out of proportion. It's a sign of the times. If you can fix something, you do. If you listen to old records, not everything's in tune. [These days], people overuse it. They like the perfection, but that just means they're inexperienced."

And the tricks just keep on coming: To further enhance a singer's vocals, sound engineers can use a device called a harmony generator: Just click a mouse and one Britney can suddenly sound like 100 Britneys. To give a band some help, gizmos called trigger pads can be attached to a drum kit and, when struck by the drummer, send signals to a computer. "You can hit the kick drum, for instance, and another sound altogether comes out," says Mellott. "You can play different sounds with each hit."

Guitarists are now equipped with effects pedals that can summon whole orchestras. Even advances in microphone technology can make a singer with a suspect voice sound like Sinatra. (Well, Frank Jr. at least.) "With the right type of mike, you can make a so-so singer sound powerful, and believe me, I've had my share of so-so singers," says Mellott.

The desire for perfection leads us back to Ashlee Simpson. The best way to re-create her studio sound in a live setting might be to run her voice through a processor and have her sing over backing tracks. Simpson "has been made to be something that requires backing tracks to achieve," Hamilton says, adding that the controversy surrounding her "is a weird judgment on something that wasn't supposed to have soul in the first place. That's like complaining about dinner after someone hands you a Snickers bar."

Simpson certainly isn't alone. Because select pop stars rely so heavily on pitch correction in the studio, they've been forced to bring high-tech trickery out on the road with them. And for entertainers whose stage show is even more important than the music, guide vocals are the way to go.

O'Donnell remembers seeing R&B crooner R. Kelly drop his microphone during a live arena performance -- but his vocals just kept on going. "His fans loved it," O'Donnell says. "They didn't care. They want the dancing. They want the show. Plus they knew Kelly really could sing."

"Guide tracks are very common," agrees Mellott. "Let's say Britney Spears is dancing around onstage. You expect her to hit every note when she's jumping around? A CD backup helps her put on a better show. It's what her fans want."

"This is something that has appeared more and more in the last 15, 20 years," Michael Jaworek, concert promoter for the Birchmere in Alexandria, says about all the new onstage technology. "So many artists in the of-the-moment pop realm do it. It seems to be occurring much more frequently."

Jaworek attributes a lot of it to "the cost of doing business." It's cheaper to bring a band in a small black box than a band on a tour bus. "This is why Enya won't tour," he says of the New Age pop star who uses lush orchestration and scores of vocal effects. "She feels she can't [properly] re-create her music live."

In the end, though, a pop singer or a rock band -- whether in the studio or on the stage, whether lip-syncing or using guide vocals -- ultimately has to have at least a smidge of chops.

"There's nothing that re-creates a passionate performance," Hamilton says. "You have to sound like you mean it."

At least for now.

 
E-Mail User
Replies:

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4506
(4574 all sites)
Registered: 4/13/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 12:31 PM
There's beena few jam sessions I've been to where auto-tune would have been a good thing ..................... Especially for the guitar players

 

____________________
Believin' is alright just don't believe in the wrong thing....Sonny Boy Williamson

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 29948
(30044 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 12:33 PM
I know what you mean Fred.

Bands like Prodigy or Moby that use all the midi tracks and
computers to do the music leave me kind of flat.

I remember thinking when Prodigy headlined the HFeStiveal at RFK
that they should have stayed at home and just sent the computers
to do the show.

Of course I've seen bands like Floyd and the Who using tapes.
I remember one Who show where Rabbit was pretending to
be playing along with the recorded keyboard track and Pete
shot him a look that made him stop.

At least Ashlee was thinking of our entertainment when she
broke into a jig.

Peace
John

 

____________________
People Can you Feel It?

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16865
(16863 all sites)
Registered: 1/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 03:57 PM
Go to an Aerosmith show and tell me where all the backing vocals are coming from? Many other bands are guilty also.

Hell before all this sampling stuff bands used to have extra musicians play unseen. Sitting to the side or behind the amps. Keyboards, guitars coming from nowhere. Nobody ever noticed that during ZZ Top songs there are two guitars playing? When Billy solos the backing chords are all there. i would respect them more if they just brought an extra guy on tour and let him be on stage instead of hidden. Aerosmith had that Chico guy on keyboards for years. At first, he was nowhere in sight. After a while, they put him just out of the light show. Why? We know he is there. Would people leave because they have a keyboardist? Ego pure and simple.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8718
(8718 all sites)
Registered: 11/12/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 08:21 PM
I want it all real and up front, please. An interesting example: Jeff Beck's last three studio albums have become increasingly "produced" and tweaked, each one much more than the previous, getting very cut and pasted on Jeff (2003).

In concert, though, he's such a strong musician, he doesn't need that stuff (much). In 2001 there was substantial drum supplementation for a sorta subpar drummer, Andy Gangadeen (and not much else; Jennifer Batten sometimes triggered loops and things on her guitar, but she mostly played everything live). In 2003 Jeff had a much better drummer, Terry Bozzio, who didn't need more drums (although there were a few brief prerecorded sounds that were apparent only in song intros). Jeff didn't have a second guitarist that time, and he did a-okay (to say the least; not as awesome as in 2001, but very fine playing).

Incidentally, Jeff produces a huge array of unique sounds, but he nearly goes straight into his amp. He uses a wah-wah just to get a certain tone, but then he doesn't play it with his foot. All that Jeff Beck sound is from his using most of the fingers on both hands and his whammy bar (doing amazing things with harmonics, left-hand bends, volume knob manipulation, and so on). Really astonishing!

After initially being put off by Steve Vai when he was with David Lee Roth in the mid-'80s, I started getting intrigued and impressed by him. Then after listening closer to his albums, I realized his beautiful guitar harmonies were automatically generated, and that brought him down a few notches in my eyes, or ears.

Finally, Jeff became disenchanted with the cut-and-paste technology while doing the Jeff album and has said that next time out he's going to get back to basics. Good for Jeff! I'm sure it will be a much more listenable album, too.

 

____________________
"This is an old true story;
this is called 'I Must Have Did Somebody Wrong.'
(I wonder who.)"

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19963
(20161 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 09:14 PM
quote:
i would respect them more if they just brought an extra guy on tour and let him be on stage instead of hidden


agreed...like the Rolling Stones with Chuck Leavell, and Ian MacLagan (right guy?) before him.

I saw Queen in concert during their heyday. You can't tell me Bohemian Rhapsody wasn't performed without a backing track. I caught on even back then!

60 Minutes ran their piece on Loren Michaels/Saturday Night Live that was filmed during the Ashlee debacle last week. When asked if other artists lip synched or used backing tracks, he begrudgingly admitted that they had in recent years if the performer(s) did alot of dancing.

 

____________________

 
E-Mail User

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2073
(2077 all sites)
Registered: 4/2/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 09:44 PM
quote:
quote:
i would respect them more if they just brought an extra guy on tour and let him be on stage instead of hidden


its like black sabbath now. i dont know if theyre still doing it but when i saw them 3 years ago there was a guy standing onstage but behind some stuff who played keyboard, sang backup and played guitar. it was very strange hearing a rythym guitar while iommi soloed.

 

____________________

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 703
(705 all sites)
Registered: 12/15/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/31/2004 at 10:39 PM
The Who do have some backing tracks, as was noted before. When I saw them in May, Baba O'Riley had the whole keyboard part pre-tracked, but that's probably because nobody could play that fast for such a long period of time. And what people were saying about hearing stuff when the player was in the background, with the Who, their new bassist i honestly did not even see until they played My Generation towards the end of the main set, and they had a backup guitarist (i think Pete' brother) who i couldn't see the entire show. It's kind of weird, but it was still a great concert.

Fortunately the Allman Brothers, Derek Trucks Band, Robert Randolph & the Family Band and pretty much every band i listen to don't do that, I think the live experience is what makes the artist, which is why i like the above three so much.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 12:40 AM
quote:
And for entertainers whose stage show is even more important than the music, guide vocals are the way to go.

O'Donnell remembers seeing R&B crooner R. Kelly drop his microphone during a live arena performance -- but his vocals just kept on going. "His fans loved it," O'Donnell says. "They didn't care. They want the dancing. They want the show. Plus they knew Kelly really could sing."

"Guide tracks are very common," agrees Mellott. "Let's say Britney Spears is dancing around onstage. You expect her to hit every note when she's jumping around? A CD backup helps her put on a better show. It's what her fans want."

I guess what they're saying ultimately is that a concert is just a show, and it's all good as long as the customer gets the best-quality product. That's probably true in its own right, and it seems to make the people who like that kind of music happy. But I'm glad the bands we like care about music as music, not a product. They're in it to play the music instead of just pleasing the audience.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 485
(503 all sites)
Registered: 8/20/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 07:57 AM
"Nobody ever noticed that during ZZ Top songs there are two guitars playing? When Billy solos the backing chords are all there. i would respect them more if they just brought an extra guy on tour and let him be on stage instead of hidden. "

I'm happy to report that when I saw the TOP this summer, there was no evidence of any backing tracks . Just playing live. It's about time, too..

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16865
(16863 all sites)
Registered: 1/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 08:09 AM
ZZ was using an actual guitar player. Plus they have to use samples for all those songs with the disco keyboard background. Legs and other songs.

The interesting part is that the hidden guitar player was doing some leads also. billy must think we are all stunned not to notice. hopefully they have returned to playing their stuff themselves. Nothing wrong with hiring a musician to help fill out the sound. Just put him on stage.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 09:00 AM
quote:
The interesting part is that the hidden guitar player was doing some leads also. billy must think we are all stunned not to notice. hopefully they have returned to playing their stuff themselves. Nothing wrong with hiring a musician to help fill out the sound. Just put him on stage.

I don't know why this is such an issue. Hiring a tour guitarist isn't unusual at all, especially for power trios. Must be an ego thing.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 67582
(67943 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 09:12 AM
quote:
quote:
i would respect them more if they just brought an extra guy on tour and let him be on stage instead of hidden


agreed...like the Rolling Stones with Chuck Leavell, and Ian MacLagan (right guy?) before him.

I saw Queen in concert during their heyday. You can't tell me Bohemian Rhapsody wasn't performed without a backing track. I caught on even back then!

60 Minutes ran their piece on Loren Michaels/Saturday Night Live that was filmed during the Ashlee debacle last week. When asked if other artists lip synched or used backing tracks, he begrudgingly admitted that they had in recent years if the performer(s) did alot of dancing.


Queen didn't even try and hide it - they left the stage during the "opera" part and showed the video, then came back on - there was no way they could duplicate it in concert...

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 09:19 AM
I watched the 60 Minutes piece also. Michaels was probably trying to cover his own ass; news articles about the little disaster made it clear that lip-synching and guide vocals are used more often than he said. I wonder if he was telling the truth about being surprised that she used the 'assistance.'

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 12:36 PM
i doubt it marley

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1424
(1439 all sites)
Registered: 10/5/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 01:15 PM
I caught a guy once using a sequenced keyboard part & acting like he was playing it. I was actually on stage with the guy & when I called him on it privately, he swore he was playing the part. Go figure???

 

____________________
I Miss Bill
FOR THE IMPROVENMENT OF THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN MACON

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 527
(529 all sites)
Registered: 4/11/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 05:11 PM
I knew a few guys when I was around Nashville that made their living being ghost players for some major country acts.
One of them was missed by a film editor and appeared in a concert video playing bass in a pit underneath the front of the stage while the star's sister was the "bass player" onstage.
The other played all of the live solos for a guy who won guitar player of the year awards several years running.
The cat didn't even record his guitar parts either. Yet another player handling that chore.
This doesn't surprise me one bit,
Technology is just making it easier to pull off in a" perfomance" setting.

 

____________________

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4292
(4356 all sites)
Registered: 12/5/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 05:23 PM
Ok bluesbasscat, I know you're probably referring to Garth Brooks sister for the bass, but I'm intrigued who you're refering to on guitar. I don't thinks it's Vince Gill. Cause Vince can smoke. Seen him do it. Tell us names already. This is the ABB Forum, HQ for rumor and inuendo for christ's sake.

-----------------------------------------------------

"I can't say that I've ever been lost, but I was bewilderd once for three days." - Daniel Boone

[Edited on 11/1/2004 by Charlesinator]

 
E-Mail User

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 527
(529 all sites)
Registered: 4/11/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 07:03 PM
Absolutely Vince is a smokin' player ! ! ! I had the good fortune of meeting him in a guitar repair shop in Cincy. Great guy.

Jeff Cook of Alabama is one of several , but he's the only one I'm willing to name.

 

____________________

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4292
(4356 all sites)
Registered: 12/5/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 07:50 PM
You know the majority of music that comes out of Nashville is made by only a handful of cats. Seriously nine times out of ten the lead guitar you hear on country radio is Brent Mason, the acoustic Marc Casstevens, the dobro is Jerry Douglas, etc. Sure there are exceptions and a few others, but that is the way it's been for years. Of course it was the same in Memphis and Muscle Schoals so I guess you can't argue with results, but it just seems antisomething. You know what I mean.

As for Jeff Cook, he may just be tired. He certainly didn't have anybody helping him all those years in the Bowery and for the first couple of records. Any country act live has at least 4 guitars onstage in their respective touring bands and all session players in country are credited with their contributions on the records except on the Greatest Hits packages.

Anyway thanks for the dirt Bluesbassist. I love the inside story.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

"I can't say that I've ever been lost, but I was bewildered once for three days." - Daniel Boone

 
E-Mail User

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 527
(529 all sites)
Registered: 4/11/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 10:07 PM
If it wasn't for Brent Mason , Kent Wells, Mike Chapman , Bob Britt , Larry Londin and some others that you mentioned , a lot of the Hat acts that came up in the late 80s and early 90s would never have had careers. Tim McGraw has made an effort to break that cycle by using his stage band on his last disc or 2 .
As far as Jeff Cook goes , I have no doubt about his ability in the early days, I worked with a bunch of folks who were instrumental in getting them their deal , but I never saw him one time from '88 on without at least 2 ghosts or visible backup players onstage with him and he certainly had no problem taking credit for Brent Mason's playing ,depending on the situation.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 15986
(15990 all sites)
Registered: 9/24/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 10:58 PM
greetings:

At a recent show in this local river marina (Sacramento) A youngster came up to our guitarist between sets and criticized us for doing our own backing vocals. He said " a real professional band would pay more attention to even the little details, especially since we were trying to do this tribute thing" and then walked off. Guess he never saw Van Halen in concert back in the day. I mean, he didn't get it, my drumset took up almost all the stage.... next stop Saturday Night Live BABY

 

____________________

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8718
(8718 all sites)
Registered: 11/12/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/1/2004 at 10:59 PM
The fake country guitarist I can't stand is the manic one of Brooks & Dunn. I'm speaking only from seeing videos and TV awards show appearances. He puts a lot of energy into a steady succession of "rock guitarist" poses--just obnoxious, especially his facial expressions, and especially since he isn't really playing.

Tonight I got a phone message saying I've won tix to see Keith Urban on Wednesday--I entered a slip into a sweepstakes box while waiting to talk to an insurance agent last week. I totally don't know Keith, so I looked up something, and there he is, rocking out with a Tele. He'd better not be fake!

 

____________________
"This is an old true story;
this is called 'I Must Have Did Somebody Wrong.'
(I wonder who.)"

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4292
(4356 all sites)
Registered: 12/5/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/2/2004 at 11:26 AM
Bluesbasscat, what I meant is that most of the country records I've seen will list additional musicians i.e. Brent Mason-guitar etc. Some have actually listed them by tracks (I always dig that.) though the greatest hits packages don't list them at all. Tell us more about the seedy underbelly of ol' Music City.

Peter Nelson, I agree with you on Brooks & Dunn. Not only does Kix Brooks fake his playing in some of the most cliched poses, he's holding one-of-a-kind custom shop Les Pauls real players can't even dream about. In Kix's defense he writes alot of their tunes, trite as they may be and Charlie Crowe, their guitarist on record and tour, is pretty good with a nice Carvin sponsorship. Also by all means go see Keith Urban. He is the real deal with some cool rock/country chops. A friend who went and saw him ironically opening for Brooks & Dunn said between songs he was playing AC/DC riffs. He is from down under you know. Not only that being the pretty boy he is, there should be lots of girls there. That always makes he concert going experience more pleasant. However, the fact that their are litterally no ugly country singers any more probably prevents some talented people from making it. I mean Merle Haggard would not be able to make in todays image driven top forty country radio.

--------------------------------------------------------

"I can't say that I've ever been lost, but I was bewildered once for three days." - Daniel Boone

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 31172
(31245 all sites)
Registered: 3/13/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/2/2004 at 12:10 PM
quote:

Tonight I got a phone message saying I've won tix to see Keith Urban on Wednesday. He'd better not be fake!


Keith Urban is most definitely not fake. The man can PLAY!!!! Unlike so many others in Nashville, he writes or co-writes most of his own stuff, plays multiple instruments, sings like he means it and produces as well

On a recent, CMT special, he was asked if he considered himself to be a "Guitar God."
"Oh no," he reponded. "That would be Duane Allman or Stevie Ray Vaughn" Keith is the real deal!

 

____________________
"Without going out of my door, I can know all things on Earth. Without looking out of my window, I can know all things in Heaven. The farther one travels, the less one really knows."

 
<<  1    2  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com