Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2    3    4  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Books I've Read

Super Moderator





Posts: 3870
(3929 all sites)
Registered: 6/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:28 AM

I'm an obsessive reader. I read books like some people eat popcorn.

I love to share special books with special people and have traded or passed on books more times than I can count. One of my favorite co-dependent readers is JNB's wife Vicki -- she and I have traded books back and forth for many years.

Those who know me well also know that I am never without my current paperback in my front left pants pocket -- you never know when it'll be needed. In the interest of passing along a few good books to the famABBly, and perhaps learning about a few as well, I'll post some of my favorites here. Please feel free to do the same.

This morning I finished a book titled Evolution by Stephen Baxter. It's long and thought-provoking, a great read. I learned more about primate evolution that I ever thought I would and enjoyed it immensely. This book is recommended.

Here's a recent review:

Review by John C. Snider 2003

It all started with a bang.

Of course, it's possible homo sapiens or something like us could have developed even if an asteroid (or comet) hadn't wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, opening up ecological niches that our distant proto-primate ancestors could exploit. But most scientists agree that the mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous were indispensable to mammalian - and human - evolution as we know it.

Aside from the scientific data, what must it have been like? What must our non-human progenitors have experienced - what adventures did they have? How close did they come to extinction? Further, what might our future be? Are human beings destined to rule Earth indefinitely - or are we doomed to the same fate as T. Rex and his kin?

Stephen Baxter tells this story - or one possible version of it - in Evolution. Baxter has dabbled in prehistoric fiction before (in his Mammoth series, including Silverhair and Longtusk, novels which document the travails of the last of the mammoths), but those were mere warm-ups for this ambitious and impressive epic spanning over a billion years of Earth's history. Told through a series of loosely connected episodes, Baxter begins with "Purga", a female purgatorius, a small and primitive primate who lives (barely) to see the extinction of the dinosaurs. Then, leaping forward, each time by 10 or 20 million years, Baxter peeks in on Purga's great-great-etc. grandchildren as they adapt to new climates, become new species, and spread across the globe. Roughly the first third of Evolution (200+ pages) is devoted to the stories of our pre-human grandparents, whose daily lives consist mostly of foraging, flinging **** at one another, and fleeing predators. Although Baxter's depictions are brilliant, with some inspired conjectures to spice up events, there's only so much drama that can be squeezed from foraging, **** -flinging and predator-fleeing.

Despite this early minor flaw, Evolution finds its stride as Baxter dramatizes the lives of our prehistoric human ancestors and their interactions with their distant cousins, which include the ill-fated Neanderthals. He shows us how the rise of intelligence itself begins to shape us as much as the ebb and flow of ice ages. He describes - at a very personal level - the ultimate destruction of hunter-gatherer culture by agriculture and "civilization".

After a brief vignette set during late-Roman times, Evolution moves into the future, when humanity has finally mastered the ability to evolve at will, so to speak - to tinker with our own DNA in dangerous and unexpected ways. And even then, homo sapiens are still no match for the might of Mother Nature. The final act of Evolution is intriguing, bittersweet, even shocking.

I highly recommend Evolution - it's long, and avoids easy answers and happy endings, but it does provide food for thought, confronts our notions of what it means to be human, and gives warning that nothing can be taken for granted in the ongoing struggle for survival.

 

____________________
"Don't Ask Why"

 
E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage
Replies:

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4239
(4988 all sites)
Registered: 3/18/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:56 AM
i love to read too hoppy and will check out that book.

we have other threads too; recommended reading.

first and foremost, i recommend Kahil Gilbran's THE PROPHET. look it up online, its freely published all over now for some reason. Gotta love the Net. by it. give it as gifts for graduation, people you love, your family. write something on the inside cover and reference a page in the book to the person. you will be bonded forever. i had a copy of it from a friend, lent it to someone and never got it back (never trust a fisherman).

i got more.

lets keep THIS thread going, BOOKS I"VE READ. maybe we should do a book trade thing.

i got lots.


 

____________________
You make me wanna wake up in the moring

Oh, you make me wanna be the best I can

Always searching but never finding

Oh, until you took me by the hand

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 02:25 AM
I happened across a booksale today, so I was thinking of starting a thread like this too. The last book I read was Moanin' at Midnight, a flawed but very good and thorough bio of Howlin' Wolf. About half the books I bought were journalism-related, some related to the Constitution and law, others were just literary journalism like the kind I want to do.

I don't really remember the last fiction book I read that wasn't assigned to me, so I think I may start there. Maybe Bonfire of the Vanities. The sale was "get a bag of books for $5," so I got myself yet another copy of The Great Gatsby (my other one is in New York) and Tender is the Night.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 29948
(30044 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 08:23 AM
Is that a book in yer pocket Ron?, Or are you happy to see me?

I just got the new Dr. Hunter S Thompson book "Hey Rube"

It is a collection of his ESPN page 2 "Hey Rube" columns and examines
sports, gambling, politics and culture during the Bush administration
from the sports desk.

If you read his columns regularly on ESPN it is nothing new.
But I have all his books so I had to get this one also.
I knew they would publish this when they took his old
columns off the espn web.

Peace
John

 

____________________
People Can you Feel It?

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7260
(7342 all sites)
Registered: 11/29/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 08:30 AM
Bonfire is a hoot, Marley...it's fiction, sure, but it isn't....one of the funniest books I ever read, yet the reality in this 'fiction' is quite disturbing.

 

____________________
I have an idea: let's pretend we're real human beings.

 
E-Mail User

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 14274
(14326 all sites)
Registered: 12/20/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 08:33 AM
Current: Rainbox Six, Tom Clancy

On deck: Armaggedon (next-to-last in the Left Behind series)
Hitler's Scientists (non fiction)

On the radar: Song of Susannah (latest Dark Tower Novel, come, come comalla).

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16571
(16571 all sites)
Registered: 6/4/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 08:58 AM
I recommend The Alienist by Caleb Carr to anyone who loves historical fiction and a great murder mystery. Excellent read.
 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2057
(2057 all sites)
Registered: 12/1/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 12:40 PM
I read "The Alienist" a couple of years ago and it was a great book, I also highly recommed it.

Finished "Song of Susannah", excellent read!

Recommendations:

James Rutherfurd, "Russka" & the newly released "Princes of Ireland Book 1".

Here Be Dragons, Falls the Shadow & the Reckoning by Sharon Kay Penman
is a trilogy of King John and his England, the favorite son of Henry Plantagenet, Llewelyn the Great of Wales, Simon de Montfort, Henry the III & his son Edward Longshanks and Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. I have to say this is one of the finest trilogy's ever written and I highly recommend it to anyone.

The Sunne in Splendour by Sharon Kay Penman is also a wonderful read about Richard the III and his brother Edward and the rise of the Tudor's to the throne.

The Rasputin File
by Edvard Radzinskii, Judson Rosengrant, Edvard Radzinsky
This story reads like a novel but tells a more accurate story of the Mad Monk, very enlightening and thought provoking.

Evolution sounds like a great read, one that I will be picking up along with the soon to be released Dixie Lullaby: A Story of Music, Race, and New Beginnings in a New South by Mark Kemp.






[Edited on 8/8/2004 by PattyG]

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19963
(20161 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:17 PM
One of my favorite books that I've probably read about a half dozen times (and loaned to others who loved it) is Rivethead, Tales From the Assembly Line by Ben Hamper. This is on the back cover:

Not since Hunter Thompson has an American writer delivered the kind of open-throated, full-barrelled blast of truth and gritty reality that Ben Hamper unleashes in this journey through the belly of the American Industrial beast. A former assembly line riveter at GM's Truck and Bus Division who rose to national prominence on the pages of Esquire, Harper's and Mother Jones, Hamper--a/k/a The Rivethead--uses a hard-edged driving prose style to chronicle his outrageous career as an unhinged assembly line grunt...this is an extraordinary story of humanity trapped in a netherworld of crashing noise, suffocating boredom, and absurdity that is by turns hilarious and tragic.

The foreword is written by Hamper's buddy, Michael Moore and Hamper had a brief role in Roger and Me as himself. I used to read his stories in the Detroit Free Press when I still lived in Michigan.

 

____________________

 
E-Mail User

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2057
(2057 all sites)
Registered: 12/1/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:24 PM
Stephen King has always been my guilty pleasure reading and does tend to be hokie i.e. the father twist, however without giving anything away to anyone who has not read the story the enjoyable twist for me was the incorporation of "Stephen King" into the story. I thought it was a pretty nice twist.

P.S. Terry your recommendation also sounds like a good read, I will be putting that one on the list as well

[Edited on 8/8/2004 by PattyG]

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13944
(14107 all sites)
Registered: 11/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:34 PM
I love to read, too. Have been on a biography kick lately (about musicians). Between Midnight and Day by Dick Waterman is a great book for any blues lover. It's mostly photographs, but he has a story behind each one and some are quite entertaining. I love reading about those old blues guys! In the fiction dept. I'm reading Beach Music by Pat Controy-pretty good so far. As far as thought provoking, try You Can Heal Your Life by Louise Hay. This woman cured herself of cancer! That book changed my whole way of thinking long ago. I recommend it highly.

 

____________________

"You play blues with all of you, not just your hands. Every bit of you is part of that music."

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13944
(14107 all sites)
Registered: 11/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 01:36 PM
quote:


lets keep THIS thread going, BOOKS I"VE READ. maybe we should do a book trade thing.




Great idea! count me in!

 

____________________

"You play blues with all of you, not just your hands. Every bit of you is part of that music."

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19963
(20161 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 02:03 PM
Pixielf, have you read B.B. King's autobiography entitled Blues All Around Me? It's one of my favorites. It reads like BB is sitting at your kitchen table telling you his life story. Etta James' autobio is very good as well. I can't find my copy so I must have loaned it to someone who didn't return it but I think hers and BB's were both co-written with David Ritz.

 

____________________

 
E-Mail User

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13944
(14107 all sites)
Registered: 11/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 02:18 PM
quote:
Pixielf, have you read B.B. King's autobiography entitled Blues All Around Me? It's one of my favorites. It reads like BB is sitting at your kitchen table telling you his life story. Etta James' autobio is very good as well. I can't find my copy so I must have loaned it to someone who didn't return it but I think hers and BB's were both co-written with David Ritz.


No Terri, I haven't, but THANKS, I will look for both of them! They sound very good and BB and Etta are king and queen in my book (no pun intended lol).

One of my favorite places to spend HOURS is of course, music stores-new and used, but secondly is new and used book stores. I even love the smell of an old book store.

 

____________________

"You play blues with all of you, not just your hands. Every bit of you is part of that music."

 

Super Moderator



Karma:
Posts: 3870
(3929 all sites)
Registered: 6/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:07 PM

Whoa! Looks like I've started something here ...

Why am I not surprised that many of the folks here in the Forum are inveterate readers? I guess the next step is to take Linnie's advice and start doing B&Ps -- Books & Postage trades!

I read mostly fiction, but maybe other's recommendations here will pique my interest to pick up a biography or other non-fiction book. And, yes John, I AM happy to see you ... but then I'm happy to see any of our famABBly. I limit my reading almost exclusively to paperbacks because I can stick them in pocket. Every now and then I'll go the extra effort to carry a hardback around, but only in exceptional cases.

I only read one book at a time. Many readers I know will start several books and be part-way through them all before finishing one. Not my style. I like to devote undivided attention to my current selection.

Has anyone read the Coalwood Trilogy (Rocket Boys [made into movie October Sky], The Coalwood Way, and Sky of Stone) by Homer Hickam? These three books each made me laugh and cry -- rare in any book -- and on finishing each one I was suffused with a lasting glow of genuine pleasure. Gotta love those endorphins!

 

____________________
"Don't Ask Why"

 
E-Mail User

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9072
(9466 all sites)
Registered: 12/1/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:22 PM
I'm glad you did start this, Ron!

Last book read: "Can't Be Satisfied: The Life and Times of Muddy Waters", by Robert Gordon.

Just began reading: "Empire Falls", by Richard Russo. I picked it up on a whim the last time I was in Barnes and Noble, and I'm only about forty pages into it.

 

____________________
"You shouldn't confuse things that are popular with things that are really good"--paraphrasing Bob Dylan.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 82631
(82990 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:40 PM
Hmm lets see...

The Cat In The Hat

Curious George Goes To The Circus

The Calvin And Hobbes Anthology

 

____________________
RIP Cindy Fischer
RIP Hugh Duty
RIP John Ott

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1703
(1810 all sites)
Registered: 4/20/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:46 PM
Rat, no Green Eggs and Ham??

 

____________________
Go Ask Alice


 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6432
(8677 all sites)
Registered: 12/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:46 PM
One of my all-time favorite books is The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love by Oscar Hijuelos. If the saw the awful movie they made based on this book, put it out of your mind and read the real thing. Beautiful writing.

 

____________________
This one goes to eleven...

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 82631
(82990 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:51 PM
quote:
Rat, no Green Eggs and Ham??



Ah yes. Green Eggs And Ham, Sam I Am

Not to mention Clifford the Big Red Dog.


Sorry guys, i will let you intellectual types have fun here.

Just couldnt resist.

I do like Seven Ambroses' work though.

 

____________________
RIP Cindy Fischer
RIP Hugh Duty
RIP John Ott

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23477
(24346 all sites)
Registered: 1/6/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:58 PM
Where's WALDO????
 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 82631
(82990 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 03:59 PM
quote:
quote:
Rat, no Green Eggs and Ham??



Ah yes. Green Eggs And Ham, Sam I Am

Not to mention Clifford the Big Red Dog.


Sorry guys, i will let you intellectual types have fun here.

Just couldnt resist.

I do like Steven Ambroses' work though.

 

____________________
RIP Cindy Fischer
RIP Hugh Duty
RIP John Ott

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 17361
(17416 all sites)
Registered: 9/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 04:14 PM
Great thread! I loved "The Alienist" by Caleb Carr. I read another by him, "Dark Angel" I think, that was good as well. I enjoyed the "Left Behind" series although I thought some of the plot lines were a bit flawed, and the last one, "Glorious Appearing", was not very good. Would recommend "Lonesome Dove" to anyone, the book is just great. Recently finished "A Case For Creation" by Lee Stroebl, very interesting, much better fare than most books of it's kind. Am reading "A Purpose Driven Life" and enjoying it.
 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2158
(2169 all sites)
Registered: 2/3/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 04:51 PM
I too also love to read for fun and I read as much as I can.
I'm currently reading "The Amazing adventures of Kavalier and Clay" by Michael Chabon and I just finished Chabon's "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh". I'm also reading Faulkner's "As I lay Dying", some short stories by Raymond Carver in his book "Cathedral", Flannery O'Connor's "A Good man is hard to find", and Mark Richard's "The Ice at the bottom of the world". I finished David Sedaris' "Me talk pretty one day" and I didn't find it as funny as "Naked" or "Barrell Fever". I really enjoyed reading Tobias Wolff's memoirs such as "This Boy's Life" and his short stories like "The Night In Question" are excellent as well.

 

____________________
Language is a virus from outer space.

 
E-Mail User

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13152
(14465 all sites)
Registered: 6/1/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 8/8/2004 at 05:24 PM
I am a huge fan of the books written by the Dhali Lama...I highly reccomend checking any of them out, you will not be disappointed.

 

____________________
I've got gold in the sunshine and diamonds in the dew.

 
<<  1    2    3    4  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com