Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Jimi Hendrix

A Peach Supreme





Posts: 2988
(2989 all sites)
Registered: 5/23/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/22/2013 at 11:24 AM
I heard Jimi in 1967. I had a few albums by Jimi, but never really got into them. I still don't get him.

What is it about his music that makes so many think so highly of him? To me, he was an interesting novelty musician, but (no disrespect intended), not much beyond that.

Billastro

 

____________________
Canis Major: The Original Skydog

https://www.davidmalin.com/fujii/source/CMa.html

"I can't say as ever I was lost, but I was bewildered once for three days."

—Daniel Boone

 
Replies:

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3801
(3798 all sites)
Registered: 12/11/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/22/2013 at 11:26 AM
Songwriting and singing on the first album are absolutely amazing for a debut album. I do know some folks who didn't care for his voice, but I always dug it.

 

____________________
Tim L.

 

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5806
(5861 all sites)
Registered: 5/4/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/22/2013 at 11:38 AM
IMO, it was the sounds and style he created from an electric guitar. He took it places where no one figured it could go. He did write some kick ass songs: Voodoo Chile, Little Wing, Cross Town Traffic plus many others.

I like Jimi Hendrix and appreciate his ability and style. If I'm having a party, I doubt any of his CD's would be put on the rotation. That being said, I love cranking his live version of "Hear My Train A' Coming" and Rockin' Out to it.

 

____________________
"It's all about Allman Brothers pride." T Thompson Greek Theater, Los Angeles 5/6/2005

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/22/2013 at 12:00 PM
If you don't like him, you don't like him. But he did more than any other single guitar player to expand the sound palette of the instrument. He wasn't the first guy to use a wah-wah or feedback, but nobody before him (and I'd say nobody since) did so much with them. He used them as a critical part of the music. I don't think anybody else had seen what you could do with that quote-unquote noise. There's still nothing quite like Machine Gun, to me. He wrote some great blues songs and some great psychedelic pop songs and I think he helped modernize the blues. There were artists who played loud electric blues before him, but I think Jimi was more successful in updating what great guitar players like Hubert Sumlin and Albert King and Magic Sam were doing and putting a contemporary spin on it. And to me he was able to make almost any jam just fascinating because of his playing and his use of those effects. I have lots and lots of Jimi b-sides and outtakes that wouldn't be that interesting if someone else were playing them, but with his style and vision there's always something cool going on.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Peach Head



Karma:
Posts: 69
(69 all sites)
Registered: 12/10/2011
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 12:39 AM
Guitar players worship Hendrix, perhaps moreso as the years go by. Check out this Mule cover of Watchtower http://youtu.be/RjjEffSc0mI

I really like Warren's upside down white Strat.

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7848
(7861 all sites)
Registered: 8/30/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 06:29 AM
I respect Jimi as a guitar player, being one myself. I do recognize what he did and meant to the evolution of that instrument. Very much a ground breaker. His style is just not my cup of tea.

 

____________________


 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6612
(6612 all sites)
Registered: 11/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 07:03 AM
The first time I ever heard the song Are You Experienced? I listened to it 10 times in a row and it changed my life. Hendrix has been my favorite musician since then, and it isn't close. I guess if you can hear that song and think "Eh, nothing special" then you'll never be as big a Hendrix fan as me.

I think the key to Jimi's greatness is his imagination. He was incredibly gifted at getting the sounds in his head out to the rest of us, especially considering the technology he was working with at the time.

If a lot of the better-known Hendrix stuff doesn't do it for you, give Axis: Bold As Love a try. Songs like Castles Made Of Sand and Little Wing would be highlights of any other artist's catalog, but in Jimi's case that album seems to fly under the radar. Bold As Love is one of the greatest songs ever written.

I would also highly recommend the Live At Winterland box set, definitely the best live Jimi, but that might be a big investment for somebody who isn't even sure they like Hendrix. It's an excellent set though.

 
E-Mail User

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5490
(5497 all sites)
Registered: 2/2/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 07:24 AM
I think Jimi is either a visceral or cerebral experience. Definitely not what you want on your CD player for a car ride. Not melodic (Billy Joel like) in the least.

That said "Watchtower" is in my alltime top ten (As Bob Dylan said - that song belongs to Mr. Hendrix now) and for enjoyable live Jimi I'm fond of.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6OedBFkxWU

simple and all the tricks

 

Peach Head



Karma:
Posts: 86
(86 all sites)
Registered: 6/1/2012
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 07:59 AM
I am 60 years old and when in high school I didn't get Hendrix either. I was a big Clapton fan and Led Zep. One day I'm hanging out with my friends and Hendrix comes on the radio, I think it was Still Raining Still Dreaming. I must admit I was feeling good at the time, but from that moment on Jimi was the man. I can listen to him today and still say I don't hear anyone like him. If he lived i believe he was going to evolve into a much cleaner jazz type of sound. which would have been a trip given the explosiveness of his beginning.
 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 572
(572 all sites)
Registered: 3/11/2012
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 08:47 AM
Eat a few grams of shrooms and put on Axis....If you still don't dig it, I can't help you....


p.s. The 'Band of Gypsys' is my favorite Jimi stuff. Not judging, but usually people really into ABB really dig Jimi as well....Or so I thought......

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 572
(572 all sites)
Registered: 3/11/2012
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 08:51 AM
quote:
I am 60 years old and when in high school I didn't get Hendrix either. I was a big Clapton fan and Led Zep. One day I'm hanging out with my friends and Hendrix comes on the radio, I think it was Still Raining Still Dreaming. I must admit I was feeling good at the time, but from that moment on Jimi was the man. I can listen to him today and still say I don't hear anyone like him. If he lived i believe he was going to evolve into a much cleaner jazz type of sound. which would have been a trip given the explosiveness of his beginning.


The out of print 'Message to the Universe' is sort of along these lines.......It's too bad for the world the Jimi/Miles Davis recording session never happened....I've heard it was because Miles wanted too much money. Who knows?...

 

Peach Bud



Karma:
Posts: 5
(5 all sites)
Registered: 8/28/2013
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 09:07 AM
I don't think Jimi was ever given enough credit for his vocals. Listen to his take on "Like A Rollin' Stone" from Monterey Pop Festival- the emotion in his delivery was always tear jerking for me. Gonna have to dig that one out!
 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 864
(864 all sites)
Registered: 2/8/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 11:28 AM
Well as Marley said, if you don't get him, you don't get him, but Hendrix is well deserving of the adulation from musicians and fans alike. There was nobody like him, before or after, his brief time in the spotlight.

Fully committed to music, always searching for new sounds and rhythms,
so he wouldn't be stuck or stereotyped by what he had done previously.
He could literally do any style of music, and add his unique flavor to it.
He was there for the psychedelic explosion (first album), a poppier if it can be called that collection of songs from Axis, touched on jazz during Electric Ladyland (and many thought he'd end up eventually in that direction) and was about to release an urban r&b/funk/rock type album when he passed away (First Rays of the New Rising Sun).
And he was of course steeped in the blues (check out the post-humous "Blues" album for that)

Not to criticize, but if you can't find something to like guitar wise in Jimi's brief, but prolific career, I just don't think you've listened to enough Jimi.

Here are some interesting words from Jimi's peers:

Albert Collins: "He didn't play nobody else's stuff...Jimi was original."

Buddy Guy: "One of those guys that was so explosive...Jimi basically played the blues but added to it."

Eric Clapton: "He liked Freddie and B.B. King, Robert Johnson and Buddy Guy. We liked all the same people...it was such a thrill because it was all secondhand for me. It was something I learned from records. This guy had been among them and was one of them."

Clapton: “What I found refreshing about him was his intensely self-critical attitude toward his music. He had this enormous gift and a fantastic technique, like that of someone who spent all day playing and practicing, yet he didn’t seem that aware of it.

Neil Young: "absolutely the best guitar player that ever lived; there was no one even in the same building as that guy."

Miles Davis "He had a natural ear for hearing music...it was great. He influenced me and I influenced him and that's the way great music is always made. Everybody's showing somebody else something and then moving on from there...Jimi Hendrix came from the blues, like me. We understood each other right away...he was a great blues guitarist."


Freddie Mercury: "Jimi Hendrix is very important. He's my idol. He sort of epitomizes, from his presentation on stage, the whole works of a rock star. There's no way you can compare him. You either have the magic or you don't. There's no way you can work up to it. There's nobody who can take his place."

 

____________________
Assumption is the mother of all f*ck ups.- D. Lindley.


 

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5098
(5098 all sites)
Registered: 7/18/2010
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 12:48 PM
ask skydog
 

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5822
(5827 all sites)
Registered: 7/4/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 04:50 PM
quote:
I don't think Jimi was ever given enough credit for his vocals. Listen to his take on "Like A Rollin' Stone" from Monterey Pop Festival- the emotion in his delivery was always tear jerking for me. Gonna have to dig that one out!


I will never tire of listening to that song Like a Rolling Stone from Monterey pop festival is a masterpiece of music and vocals Jimi is still the man.... play on Mr Hendrix

 

____________________
"Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the
Government take care of him; better take a closer look at the American Indian." -Henry Ford

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6612
(6612 all sites)
Registered: 11/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 05:03 PM
One more quick comment to Billastro--if you think of Jimi as a "novelty musician" then this probably applies to you...

"if you can't find something to like guitar wise in Jimi's brief, but prolific career, I just don't think you've listened to enough Jimi."

The "novelty musician" comment makes me think you consider Jimi mainly in terms of setting his guitar on fire, or playing with lots of feedback and effects. There was a LOT more to Jimi than that. He was one of the greatest songwriters who ever lived, and created plenty of music that didn't rely on gimmicks or flash or novelty value.

 
E-Mail User

Peach Head



Karma:
Posts: 92
(92 all sites)
Registered: 9/2/2013
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 08:49 PM
I think Marley summed it up best - Hendrix expanded what the guitar was capable of; he practically made a new instrument out of it. This old jazzhead thinks Hendrix was a genius. Strangely, I didn't toatlly get his music until I got into Albert Ayler, the most radical of jazz saxophonists. At his wildest, Ayler left behind melody, swing, even individual notes - he turned the tenor saxophone into an instrument of pure sound. In his own way, that's what Hendrix did with the guitar. I agree with Marley - "Machine Gun" is Hendrix's masterpiece of sonic mayhem.

And his feeling for the blues was as deep as Duane Allman's - although expressed differently, of course. "Red House," "Catfish," "Hear My Train A-Comin'" - these are as deep as it gets.

And to my ears, the seemingly endless string of vault releases from the Hendrix estate aren't just scraping the bottom of the barrel. (Well, a few tracks are.) I've got a lot of them, and most of the stuff is as good, or almost as good, as anything released during Jimi's lifetime. I'm grateful for them, and grateful for Jimi Hendrix.


 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4942
(4941 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 09:05 PM
quote:


The "novelty musician" comment makes me think you consider Jimi mainly in terms of setting his guitar on fire, or playing with lots of feedback and effects. There was a LOT more to Jimi than that. He was one of the greatest songwriters who ever lived, and created plenty of music that didn't rely on gimmicks or flash or novelty value.


agreed
Little Wing, The Wind Cries Mary, and Castles Made of Sand are among the best songs ever written.
Jimi could blow your mind with songs like that, blues like mentioned above (don't forget Vood Chile), and psychedelic sounds like Are You Experienced, his rendition of Star Spangled Banner, and of course, as mentioned, Machine Gun

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11252
(11270 all sites)
Registered: 3/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 09:56 PM
quote:
I heard Jimi in 1967. I had a few albums by Jimi, but never really got into them. I still don't get him.

What is it about his music that makes so many think so highly of him? To me, he was an interesting novelty musician, but (no disrespect intended), not much beyond that.

Billastro


If you gotta ask, you'll never know......

 

____________________
"Love Like You've Never Been Hurt"-Satchel Paige

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11252
(11270 all sites)
Registered: 3/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 09:57 PM
quote:
If you don't like him, you don't like him. But he did more than any other single guitar player to expand the sound palette of the instrument. He wasn't the first guy to use a wah-wah or feedback, but nobody before him (and I'd say nobody since) did so much with them. He used them as a critical part of the music. I don't think anybody else had seen what you could do with that quote-unquote noise. There's still nothing quite like Machine Gun, to me. He wrote some great blues songs and some great psychedelic pop songs and I think he helped modernize the blues. There were artists who played loud electric blues before him, but I think Jimi was more successful in updating what great guitar players like Hubert Sumlin and Albert King and Magic Sam were doing and putting a contemporary spin on it. And to me he was able to make almost any jam just fascinating because of his playing and his use of those effects. I have lots and lots of Jimi b-sides and outtakes that wouldn't be that interesting if someone else were playing them, but with his style and vision there's always something cool going on.


What Marley said.

 

____________________
"Love Like You've Never Been Hurt"-Satchel Paige

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11252
(11270 all sites)
Registered: 3/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 10:00 PM
quote:
The 'Band of Gypsys' is my favorite Jimi stuff.


Mine too.

 

____________________
"Love Like You've Never Been Hurt"-Satchel Paige

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7618
(7618 all sites)
Registered: 10/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 10:36 PM
quote:

The first time I ever heard the song Are You Experienced? I listened to it 10 times in a row and it changed my life. Hendrix has been my favorite musician since then, and it isn't close. I guess if you can hear that song and think "Eh, nothing special" then you'll never be as big a Hendrix fan as me.


My experience (pun intended) with Are You Experienced was about exactly the opposite. The title cut was not played on the radio in the 60's.............Purple Haze and Foxey Lady WERE. And of course because of those AM radio tunes (FM came into vogue a bit later), I knew who Jimi was and was curious. So in 1969, at 14 years old, two years after Are You Experienced was released, I rode my bicycle down to the local record store and bought the Are You Experienced album.

I just did NOT get it! I didn't like it much at all; looking back, Jimi was just WAY over my head. Now I think the tune Are You Experienced is pure genius, and I'm convinced that the record is most likely the most groundbreaking rock record of all-time.

 

____________________
Don't let the sounds of your own wheels
Drive you crazy
Lighten up while you still can
Don't even try to understand
Just find a place to take your stand
And TAKE IT EASY

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 10:43 PM
quote:
quote:
I don't think Jimi was ever given enough credit for his vocals. Listen to his take on "Like A Rollin' Stone" from Monterey Pop Festival- the emotion in his delivery was always tear jerking for me. Gonna have to dig that one out!


I will never tire of listening to that song Like a Rolling Stone from Monterey pop festival is a masterpiece of music and vocals Jimi is still the man.... play on Mr Hendrix

Yes, it is. It seems like he was very shy about his singing but he turned in some great performances - like Have You Ever Been (To Electric Ladyland). I love first verse or two of Bleeding Heart from that Valleys of Neptune comp. He sounds really confident there and I wish it lasted for the whole track.
quote:
quote:
The 'Band of Gypsys' is my favorite Jimi stuff.

Mine too.

You know, it's weird- it went from being the album I played the least to the one I play the most. I'm not a Buddy Miles fan at all and there's way less songwriting on that than his studio albums, but they're such great jams. Machine Gun is an incredible piece, Them Changes has some of the best wah-wah playing of anybody anywhere, We Got to Live Together is so funky and has a great solo, and if I had one vote for the best guitar riff ever, I'd pick Power of Soul.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4555
(4608 all sites)
Registered: 1/1/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/23/2013 at 11:42 PM
quote:
If you don't like him, you don't like him. But he did more than any other single guitar player to expand the sound palette of the instrument. He wasn't the first guy to use a wah-wah or feedback, but nobody before him (and I'd say nobody since) did so much with them. He used them as a critical part of the music. I don't think anybody else had seen what you could do with that quote-unquote noise. There's still nothing quite like Machine Gun, to me. He wrote some great blues songs and some great psychedelic pop songs and I think he helped modernize the blues. There were artists who played loud electric blues before him, but I think Jimi was more successful in updating what great guitar players like Hubert Sumlin and Albert King and Magic Sam were doing and putting a contemporary spin on it. And to me he was able to make almost any jam just fascinating because of his playing and his use of those effects. I have lots and lots of Jimi b-sides and outtakes that wouldn't be that interesting if someone else were playing them, but with his style and vision there's always something cool going on.


i think jeff beck takes the guitar to places no one thought it would go and is still expanding the horizons

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1962
(1969 all sites)
Registered: 6/7/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/24/2013 at 02:24 PM
quote:
What is it about his music that makes so many think so highly of him?
Billastro


When considering the impact of Jimi Hendrix you have to consider the musical landscape from which he came. He was "discovered" and taken to England by Chas Chandler in 1966. There was no popular music that sounded like Hendrix in 1966. Chuck Berry tarnished his career with a stint in jail. Elvis was lost in Hollywood. Buddy Holly, Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens were dead. Rock & Roll was barely hanging on but it was surging again thanks to the Mersey Beat and the British Invasion.

There were The Beatles who were still a year away from Sgt. Pepper, the Rolling Stones who were still catching on and doing pop versions of Chicago Blues. Dylan had just gone electric, Cream had just formed earlier in the year. Blues was popular in England while Bobby Vinton was popular in United States. 1966 also gave birth to The Monkees in the US. The Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane were only a year out of the gate and not well known outside California yet. There were no records by The Doors, Iron Butterfly, Jeff Beck Group, or Led Zeppelin yet. The Who was still playing pop music and their Maximum R&B.

Hendrix came from the Chitlin circuit in the USA playing with R&B and soul bands like Little Richard, The Isley Brothers, Sam Cooke, Wilson Pickett; basically anyone who needed a guitar player. He picked up knowledge of rhythm, chord shapes, tones, harmony, melody, dynamics, and stage presence from playing with these guys for several years in the 60's. But Hendrix wasn't just into R&B. He liked pop music, blues, Rock & Roll like Chuck Berry and Elvis, and he had an infinite imagination when it came to sound. he also had the talent and ability to make those sounds reality.

Hendrix either directly pioneered and/or was part of a pioneering movement in distortion, feedback, tape effects, wah-wah, flanging, phasing, and backward recording. He layered instruments making the most of the "new" 4 track stereo recording machines. He heard music made in multiple levels. He heard soundscapes and pushed his engineers to make them real. His first single was in October 1966 - Hey Joe. It might seem tame by today's standards but compare it to what was on the air in October 1966: Neil Diamond, Simon & Garfunkel, The Association & The Four Tops.

Hey Joe arrived ahead of the first Cream album which came out in December 1966 - Fresh Cream, which is on the poppy side, much removed from the blazing live performances that were to come later. Hendrix was of his time but he was ahead of his time. He was the perfect storm of songwriter, musician, composer, performer and entity in time that only comes around once in a while. He was playing music that matches the intensity of Are You Experienced? well before it hit the shelves. It's the music Chandler heard and prompted him to bring Jimi to England where he knew it would be recognized and rewarded.

Hendrix represents a paradigm shift in how the electric guitar is considered when creating music. He unlocked the potential of electronics in music, and multi-track recording. He will be remembered for his innovations, his live performances, and his vast body of work which reveals new nuances every time you listen to it. He kept recordings of ideas as he developed them and future generations will be able to learn from Hendrix' examples of how to build songs from single ideas and make them better than the sum of their parts. he brought together a myriad of influences and ideas and shaped them into something the world had never heard before thus changing music and musicians forever.

That's what it is about his music that makes so many think so highly of him.

 

____________________
Do not panic!
http://jimkanavy.com
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=name&id=1124427931
http://www.americanbluesscene.com

 
<<  1    2  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com