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Author: Subject: steve miller

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 02:37 PM
fly as the eagle.......no more..too heayv ? too old ? too bad

he was very good in the '70 years, the Joker, Fly as the eagle....
and the albums : Number 5
Recall the Beginning: A Journey From Eden
The Joker
Fly Like an Eagle

still play this albums.......

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 02:40 PM
"silk and satin, leather and lace, black panties with an angels face".....


Steve Miller: Great Guitar player. i caught him a few years ago; great show. interestingly enough its a "jam band" type crowd at his shows, he's got a HUGE following still.

IMHO, a great player.

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 02:51 PM
All I know of Steve Miller are the radio hits . . . that "best of" album, for instance. However, I've come across his name several times when reading about the late 60's blues revival, alongside of names like Clapton, Johnny Winter, Ten Years After, etc. Didn't he play with Muddy Waters' band or something? What's up with that? Anybody got any straight blues featuring Steve Miller?

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 02:54 PM
i didnt know this! Steve Millers parents where good friends with Les Paul. Interesting article; everything you wanted to know about Steve Miller but didnt know to ask:

quote:
Steve Miller was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on October 5, 1943. His mother was an accomplished singer, and his father, Dr. George "Sonny" Miller, was a physician by profession and an amateur recording engineer in his spare time. Many members of Steve's family were musicians, and he received his first guitar at age 4. Steve put it to good use performing songs for his family and playmates.

Les Paul, the inventor of the electric guitar and multi-track recording, and his wife, Mary Ford, were regular visitors at the Miller house. In fact, Steve's father was best man at their wedding. Les and Mary taught Steve his first chords when he was five years old. Steve still uses some of the techniques they taught him at that time.

The Miller family moved to Dallas, Texas in 1950. Steve's dad continued recording various styles of music. Great musicians of the time continued to appear at the Miller house, including legendary blues man T-Bone Walker.

The Marksmen, Steve's first band, was formed when he was only 12 years old. This rock and roll band had a solid booking the entire semester playing mostly for fraternities. Steve taught his older brother to play bass so he wouldn't have to rely on his mother for transportation.

The Marksmen continued to play for 5 more years. In high school, Steve asked his friend, William Royce "Boz" Scaggs, to perform vocals with the band. The greatest moment for them was when they backed blues hero, Jimmy Reed, at a local night club. However, at age 16 Steve left for college, which forced the band to break up. Steve attended the University of Wisconsin at Madison and formed a new band called The Ardells. Steve taught Boz Scaggs some chords, and he joined The Ardells the next year.

Steve continued working with The Ardells through the school year and staying in Madison during the summers to perform with a group called The Knightranes. The next year, Ben Sidran was added on keyboards for The Ardells.

Steve spent a semester at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark during his senior year. He returned to the U.S. and spent the summer enjoying the Chicago blues scene, including working with a young musician named Paul Butterfield. Lacking 6 hours for a degree in literature, Steve decided to move to Chicago to play the blues. Steve was soon on stage with the likes of Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, and Buddy Guy, who all encouraged him to continue playing.

Miller met Barry Goldberg and with bassist Roy Ruby and drummer Maurice McKinley formed The Goldberg-Miller Blues Band, playing Chicago clubs. The band was signed to Epic records during a convention in town. The recordings from this group are few and include a single called The Mother Song; however, there is one track on the box set performed by this band. They also appeared on Hullabaloo with the Four Tops and the Supremes. They took on a running gig at a club in Manhattan, only to return to a dead Chicago blues scene.

Disheartened, Steve went back to Texas in hopes of taking some music courses at the University of Texas at Austin. He was not admitted, so he bought a used Volkswagen Microbus and headed to San Francisco. Upon arrival, he spent his last $5 to see the Paul Butterfield Blues Band and Jefferson Airplane at the Fillmore Auditorium. He jammed with Butterfield and announced his intention to stay in San Francisco.

Steve contacted Tim Davis, whom he knew from another band in Madison. Steve invited Davis and guitarist James "Curley" Cooke to come experience the San Francisco music scene. Adding Lonnie Turner on bass, the Steve Miller Blues Band was born. Miller was broke, sometimes sleeping in his van. The band landed a gig at the Avalon Ballroom, allowing Steve the money for an apartment.

The band debuted at the Avalon in January 1967, and they were an immediate success. They became a headliner at the Ballroom, playing at least once a month. They played the Fillmore in April, and they were booked for the Monterey Pop Festival in June. The week after Monterey, the Miller Blues Band backed Chuck Berry at the Fillmore Auditorium. This performance was recorded for an album (This is the only Miller Blues Band performance currently available on CD).

After Monterey, the band signed with Capitol Records. Steve demanded the most lucrative contract in music history, setting a new standard for future artists. Steve contacted old friend Boz Scaggs and invited him to join. Jim Peterman replaced "Curley" Cooke, and "Blues" was dropped from the band's name. The Steve Miller Band flew to England to record their first album with Glyn Johns as engineer. Children of the Future was released in May 1968 and was a staple of progressive FM stations throughout the country. Many would agree that this is one of the greatest debut albums ever.

The band did not see their first top 40 album until Sailor, released in October of the same year. This album featured Miller's first hit, Living in the U.S.A. and also introduced us to the Gangster of Love.

Peterman, tired of life on the road, and Scaggs, interested in pursuing his own career, left the group. Ben Sidran, who had worked with Steve in The Ardells, was invited to join. Brave New World was released June 1969. Johns and Miller mastered the album in England at which time Steve was allowed to sit in on a Beatles recording session. Miller and Paul McCartney recorded My Dark Hour with Paul appearing under the alias Paul Ramon. This song features Steve on lead and rhythm guitar, and McCartney on drums and bass. This top 40 album also introduced us to the Space Cowboy.

Your Saving Grace, released in November 1969, also made it in the top 40. This album, as well as the previous one, included some session work by keyboardist Nicky Hopkins whose talent is displayed marvelously on the track Baby's House.

Miller was increasingly recording with others outside of the band, and tensions were high among many of the members. The next album marked the loss of Lonnie Turner, replaced by Bobby Winkleman. Ben Sidran also left to pursue his own career. Steve took what tapes that had been recorded to Nashville, where in between dates on the road with the likes of Jimi Hendrix and the Grateful Dead, he completed the album with harmonica player Charlie McCoy, fiddler Buddy Spicher, and guitarist Wayne Moss. Number 5, released July 1970, was the greatest success to date.

The touring schedule was hectic, there was bickering between band members, and Capitol was constantly demanding new albums. At the same time, Steve was having some difficulties in his personal life, having married and divorced within a year. Tim Davis and Bobby Winkleman both left the group, replaced by Jack King on drums and Ross Valory on bass. Capitol, demanding yet another album, forced the cut of the next LP in one night. This album was taken to press after the first mix, and Steve was "ashamed of the album and sick at heart." Rock Love was released September 1971 to a comparatively dismal reception.

The next album, Recall the Beginning...A Journey From Eden featured session work by a variety of people. Released in March 1972, this album did not achieve the success of any of the others. However, the album deserves a second look with great tracks like Nothing Lasts, Journey From Eden, and Love's Riddle. Steve also introduced us to Maurice and the pompitous of love on Enter Maurice. Neither this album or Rock Love have ever been released on CD.

Miller broke his neck in a car wreck in 1972 while on his way to the airport for a European tour. He was in much pain, but he did not cancel the American leg of the tour until he fell ill with hepatitis. Steve went home to his parents in Dallas for eight months to nurse himself back to health. This was an important turning point in his career, and a time at which he did some deep reflection.

He returned to California, and with Gerald Johnson on bass, Dicky Thompson on keyboards, and Jack King on drums, emerged from the studio after 19 days with a brand new, more radio friendly sound. The Joker was released October 1973, and was the first album Steve had produced himself. He finally had a number 1 song. Touring increased with opening acts such as Boz Scaggs and James Cotton.

Between touring, managing his career, writing songs, and recording 8 albums in 65 months, Steve was exhausted. He decided to take some time off, and he spent the next year and a half writing and recording the bulk of his next two albums. Fly Like an Eagle was released May 1976, featuring Lonnie Turner on bass and Gary Mallaber on drums.

Book of Dreams was released one year and one day later with the addition of Byron Allred on keyboards and session work by Greg Douglass, David Denny, and Norton Buffalo. The two albums contained a string of multiple hit songs. The band was now playing arenas rather than theaters. Both albums were certified quadruple platinum.

Steve took another break after extensive touring through 1978. He bought a 500 acre farm outside of Grants Pass, Oregon, and married again. The recording studio he had built inside of his house never quite met his standards. He sold the farm, moved to Seattle, and his second marriage ended.

Lonnie Turner was replaced by Gerald Johnson, and the band released Circle of Love in 1981. This album almost made it in the top 20, and featured a minor hit song in the top 40--Heart Like a Wheel (which was also their first music video).

With the addition of Kenny Lee Lewis and John Massaro on rhythm guitar, Steve reached platinum status once again with the release of Abracadabra in June 1982. A live album and video were released the following year.

John Massaro and Gerald Johnson departed. Italian X Rays, the band's first digital recording, was released November 1984, but was not received as well as any album since Children of the Future. This despite the fact that it was probably one of Miller's best works.

Steve released Living in the 20th Century in 1986. This album yielded the hit I Want to Make the World Turn Around. However, the best part of this album was side 2. Drawing from his Texas roots, Steve performed great renditions of blues standards by Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon and others. These songs were recorded again during a private performance and released on the video Blues in the 20th Century.

Steve returned to his roots in 1988 with the release of Born 2B Blue with a completely new band (actually, he borrowed the use of Ben Sidran and his own jazz band). This album was never intended to be a chart topper, but it received much acclaim from music critics. This album earned respect rather than money, and it displays the versatility of the great Steve Miller. The album consisted of remakes of 10 jazz and blues standards.

In 1988, Les Paul invited Steve to appear on a Cinemax special with other great guitarists, including B.B. King, David Gilmour, and Eddie Van Halen. This was the first live performance by Steve Miller since 1983 (This is available on video under the title Les Paul and Friends: He Changed the Music). After the show, he attended a Pink Floyd concert at the request of Gilmour. Steve decided it was time to hit the road again.

Steve began touring again in 1989, not having done so since the Abracadabra tours in 1982 and 1983. Since then, his summer tours have consistently been a big attraction and a top grosser, growing in size every year.

June 1993 marked the release of his most recent album, Wide River. Added to Ben Sidran and his band were Ben's son, Leo, session guitarist David Denny, and the unbelievable harmonica player, Norton Buffalo. This album features a similar rock/pop/blues mix as exemplified in much of Steve's earlier work. In 1994, the box set was released with several previously unreleased tracks and one new song. Steve currently resides with his wife in Ketchum, ID.

Steve revived the Steve Miller Blues Band in late 1995, performing several all blues shows along the west coast. These performances were recorded for an album that may be released in the future. Also, during the summer of 1995, Miller and Paul McCartney worked together recording several original tunes. Some of these appear on Paul's album Flaming Pie.

Continuing to sell over a million albums per year, and performing at sold out concerts throughout the U.S., The Steve Miller Band is still going strong. The Steve Miller Band currently does not have any plans for a tour in 2001, but we all look forward to their next endeavor.




[Edited on 5/12/2004 by LinnieXX]

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 03:40 PM
Thanks Linnie. Cool read.

Steve Miller always puts on a great show. Many people only know the two Greatest hits albums as T. D. stated. But even those two albums give you 1.5 hours of great tunes.

Last time I saw him, Govt Mule was the opening act. With members of both bands sitting in with each other. When Warren and Woody joined Steve Miller, they improved his band in a huge way. Smiles all around and you could see the respect Miller had for the boys from the Mule. Great show with both bands really cooking.

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 03:45 PM
quote:
(This is the only Miller Blues Band performance currently available on CD)




Not true. They do "Mercury Blues" on the Monterey Box set.

I like the "Space Cowboy" era Steve Miller band best.

"I'm a Space Cowboy"

Peace
John

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 05:20 PM
I didn't like Steve Miller til I saw him live. He played a festival I went to in 78 and was just blown away by him.
I just got a Roy Rogers & Norton Buffalo show from 7/5/03 that Steve Miller sits in for 3 of his hits. A really good show.

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 06:04 PM
the first album...

children of the future...oh yeah...

junior saw it happen...

2nd, not bad...then boz skaggs quit and commercialism took the house....


those first 2...sweet

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 06:45 PM
I loved the Steve Miller Band in the 70's. He did some great stuff. Haven't really followed him since then. Thanks Linnie. I wanna check out this blues he's doing now. He certainly has the ability. His version of Come On in my Kitchen from The Joker album was killer!
 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 07:06 PM
i like him a lot-----just saw him 2 weeks ago at music midtown in Atlanta. He was verrrry good. His show was kinda slow at first, he didnt play much familiar, but more blues at first, even though it was good. But, the second half was all old stuff, and he ended with like a 12 minute version of fly like an eagle. He was quite good---sounds almost the same.

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 07:22 PM
I have caught him a few times. Puts on a great show

Some people call me the space cowboy
Some call me the gangster of love

 

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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 07:25 PM
I thought you were the gangster of love Chuck...
 
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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 07:27 PM
I'm just amazed by this thread! I think everyone who saw SM live said he put on a great show. When I saw him, I was terribly disappointed. It wasn't that he had an "off night." It just seemed to me that I could've stayed home and put on the Greatest Hits album and wouldn't have known the difference. I love his tunes, but I don't know that I'd recommend his shows. Oh well.
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  posted on 5/12/2004 at 07:28 PM

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 05:46 AM
quote:
I'm just amazed by this thread! I think everyone who saw SM live said he put on a great show. When I saw him, I was terribly disappointed. It wasn't that he had an "off night." It just seemed to me that I could've stayed home and put on the Greatest Hits album and wouldn't have known the difference. I love his tunes, but I don't know that I'd recommend his shows. Oh well.
Peace
Matt


I have a friend who says the same about the ABB. During the "Dickey" sets of the 90s, he would tell me what song was coming next. He would even say what Dickey would be saying next and to his credit- he would be right. To him all the ABB do/did is draw from the first three albums. He says to stay home and put on the Fillmore album. Different strokes for different folks. You won't get 20-30 min. improvs but Miller will hit you with hit after hit which more people enjoy anyway. It must be nice to have two hours worth of hits to sing. Sure beats the one hit wonders.

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 06:08 AM
Nice to see some Steve Miller love...
"Wild Mountain Honey"- one of my personal favorites.

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:12 AM
well, i thought that i was a big Steve Miller fan when i set out to see him; but only about half of his three hour show where hits that i knew (and i didnt get "Abracadabra" - a silly favorite of mine).

i think that was about the time he had a new album out; mid 90's i guess. turns out Mule was the opener (i think). Mule seems to have opened for every band i saw in the mid to late 90's.

anyway: steve miller is a great performer; no question about that.

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:22 AM
For those keeping score, Mule opened for Steve Miller in the summer of 1999.

I used to see him every summer for about 8 years or so. My friend got me into him. The comment about him playing a "greatest hits" show is accurate. And that's why my friends and I liked him frankly. Since we just saw them once a year, the songs we knew were what we wanted to hear. Only once did this not happen. I don't remember which year, but on one tour, he didn't have an opening act. Instead, he did two sets. For the first set, it was mostly obscure blues songs that only the diehard fan would recognize. The crowd didn't get into the show until the second set at the show I saw.

Regarding opening acts, he almost always had his opener join him on stage. The only time I recall him not having the opener join him was when The Doobie Brothers opened. I guess it would be hard to get 8 more people on stage. The strangest combo I recall has to be him with Pat Benatar. Strange one there.

Oh, and Linnie's right. He has (or did have at least) a huge following, mostly among younger college-aged kids. Not your hippie crowd, just younger folk.

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:25 AM
Used to see Steve in hometown Dallas every year. Caught him on his birthday once and he was into it even more than usual.

(fly like an eagle)

I want to run like a Beagle to the tree....
run like a Beagle so that I can take a pee....

we used to have the whole tune we would sing those were the days!!

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:31 AM
Book of Dreams was pretty much the background music to my beach trip during my junior year in high school. It will always be a special album to me for that reason. Yes I always dug Wild Mountain Honey and Jungle Love. Say what you will Steve was able to remain commercially viable and integrity intact throughout 3 decades. Clapton is the only other preson who comes to mind better in that aspect.

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:36 AM
Heh Heh. Still one of my favorite lines from a song.

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:38 AM
Get his box set

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:41 AM
I had 3rd row seats to see him in 2000 at Blossom Music Center. Well, let me clarify - I had 3rd row seats because Gov't Mule was opening. I really liked Steve up through about Fly Like An Eagle, but had lost touch with the band, knew at one time he was a bona fide blues artist but didn't really know what to expect. They opened up with ''Swingtown'' with all the band members doing this little 2-step in unison....we almost left right then and there but decided to stick it out for a while. After about 3 more songs Warren and Woody joined them and the band proceeded to launch into about 40 minutes of great blues, a couple nice Chicago style shuffles, and a killer ''Smokestack Lightning''. Steve was tearing it up on guitar. After Warren and Woody departed the show kind of deteriorated into a greatest hits by the numbers performance so we left. That was the last time I saw Woody perform. I still dig a lot of Steve's songs but I think a lot of his work has suffered from FM radio overkill, but like Canadian Mule said, how many bands have a couple hours worth of ''greatest hits''? Still listen to The Joker -''Your cash ain't nothin' but trash''

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 08:57 AM
My introduction to Stevie Guitar Miller was through my friend's (audiophile) killer sound system. Sailor sounded so good throught those huge speakers...especially Livin In The USA...you know-" and he takes it,Lefty Mudderbaugh in the Howard Cam Special" right at the end there and the foghorn on Song For Our Ancestorswere notables when we were "enhanced".When Boz left my interest died somewhat and the only live show was a huge disappointment,did about 5 songs and split cuz there were problems...

 

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  posted on 5/13/2004 at 09:01 AM
Wild Mountain Honey....Oh yes.

I'd go see the Steve Miller Band every year at Jones Beach. This was my summer beach show and they never failed to give me a good feeling. Okay...we had alot more freedom in the parking lot before the show and were able to bring coolers and frisbees and have a real good time prepping for the concert. I'm sure this had a little something to do with the vibe.

The year Mule opened for them was a strange pairing, I thought, but I'll always remember that night as special because Warren and Allan sat at a little table after their set and talked to anyone and everyone who stopped by. Two extremely nice fellas.
Last time I saw Woody, too.

That Norton Buffalo blows.....Heh.

 

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