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Author: Subject: I was right and I will not apologize for it ...

Sublime Peach





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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 04:34 PM
But you all knew that anyway, right









[Edited on 11/30/2012 by jerryphilbob]

 

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"If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace."

- John Lennon

 
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A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 04:52 PM

Forced Hot tub confiscations?

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 05:14 PM
me too


 

True Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 05:36 PM
me too

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 05:38 PM
quote:
me too





I love this one!

 

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Sometimes we can't choose the music life gives us - but we damn sure can choose how we dance!


 

Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 07:07 PM

 

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"What we do in life echoes in eternity."




 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 07:09 PM
You know what they say it's a sign of weakness. At least Leroy Jethro Gibbs says it.......

 

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Danny Spell

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2012 at 09:05 PM
quote:

Forced Hot tub confiscations?


More like torturing us in the FEMA camps while the NWO sit outside the fence in the hot tubs enjoying it all!

 

____________________
"Mankind is a single nation" "Allah did not make you a single people so he could try you in what he gave you, to him you will all return, he will inform you where you differed". Quran Chapter 2 Sura 213

 

Sublime Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 07:12 AM
Robert Welch nails it ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZU0c8DAIU4

 

____________________
"If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace."



- John Lennon

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 09:10 AM
as long as this doesn't happen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmFYHmGkfxw

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 01:57 PM
Is THAT a baby- ruth bar floatin in the hot- tub or did someone drop a deuce

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 05:15 PM
FEMA camps.


Still on that nutjob kick, eh gina?

 

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Hittin' The Web::Hugh Duty Memorial Giveaway has begun!

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Peach Master



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 06:01 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/rick-perry-reverses-himself-calls-hp v-vaccine-mandate-a-mistake/2011/08/16/gIQAM2azJJ_story.html

Gov.Perry (Republican) order by law, girls of 13 or so MUST be vaccinated for HPV .
----------------

If our country keeps wanting to go to war and stay there in the Middel-East ( a region that lives in war as part of the culture with a people who have been in war since the time of Christ and always be at war), then you will need to have the draft here.
-----------------------------------

Jerry, you are right and not so far off. :-)

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 11/29/2012 at 10:12 PM

 

True Peach



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  posted on 11/30/2012 at 11:09 AM
you spelled "apologize" incorrectly.

therein lies the irony.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/30/2012 at 12:43 PM
I thought the ironic part was that he thought he was right..........

 

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Sublime Peach



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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 06:52 AM
The CFR owns you. You work for them. Get used to it.

Even Hillary admits the CFR is in control ....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba9wxl1Dmas

Co-Chairman of the Board
Carla A. Hills

Co-Chairman of the Board
Robert E. Rubin

Vice Chairman
Richard E. Salomon

President
Richard N. Haass

Board of Directors
John Abizaid former Commander, CENTCOM
Peter Ackerman founder, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict
Fouad Ajami professor in Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins
Madeleine K. Albright former Secretary of State
Henry S. Bienen former president, Northwestern University.
Alan Blinder economics professor, Princeton
Mary Boies managing partner, Boies & McInnis
David G. Bradley chairman, Atlantic Media Company
Tom Brokaw former editor, NBC Nightly News
Sylvia Mathews Burwell Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Kenneth M. Duberstein former White House Chief of Staff
Martin Feldstein economics professor, Harvard
Stephen Friedman former chairman, Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board
Ann M. Fudge former CEO, Young & Rubicam
Pamela Gann president, Claremont McKenna College
J. Tomilson Hill vice chairman, The Blackstone Group
Donna Hrinak former U.S. diplomat
Alberto Ibargüen John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
Shirley Jackson president, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Henry R. Kravis co-founder, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.
Jami Miscik former Deputy Director for Intelligence
Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Kennedy School of Government
James W. Owens chairman, Caterpillar Inc.
Peter G. Peterson chairman, Peter G. Peterson Foundation
Colin L. Powell former Secretary of State
Penny Pritzker CEO, Pritzker Realty
David M. Rubenstein co-founder, The Carlyle Group,
George Erik Rupp president, International Rescue Committee
Frederick W. Smith CEO, FedEX
Joan E. Spero former ambassador
Vin Weber CEO, Clark & Weinstock
Christine Todd Whitman former Governor of New Jersey
Fareed Zakaria editor-At-Large, Time

Some of the corporate members follow, most of which are on the Fortune 500 list.
ABC News
Alcoa
American Express
AIG
Bank of America
Bloomberg
Boeing
BP
Chevron
Citigroup
Coca Cola
De Beers
Deutsche Bank
ExxonMobil
FedEx
Ford Motor
General Electric
GlaxoSmithKline
Google
Goldman Sachs
Halliburton
Heinz
Hess
IBM
JP Morgan Chase
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.
Lehman Brothers
Lockheed Martin
MasterCard
McGraw–Hill
McKinsey
Merck
Merrill Lynch
Motorola
Nasdaq
News Corp
Nike
Pepsi
Pfizer
Shell Oil
Sony Corporation of America
Tata Group
Time Warner
Total S.A.
Toyota Motor North America
UBS
United Technologies
United States Chamber of Commerce
U.S. Trust Corporation
Verizon
Visa [5]

Notable current council members
Roger Ailes (Chairman and CEO of Fox News)
Madeleine Albright (64th United States Secretary of State, 20th United States Ambassador to the United Nations under Bill Clinton)
Lamar Alexander (45th Governor of Tennessee, United States Republican Senator, 5th United States Secretary of Education under George H.W. Bush)
Eliot Abrams (international lawyer, former state department official under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush)
Morton I. Abramowitz (diplomat)
John Abizaid (U.S Army General, former head of CENTCOM)
Michael F. Adams (President of University of Georgia)
John B. Anderson (former Republican/Independent congressman from Illinois)
Anthony Clark Arend (international lawyer, and academic)
Fouad Ajami (academic, middle east analyst)
Howard Baker (13th Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate, 12th White House Chief of Staff under Ronald Reagan, husband of Nancy Kassebaum Baker)
James Baker (61st Secretary of State of the United States under Bush-41, and 67th Secretary of the Treasury of the United States under Ronald Reagan, 10th & 16th White House chief of staff to President's Reagan and George H.W. Bush)
Thurbert Baker (former Democratic Party attorney-general of the state of Georgia)
Michael D. Barnes (former United States Democratic congressman from Maryland, and president of the Brady Campaign)
Charlene Barshefsky (former United States Trade Representative)
Reginald Bartholomew (diplomat)
Evan Bayh (former Democratic U.S senator and 46th Governor from Indiana)
Peter Bergen (journalist, national security analyst for CNN)
Joe Biden (47th Vice-President of the United States)
Josh Bolten (22nd White House chief-of-staff under George W. Bush)
Rudy Boschwitz (former Republican United States Senator from Minnesota)
Sandy Berger (19th United States National Security Advisor under President Bill Clinton)
Warren Beatty (actor, film producer, director)
Jeffrey Bewkes (president of Time Warner)
Stephen Biddle (theorist setting U.S. counter-insurgency policy)
Michael R. Bloomberg (108th Mayor of New York City, founder of Bloomberg L.P.)
Bill Bradley (former Democratic senator from New Jersey, NBA hall of fame basketball player)
Ian Bremmer (Eurasia Group founder and president)
Lael Brainard {Under Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs, wife of Kurt M. Campbell}
Bill Brock (50th chairman of the Republican Party, 8th U.S. trade ambassador and 18th United States Secretary of Labor under Ronald Reagan, former Republican United States Senator from Tennessee)
Dan Burton (Republican Party United States congressman from Indiana)
Erin Burnett (journalist, CNN anchor)
George H.W. Bush (41st President of the United States)
Tom Brokaw (NBC journalist)
Howard Berman (Democratic Party United States Congressman from California)
Peter Beinart (academic, columnist)
Richard Branson (founder of Virgin Group)
L. Paul Bremer (diplomat)
Edgar Bronfman, Sr. (a member of the Bronfman dynasty, president of the World Jewish Congress)
Ethan Bronner (deputy foreign editor of The New York Times)
Zbigniew Brzezinski (10th United States National Security Advisor under President Jimmy Carter)
Stephen Gerald Breyer (United States Supreme Court justice)
Jonathan S. Bush (healthcare CEO, son of Jonathan Bush, brother of NBC entertainment reporter Billy Bush)
Sanford Bishop (Democratic Party United States congressman from Georgia)
David Boren (former Democrat U.S. senator from Oklahoma and president of the University of Oklahoma)
Kurt M. Campbell {Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, husband of Lael Brainard}
Jimmy Carter (39th President of the United States)
Frank Carlucci (16th Secretary of Defense and 15th U.S. national security adviser under Ronald Reagan, 13th deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency under Jimmy Carter)
Dick Cheney (46th Vice-President of the United States)
Juju Chang (journalist, reporter for ABC News)
Bill Clinton (42nd President of the United States)
Hillary Rodham Clinton (former first lady of the United States, 67th United States Secretary of State under Barack Obama)
Henry Cisneros (10th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Bill Clinton)
Mario Cuomo (Democratic politician, 52nd Governor of New York)
Michael Crow (president of Arizona State University)
Katie Couric (former CBS and NBC journalist, talk show host)
Stephen F. Cohen (professor of Russian studies at NYU, husband of Katrina vanden Heuvel)
Edward F. Cox (international attorney, chairman of the New York Republican party, son-in-law of Richard Nixon)
William M. Daley (24th White House chief of staff under Obama, 32nd secretary of commerce under Bill Clinton)
Kathryn Wasserman Davis {American philanthropist}
Kenneth Duberstein (13th chief of staff under Ronald Reagan)
Peggy Dulany (fourth child of David Rockefeller)
Joseph Duffey (academic, educator)
Chris Dodd (Former United States Senator from Connecticut)
Thomas R. Donahue {former Secretary-Treasurer of the AFL-CIO}
William H. Donaldson (former chairman of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission)
Michael Dukakis (65th and 67th governor of Massachusetts, 1988 Democratic Party nominee for the Presidency)
Mervyn M. Dymally (former Democratic congressman from California)
James S. Doyle (journalist & activist)
John Edwards (former Democratic U.S. senator from North Carolina, 2004 Democratic Vice-Presidential nominee)
Karl Eikenberry (United States Army General, ambassador to Afghanistan)
Ari Emanuel (head of Endeavor Agency)
Roger W. Ferguson, Jr. (former vice-chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Noah Feldman (academic and author)
Dianne Feinstein (United States Democratic Party Senator from California)
Donald M. Fraser (former Democratic United States congressman from Minnesota)
Bill Frist (Republican politician, former United States Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate)
Mikhail Fridman (Russian oligarch, International Advisory Board member)
Thomas Friedman (columnist for The New York Times)
Martin Feldstein (economist, Harvard professor)
Tom Foley (57th speaker of the United States House of Representatives)
Francis Fukuyama (political scientist, for state department official)
Pamela Gann (President of Claremont McKenna College, former dean of Duke University School of Law).
Robert M. Gates (22nd United States Secretary of Defense under Bush & Obama, 15th Director of Central Intelligence under George H.W. Bush)
Robert P. George (Academic, professor at Princeton University, theologian, philosopher)
David Geffen (president of Universal Music Group)
Leslie Gelb (former journalist for the New York Times)
Dick Gephardt (22nd Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives)
Sam Gejdenson (former Democratic Party United States Congressman from Connecticut)
Alan Greenspan (13th Chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Maurice R. Greenberg (former chairman and CEO of AIG)
Bob Graham (Democratic Party 38th governor of Florida and United States Senator)
Janet G. Mullins Grissom (Republican lobbyist,former state department official)
David Gergen (advisor to Richard Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton, commentator for CNN)
Peter C. Goldmark, Jr. (former CEO of New York Port Authority, president of Rockefeller Foundation, publisher of International Herald Tribune)
Mikhail Gorbachev (former President of the USSR)
Roy M. Goodman (former Republican member of the New York State Senate)
Newt Gingrich (58th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives)
Ruth Bader Ginsburg (United States Supreme Court justice)
Brian Grazer (producer and co-founder of Imagine Entertainment)
Tenzin Gyatso (14th Dalai Lama)
Richard N. Haass (former State Department official)
David A. Harris (director of the American Jewish Committee (AJC))
Lee H. Hamilton (former United States Democratic congressman from Indiana)
Michael Hayden (United States Air Force general, 15th director of the National Security Agency under Bill Clinton, and 20th director of the CIA under George W. Bush)
Gary Hart (former Democratic U.S. Senator from Colorado, Council for a Livable World chairman, advisory board member for the Partnership for a Secure America)
Heather Higgins (women's advocate, chairman of the Independent Women's Forum, president of the Randolph Foundation)
Chris Heinz (heir to the H. J. Heinz Company ketchup fortune)
Carla Anderson Hills (5th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Gerald Ford, 10th United States Trade Representative to George H.W. Bush)
Kim Holmes (foreign policy and defense expert)
Douglas Holtz-Eakin (economist)
Auren Hoffman (investor/entrepreneur)
Warren Hoge (American journalist, formerly of the New York Times)
Malcolm Hoenlein (vice-chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations)
Katrina vanden Heuvel (editor of The Nation, wife of Stephen F. Cohen, daughter of William vanden Heuvell}
William vanden Heuvel (diplomat and international lawyer, father of Katrina vanden Heuvell)
Jimmy Iovine (chairman of Interscope-Geffen-A&M)
Frederick Iseman (businessman, inventor)
Angelina Jolie (actress, UN Goodwill Ambassador)[6]
Vernon Jordan (advisor to President Bill Clinton)
Nancy Johnson (former Republican United States congresswoman from Connecticut)
Woody Johnson (investor, owner of the New York Jets, heir to Johnson & Johnson)
Sheila Johnson (businesswoman, president of the Washington Mystics)
Walter H. Kansteiner, III (American diplomat)
Peter J. Katzenstein (political scientist, academic)
Robert Kagan (cofounded Project for the New American Century)
Nancy Kassebaum (former Republican Senator from Kansas, daughter of Alf Landon, and wife of Howard Baker)
Thomas Kean, Sr. (Republican politician, 48th Governor of New Jersey)
John Kerry (United States Senator of Massachusetts, 2004 Democratic Party nominee for the Presidency)
Vanessa Kerry (doctor of medicine, liberal activist, daughter of John Kerry)
Henry Kissinger (8th National Security Advisor under Richard Nixon and 56th United States Secretary of State under President's Nixon and Ford)
Joe Klein (Time Magazine columnist)
Paul R. Krugman (economist, columnist for the New York Times)
Anil Kumar (businessman, former senior partner at McKinsey)
Charles Krauthammer (columnist for the Washington Post and political commentator at Fox News)
Zalmay Khalilzad (26th ambassador to the United Nations under George W. Bush)
Philip Lader (diplomat, chairman of WPP Group)
Richard W. Lariviere (Scholar, President of the University of Oregon)
Jim Leach (former Republican United States congressman from Iowa, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities under Obama)
John Robert Lewis (Democratic United States congressman from the state of Georgia, famed civil-rights leader)
Jim Lehrer (journalist, former anchor for PBS)
Joe Lieberman (United States Independent Senator from Connecticut)
Lewis Libby (attorney, former chief-of-staff to Vice-President Dick Cheney)
Nigel Lythgoe (television producer)
Fred Malek (businessman, former President of Marriott Hotels and Northwest Airlines)
David Malpass (economist, Republican Party politician)
John McCain (United States Republican Senator from Arizona, 2008 Republican Party nominee for the Presidency)
Bud McFarlane (13th national security advisor to Ronald Reagan)
William Green Miller (United States Ambassador to Ukraine under Bill Clinton)
George J. Mitchell (17th Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate}
Walter Mondale (42nd Vice-President of the United States)
Robert Mosbacher, Jr. (businessman, son of Robert Mosbacher)
Les Moonves (President and Chief Executive Officer of CBS)
Bill Moyers (former press-secretary to Lyndon Johnson, public commentator for PBS)
David Mulford (former United States Ambassador to India and current Vice-Chairman International of Credit Suisse)
Rupert Murdoch (founder/chairman/CEO of News Corp and Fox News)
Heather Nauert (journalist and anchor for Fox News)
Janet Napolitano (3rd United States Secretary of Homeland Security under Obama, 21st Governor of Arizona)
John D. Negroponte (former United States Deputy Secretary of State and former Director of National Intelligence under George W. Bush)
Joseph Nye (academic)
Sandra Day O'Connor (former United States Supreme Court justice)
Stan O'Neal (former Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Merrill Lynch)
George Pataki (Republican politician, 53rd Governor of New York)
Henry Paulson (74th United States Treasury Secretary under George W. Bush)
Robert Pastor (national security adviser, son-in-law to Robert McNamara)
David Petraeus (United States Army General, former head of CENTCOM, 22nd director of the CIA)
Peter G. Peterson (20th United States Secretary of Commerce under Nixon)
Steve Pieczenik (former state department official, 911 conspiracy theorist)
Kitty Pilgrim (journalist and anchor on CNN)
Richard Pipes (academic, father of founder/director of Middle East Forum Daniel Pipes)
Daniel Pipes (academic, writer, historian, son of Richard Pipes)
Norman Podhoretz (former editor-in-chief of "Commentary", senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, Project for the New American Century (PNAC) signatory)
Steve Poizner (California businessman and Republican politician)
Roman Popadiuk (former United States Ambassador to Ukraine, Executive Director of the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation)
Colin Powell (65th United States Secretary of State under Bush-43, 16th National Security Advisor under Reagan, 12th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under Bush-41)
Tom Petri (Republican United States congressman from Wisconsin)
Priscilla Presley (actress and former chairwoman of the board of Elvis Presley Enterprises)
Charles Prince (former chief executive officer of Citigroup)
Jennifer Raab {President of Hunter College}
Janet Reno (78th United States Attorney General under Clinton)
Condoleezza Rice (66th United States Secretary of State under Bush-43)
Dan Rather (journalist, formerly anchor at CBS)
Charles Rangel (United States Democratic Congressman from New York City)
Alice Rivlin (economist, former U.S. cabinet member)
David Rockefeller, Jr.
John D. Rockefeller, IV (United States Democratic Party Senator of West Virginia, 29th Governor of West Virginia)
Charlie Rose (PBS journalist and The Early Show anchor)
Liz Rosenberg (publicist)
Chuck Robb (64th Governor of Virginia, former Democratic Party U.S. Senator from Virginia, son-in-law of Lyndon B. Johnson)
Edward Regan (former state comptroller of New york)
Robert Rubin (70th Secretary of the Treasury under Bill Clinton)
Haim Saban (founder of Saban Capital Group)
Jeffrey D. Sachs (American economist)
Diane Sawyer (ABC News journalist)
Stephen M. Schwebel (jurist, former judge on the International Court of Justice)
Michael Shifter (academic, president of the Inter-American Dialogue)
Dan Senor (former foreign policy advisor to George W. Bush, former Fox News foreign policy analyst)
Amity Shlaes (Bloomberg News columnist, and historian)
Timothy Shriver (chairman & CEO of the Special Olympics)
David Stern (commissioner of the NBA)
John Spratt (former Democratic United States congressman from South Carolina)
Karenna Gore Schiff (daughter of Al Gore)
Olympia J. Snowe (Republican United States Senator from Maine)
Brent Scowcroft (9th & 17th United States National Security Advisor under Presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush)
George Shultz (60th United States Secretary of State under Reagan, 62nd United States Secretary of the Treasury and 11th United States Secretary of Labor under Richard Nixon}
Frederick W. Smith (CEO and founder of FedEx)
Andrew Ross Sorkin (business journalist for New York Times and CNBC)
Walter B. Slocombe (former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy)
George Soros (currency speculator, investor, businessman)
Lesley Stahl (CBS News journalist)
Donna Shalala (18th United States Secretary of Health and Human Services under Bill Clinton, President of the University of Miami)
Eduard Shevardnadze (2nd President of Georgia)
Eric Shinseki (7th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs under Obama, 34th Chief of Staff of the United States Army under Clinton & Bush)
Adlai Stevenson III (former Democratic United States Senator from Illinois, son of Adlai Stevenson II)
George Stephanopoulos (former White House press-secretary under Bill Clinton, Good Morning America anchor, This Week with George Stephanopoulos host)
Laurence H. Silberman (United States federal judge)
Robert Silvers (editor of New York Review of Books)
Stansfield Turner (United States Navy Admiral, 12th director of the CIA under Jimmy Carter)
Doug Turner (Republican party operative/Politician, public relations operative)
Richard Thornburgh (76th Attorney-General of the United States of America under Reagan & Bush, 76th Governor of Pennsylvania)
John L. Thornton (chairman of Brookings Institution, academic, former president of Goldman Sachs}
Fred Thompson (attorney, actor, radio talk-show host, former Republican United States Senator from Tennessee,)
Shirley Temple (actress, diplomat)
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (Former Democratic Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, member of the Kennedy family)
Tom Vilsack (30th United States Secretary of Agriculture under Obama, 40th Governor of Iowa)
Paul Volcker (12th Chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Rick Warren (American Christian leader, Senior Pastor of the Saddleback Church)
Peter J. Wallison (20th White House Counsel to Ronald Reagan, former lawyer to Nelson Rockefeller)
Barbara Walters (ABC News journalist)
Vin Weber (former United States Republican Congressman from Minnesota)
Steven Weinberg (American physicist)
John C. Whitehead (chairman of the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, former United States Deputy Secretary of State under Ronald Reagan, former Goldman Sachs chairman)
Christine Todd Whitman (50th Governor of New Jersey, 9th administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under George W. Bush)
Shirley Williams, Baroness Williams of Crosby (British member of parliament, International Advisory Board member)
Richard S. Williamson (diplomat, lawyer, former chairman of the Republican Party of Illinois)
Oprah Winfrey (media mogul, actress, founder of Harpo Inc.)
James D. Wolfensohn (former president of the World Bank)
Paul Wolfowitz (10th President of the World Bank, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense under Bush-43)
James Woolsey (16th Director of Central Intelligence under Bill Clinton)
Dov S. Zakheim (academic and Department of Defense official under Reagan and George W. Bush)
Paula Zahn (journalist, former anchor at Fox News and CNN)
James Zogby (academic, political commentator and pollster)
Robert Zoellick (11th President of the World Bank)

[edit] Notable historical members
Kenneth Bacon (American journalist)
Conrad Black (International Advisory Board member)
Tom Braden (former CIA agent and liberal journalist)
George Wildman Ball (American diplomat)
Spruille Braden (American diplomat, businessman)
McGeorge Bundy (National Security advisor for Presidents John F. Kennedy & Lyndon B. Johnson)
William Bundy (Central Intelligence Agency agent, historian)
William F. Buckley, Jr (commentator, publisher, founder of the National Review)
Jonathan Bingham (Democratic congressman from New York, diplomat)
Paul Cravath (lawyer, one of the founders of the Council on Foreign Relations)
Monica Crowley (former Richard Nixon aide, radio host, and columnist)
John Chafee (former Secretary of the Navy, and Republican senator from Rhode Island)
Warren Christopher (former United States Secretary of State)
Thomas E. Dewey (47th governor of New York, former Republican nominee for President in 1944 and 1948)
Michael Raoul Duval (attorney for Richard Nixon & Gerald Ford)
C. Douglas Dillon (57th Secretary of the Treasury of the United States under John F. Kennedy & Lyndon Johnson, under-secretary of state under Dwight D. Eisenhower)
Allen Dulles (former Director of the CIA)
John Foster Dulles (52nd Secretary of State of the United States under Ike Eisenhower)
Lawrence Eagleburger (former United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush)
Jeffrey E. Epstein (financier)[7]
Rowland Evans {journalist}
John Exter {economist}
Gerald Ford (38th President of the United States of America)
Geraldine Ferraro (former Democratic New York congresswoman, first woman on a major party presidential ticket in 1984)
Alexander Haig (United States Army General, 59th Secretary of State of the United States under Ronald Reagan)
Sidney Harman (businessman, owner of Newsweek)
Armand Hammer (businessman, investor)
W. Averell Harriman (48th Governor of New York, diplomat, 11th United States Secretary of Commerce under Harry S Truman)
H. John Heinz III (former Republican United States Senator from Pennsylvania)
Richard Holbrooke {diplomat, investment banker, 22nd United States UN Ambassador}
Herbert Hoover (31st President of the United States)
Henry Hyde (former Republican congressman from Illinois)
Sergei Karaganov (International Advisory Board member)
Irving Kristol (journalist, writer, dubbed "The godfather of neoconservatism, father of Bill Kristol)
Jack Kemp (Hall of Fame quarterback, Republican congressman from New York, 9th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Bush-41, 1996 Republican Vice-Presidential nominee)
George Kennan (diplomat, historian)
Jeane Kirkpatrick (diplomat, 16th United States Ambassador to the United Nations)
Ivy Lee (founding father of public relations)
Robert A. Lovett (4th Secretary of Defense of the United States under Truman)
Robert Matsui (former Democratic Party congressman from California)
John J. McCloy (lawyer, banker)
Charles Peter McColough (businessman)
George McGovern (former Democratic senator from South Dakota, 1972 Democratic Party nominee for President)
Robert McNamara (8th Secretary of Defense under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 5th President of the World Bank)
Daniel Patrick Moynihan (diplomat, former Democratic Senator from New York)
Edmund Muskie (58th Secretary of State of the United States)
Richard M. Nixon (37th President of the United States)
Paul Nitze (Secretary of the Navy under Lyndon Johnson)
Nelson Rockefeller (41st Vice-President of the United States, and Governor of New York)
John D. Rockefeller 3rd
Felix Rohatyn (investment banker)
Mark B. Rosenberg (President of Florida International University)
Eugene Rostow (former dean of Yale law, legal scholar)
Walt Rostow (7th National Security advisor to Lyndon Johnson)
Dean Rusk (54th Secretary of State of the United States under Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson)
Abraham A. Ribicoff (former Democratic United States Senator from Connecticut)
William V. Roth, Jr. (former Republican United States Senator of Delaware).
Carl Sagan (American scientist)
Arthur Schlesinger (historian, academic)
Raymond P. Shafer (former Republican governor of Pennsylvania)
Tony Snow (former press secretary to George W. Bush, journalist, radio talk-show host)
Ron Silver (actor, director, producer, co-founded One Jerusalem)
Strobe Talbott (diplomat, chairman of Brookings Institution, journalist)
Cyrus Vance (57th Secretary of State of the United States under Jimmy Carter)
Vernon A. Walters (United States Army General, 17th U.S. ambassador of the U.N.)
John Wheeler III (Vietnam veteran, military consultant, presidential aide; found murdered on Dec. 31, 2010)
Paul Warburg (banker)
Caspar Weinberger (15th Secretary of Defense for the United States under Ronald Reagan)
Albert Wohlstetter
Roberta Wohlstetter

[edit] List of Chairmen
Russell Cornell Leffingwell 1946–53
John J. McCloy 1953–70
David Rockefeller 1970–85
Peter G. Peterson 1985–2007
Carla A. Hills (co-chairman) 2007–
Robert E. Rubin (co-chairman) 2007–

[edit] List of presidents
John W. Davis 1921–33
George W. Wickersham 1933–36
Norman H. Davis 1936–44
Russell Cornell Leffingwell 1944–46
Allen Welsh Dulles 1946–50
Henry Merritt Wriston 1951–64
Grayson L. Kirk 1964–71
Bayless Manning 1971–77
Winston Lord 1977–85
John Temple Swing 1985–86 (Pro tempore)
Peter Tarnoff 1986–93
Alton Frye 1993
Leslie Gelb 1993–2003
Richard N. Haass 2003–

 

____________________
"If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace."



- John Lennon

 

True Peach



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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 11:00 AM
...and all this time I thought my grandchildren owned me...
 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 12:51 PM
quote:

Even Hillary admits the CFR is in control ....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba9wxl1Dmas

Co-Chairman of the Board
Carla A. Hills

Co-Chairman of the Board
Robert E. Rubin

Vice Chairman
Richard E. Salomon

President
Richard N. Haass

Minister of Propoganda and Doomsaying
J.P.B.





quote:
...and all this time I thought my grandchildren owned me...

They do own the most important part of you, piacere...

 

____________________
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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 01:17 PM
History is repeating itself. It's not that difficult to understand.

http://www.historyhome.co.uk/europe/weimar.htm

Weimar Germany 1919-1933



--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----

Weimar Germany was the name given to the period of German history from 1919 until 1933. It got its name from the fact that the constitution for the post war republic was drawn up at the town of Weimar in South Eastern Germany. The town was chosen for the constituent assembly because it was peaceful compared to revolution torn Berlin and as a signal to the Allied peacemakers in Paris. The hope was that the Allies would treat more leniently a new peaceful German Republic rather than the militaristic empire that had led Germany into war.

The History of the Republic can be divided into three main areas:

1. The Years of Turmoil, 1919-1923
2. The Stresemann Era, 1924-1929
3. The Collapse of Weimar, 1930-1933

1. The Years of Turmoil, 1919-1923
The Republic

As the First World War drew to a close, morale in the army and at home collapsed. A series of defeats led to strikes throughout Germany. The Sailors at the Kiel naval base mutinied rather than sail to for a final showdown with the British fleet. Soldiers, sailors and workers formed councils or soviets with echoes of events in Communist Russia.

The Kaiser, William II abdicated and went into exile in Holland. A republic was proclaimed with the SPD leader Frederich Ebert as Chancellor (Prime Minster). The first act of the new government was to sign the armistice with the Allies. Many including Adolf Hitler saw this as an act of treason and the men who agreed to surrender became known as the “November Criminals.”

The new republic faced a host of problems. These included:

Over two and half million Germans had died in the war and four million were wounded.
The army and many other Nationalist groups in German society were unhappy that the Kaiser had been forced to abdicate. Some of these owed a very shaky allegiance to the new republic. Many were completely hostile and viewed the government with contempt.
Economic problems were serious, including rising prices, unemployment and a continued Allied blockade.
Germany faced the prospect of a harsh treaty that was being negotiated in Paris.
The Spartacus Revolt

Even before the constitution had been drawn up there was a serious challenge from the left. Many hoped to see a Russian style revolution in Germany. The left wing Spartacus movement led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg began a revolt in Berlin in January 1919. They seized building throughout the city. The government fled the city.

Many feared the “red plague” and the defence minister Gustav Noske used the army and the Freikorps to crush the revolt. The Freikorps was a volunteer militia made up of ex army men set up to defend the borders of Germany. It was strongly anti-communist and took brutal steps to restore order with summary executions becoming common place. Liebknecht and Luxemburg were shot and the revolt was crushed. In Bavaria another Communist revolt was defeated with Freikorps help in May. Political violence had marred the foundation of the new state.

The New Constitution

Despite the Spartacus revolt, the majority of Germans voted for parties in January 1919 that favoured the new democratic republic. These parties were the SPD, the liberal DDP and the Catholic Centre party. The constituent assembly met at Weimar in February 1919 and Ebert was chosen as president.

The new constitution was very democratic. Germany was to be a Federal state with the states or Lander retaining considerable control over their own affairs. The parliament (Reichstag) was to be elected every four years with a system of proportional representation that meant it was impossible for one party to get an overall majority.

All people over the age of twenty could vote. The Reichstag dealt with issues such as tax, trade, defence and foreign affairs. As there were a large number of political parties, there were many coalition governments. During the fourteen years of the Weimar Republic, there were twenty separate coalitions. The longest government lasted two years. This political chaos caused many to lose faith in the new democratic system.

The head of state was to be the president who was elected every seven years. The president was the commander of the armed forces and was designed to a largely figurehead position. He did have the power to dissolve the Reichstag and to nominate the Chancellor who was to enjoy the support of the Reichstag. Crucially under Article 48, the president could declare a state of emergency and rule by decree. He could also veto laws passed by the Reichstag that he did not like.

The Main Political Parties
The parties of the Republic

The SPD (Social Democrats) were a moderate socialist party and the largest of the parties committed to the Republic. It was strongly anti-communist.
The Centre Party (Zentrum) was set up to defend Catholic interests in 1870. It drew support from all classes. It was present in every Weimar coalition government until 1933. The BVP was its Bavarian ally.
The DDP (German Democratic Party) was a middle class Liberal party. It lost support rapidly after 1920. In 1919 it received 19% of the vote. By 1932 this was down to 1%.
The DVP (German People’s Party) had reservations about the new Republic and at heart they were Monarchists. They were supported by the middle-classes. The outstanding political figure of the Weimar Republic, Gustav Stresemann, was the leader of this party. Its highest point of support was in 1920 when it received 14% of the vote. By 1932 this was down to 2%.
The opposition of the left

The USPD (Independent Socialist Party) had broken from the SPD in 1917 because they did not support Germany’s continued participation in WWI. It declined rapidly after 1920 with the rise of the Communist party.
The KPD (Communist Party) was formed from the Spartacus Union that had led a revolt against the Weimar government in January 1919. It was very closely allied to Moscow and it refused to co-operate, in any way, with the parties that supported Weimar. They were especially hostile to the SPD. This refusal to support Democratic parties went as far as allying with the Nazis (their sworn enemies) in Reichstag votes. This was in order to further destabilize the Republic
The opposition of the right

The DNVP (German National People’s Party) was set up in 1918. It was composed of supporters of the old Monarchy. It had strong rural support especially in Protestant areas. They were Hitler’s coalition partners when he came to power in 1933.
The NSDAP (National Socialist German Worker’s Party) was founded in Munich in 1919. At first it favoured the violent overthrow of the Weimar Republic. But after the failed Putsch of 1923 it adopted a legal approach to achieving power. The onset of the Great Depression and the economic chaos of the 1930s greatly aided its rise. It came to national prominence in 1930 when it won 18% of the vote and by 1932 it was the largest party in the Reichstag.
The Treaty of Versailles

The news of the treaty came as a complete shock to the new government and to the German people. Virtually all sections of German opinion denounced the treaty. It was known as the Diktat as Germany had been forced to sign the treaty. On the day it was signed, Germany’s Protestant churches declared a day of national mourning.

Germans were outraged at the loss of her colonies and her territory and population to France, Belgium and Poland. She also resented the limitations placed on the size of her army and navy, the ban on an air force and tanks and the demilitarisation of the Rhineland.

She felt that the principle of self-determination had been ignored in the case of the Germans of Austria and the Sudetenland. She believed that the War Guilt Clause and the reparations payments were unjust. One effect of the Treaty was an immediate lack of confidence in the politicians that had signed it. This was reflected in the poor performance of the parties that supported the republic in the elections of 1920.

The Kapp Putsch

Right wing dissatisfaction with the new government was worsened when the government moved to disband Freikorps units. A nationalist politician, Wofgang Kapp led a revolt in Berlin backed by the Freikorps and the military commander of Berlin. The regular army refused to crush the revolt and the government fled to Stuttgart. Its call for a general strike was carried out by the trade unions in the city and the putsch collapsed. At the same time a communist revolt was crushed in the Ruhr, the industrial heartland of Germany, with over a thousand dead.

Right wing assassinations were to plague the early years of the new republic with leading politicians such as Matthias Erzberger and Walther Rathenau assassinated. Many of the murderers were treated with great leniency by the courts but the murders did have the effect of strengthening support for the institutions of the republic.

The French occupation of the Ruhr

In 1921 the Allied Reparations Commission presented the government with a bill for reparations of £6.6 Billion. The Germans could not pay the amount owed and over the Christmas and New Year, 1922-3, they defaulted on their payments.
Seventy thousand French and Belgian troops occupied the Ruhr. They intended to use the produce of Germany’s industrial heartland as payment in kind for reparations. The German government began a policy of passive resistance and called a general strike. Some began a low level terrorist campaign. The French reacted brutally with aggressive house searches, hostage taking and shooting over a hundred Germans.

The economic effects of the occupation were catastrophic. The loss of production in the Ruhr caused a fall in production elsewhere and unemployment rose from 2% to 23%.Prices rose out of control as tax revenues collapsed and the government financed its activities through the printing of money. By November prices were a billion times their pre-war levels.
The hyper inflation of this period can be seen from the following table:

Year Month Marks needed to buy
one US dollar
1919 April 12
December 47
1921 November 263
1922 July 493
August 1,000
October 3,000
December 7,000
1923 January 17,000
April 24,000
July 353,000
August 4,621,000
September 98,860,000
October 25,260,000,000
November 2,193,600,000,000
December 4,200,000,000,000

The rise in prices hit the middle classes and those on fixed income very hard. Many who had saved money found that their saving were worthless. (back)

2. The Stresemann Era
During the dark days of 1923, Gustav Stresemann was appointed chancellor and his policies would help to transform the fortunes of Weimar. He had been a strong supporter of Germany’s involvement in World War I and advocated unrestricted submarine warfare as the only means to defeat Britain.

At first, Stresemann felt no loyalty to the new Weimar Republic and he opposed the Treaty of Versailles. He set up his own party the German People’s Party (DVP). However his views developed and he advocated a great coalition from the SPD to the DVP to consolidate democracy against the extremes of left and right.

He became Chancellor in August 1923. His government lasted a hundred days until November 1923 but he remained as foreign minister in successive coalitions until his death in October 1929. As Chancellor he took the crucial step of ceasing financial support to the general strike in the Ruhr. He introduced a new and stable currency (the Rentenmark) that ended the hyper-inflation. He also crushed a communist revolt in Saxony and faced down the threat from Hitler in Bavaria.

The Period of Prosperity

Over the next six years, as foreign minister he sought to improve Germany’s international position, cooperate with France and Britain in order to secure a revision of some of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. This policy became known as fulfilment.

He achieved a large measure of success. Under Anglo-American pressure France withdrew from the Ruhr. Stresemann accepted the recommendations of the Dawes committee for a settlement of the reparations issue. A moderate scale of payments was fixed rising from £50 million to £125 million after 5 years and a 2-year moratorium (suspension) on reparation payments was set. A loan of $800 million was raised for Germany, mainly in America. For the next 5 years American loans poured into Germany which greatly improved the economic position.

The Locarno Pact

In 1925 he took the initiative that led to the Locarno Pact. Under this agreement Germany recognised her Western frontiers as final and agreed to use peaceful means to ensure revision of her frontiers in the east. Stresemann was a German nationalist and was not prepared to give up what he saw as legitimate demands for the return of Danzig and the northern half of the Polish Corridor.

In September 1926 Germany joined the League of Nations with a permanent seat on the Council in recognition of her status as a great power.

As part of this policy of co-operation, the first of the three Rhineland zones which had been placed under Allied military occupation by the Treaty of Versailles were evacuated in 1926. In 1927 the Inter-Allied Control Commission to supervise German disarmament was withdrawn.

The Young Plan agreed in 1929 greatly reduced German reparations to a figure of £2 billion and Repayments were to be made over a period of 59 years. Stresemann also won complete allied evacuation of the Rhineland by June 1930 (five years ahead of schedule).

It is hardly surprising that when he died of a stroke in October 1929 at the early age of fifty-one Stresemann’s reputation stood very high. He had also become a focus for hopes of European peace. Hitler is reported to have remarked that in Stresemann’s position “he could not have achieved more”.

Cultural Achievements in Weimar Germany

The Weimar Republic, however weak its economy and its political system, was one of the most fertile grounds for the modern arts and sciences in history. The republic also saw greater sexual freedom and tolerance. Berlin, in particular, became a thriving centre of many new art movements such as expressionism. Its status in the world of the arts resembled the place of New York after 1945.

The Bauhaus school near Weimar, moreover, revolutionized architecture, and the theatres in Berlin and Frankfurt led the way internationally in the types of plays that were performed. Thomas and Heinrich Mann and Bertolt Brecht were world famous writers. Philosophy also flourished.

Great film companies made German cinema one of the most notable in the world (a position it never again achieved). Fritz Lang’s work was regarded as pioneering at the time.

Leading composers of music taught and heard their works first performed in Weimar Germany. Cabaret became very popular and the singer Marlene Dietrich’s became world famous.

In the academic world, the Weimar Republic "inherited" excellent universities and science centres from the Wilhelmine period. Göttingen was the world's most famous centre for physics, and German was the international language in physics and chemistry. Albert Einstein lived and taught in Berlin.

Not everyone was happy with the new cultural freedom in Weimar. To the right, Weimar Culture confirmed the image of a hedonistic, amoral, and degenerate society. The fact that many leading artists associated with the Communist Party (which was fashionable in intellectual circles all over Europe) and the strong representation of Jews in the new artistic movements increased this hostility.

When the Nazis came to power most of the leading figures of Weimar culture had to emigrate. A mass exodus of academics, physicists, film directors, and writers took place and many went to the United States, which inherited Weimar culture. 20 Nobel prize winners left and over 2000 people involved in the arts. (back)

3. The Collapse of Weimar, 1930-1933
The Great Depression and Germany

Stresemann’s death could not have come at a worse time for the young republic. The onset of the Great Depression was to have dramatic effects on Germany

The German economy’s recovery after the inflation of 1923 had been financed by loans from the United States. Many of these short term loans had been used to finance capital projects such as road building. State governments financed their activities with the help of these loans.

German interest rates were high, and capital flowed in. Large firms borrowed money and depended heavily on American loans. German banks took out American loans to invest in German businesses. The German economic recovery was based on shaky foundations.

The Wall Street Crash

The German economy was in decline prior to the Wall Street Crash. There was no growth in German industrial production in 1928-9 and unemployment rose to two and a half million.

On the 24th October, “Black Thursday”, there was panic selling on the New York Stock Exchange reacting to a business crisis in America. Early the following week, “Black Tuesday”, 29th of October, panic selling set in again. 16.4 million shares were sold, a record not surpassed for forty years. Share prices went into freefall. Ten billion dollars was wiped off the value of share prices in one day.

Effects on Germany

As a result American demand for imports collapsed. American banks saw their losses mount and they started calling in their short term loans with which so much of German economy had been financing itself for the past five years.

Firms began to cut back drastically. Industrial production fell quickly and by 1932 it was 40% of its 1929 level. To make matters worse in 1931 a number of Austrian and German banks went out of business. . Unemployment rose from 1.6 million in October 1929 to 6.12 million in February 1932. 33% percent of the workforce were now unemployed.

By 1932 roughly one worker in three was registered as unemployed with rates even higher in industrial areas of Germany. Matters were made worse by the fact that the drastic fall in people’s income caused a collapse in tax revenues. Many soon were not in receipt of unemployment benefits as state governments could not afford to pay it.

It was in this economic chaos that the Nazis and Communists thrived.

Crime and suicide rates rose sharply and many lost hope. People deserted the democratic parties in droves and turned to either the Communists or the Nazis. In the election of 1930, the Nazis made their electoral breakthrough winning 107 deputies while the Communists won 77. Both parties were opposed to the democratic system and used violence against their political opponents. Hitler’s Brownshirts clashed frequently on the streets with their Communist enemies.

Bruning (1930-2)

The new chancellor, the Centre politician Heinrich Bruning, followed a policy of economic austerity where government spending was cut in order to keep inflation under control and keep German exports competitive. He increased taxes, reduced salaries and reduced unemployment assistance.

While it was sound economic thinking at the time, it only worsened the situation. The banking collapse in 1931 made matters even worse. Bruning was so unpopular that when he travelled by train he had to keep the blinds down as when people caught sight of him, they threw rocks! He was nicknamed the “hunger chancellor”.

The end of Parliamentary democracy

Given the unpopularity of Bruning’s policies, he found it very difficult to get a majority in the Reichstag. He relied on Article 48 and the emergency powers of the president to get laws passed. By 1932, parliament was being largely ignored.

Some of the advisors to the President including General Kurt von Schleicher wanted to include the Nazis in government which Bruning opposed. They wanted to bypass the Reichstag completely and bring in a right wing authoritarian government.

Hindenburg lost confidence in Bruning and they quarrelled about land reform. Bruning was replaced as chancellor by the equally unpopular von Papen. His cabinet of barons had absolutely no support and this was shown in the election of July 1932.

The result was a disaster for democracy in Weimar Germany. The Nazis received 37% of the vote and 230 seats while their communist enemies got 89 seats. A majority of Germans had voted for non-democratic parties. Political violence intensified with twelve people killed on the day of the polls.

The election of November 1932 saw a decline in Nazi but they still remained the largest party in the Reichstag. Communist support continued to rise and this worried many industrialists. Von Papen was replaced as chancellor by von Schleicher.
Von Papen immediately began to plot against von Schleicher and met Hitler. They agreed that Hitler would become the chancellor of a government made up mainly of von Papen’s supporters. Hindenburg who disliked Hitler, was persuaded to appoint him chancellor on the 30th of January. The Weimar Republic was dead!

Political Parties in the Reichstag May
1924 Dec.
1924 May
1928 Sep.
1930 July
1932 Nov.
1932 Mar.
1933
Communist Party (KPD) 62 45 54 77 89 100 81
Social Democratic Party (SDP) 100 131 153 143 133 121 120
Catholic Centre Party 81 88 78 87 97 90 93
Nationalist Party (DNVP) 95 103 73 41 37 52 52
Nazi Party (NSDAP) 32 14 12 107 230 196 288
Other Parties (esp. DDP and DVP) 102 112 121 122 22 35 23

Main Weaknesses

Electoral system too democratic. It was too easy for splinter parties to get elected and very difficult to form stable governments. Parties could contest elections that did not accept the democratic system. After 1930 many of the deputies in the Reichstag were ether communist or Nazi and this made parliamentary government became almost impossible.
There were twenty separate coalition governments in the period and this gave the impression of instability. Many believed that democracy was too weak to defend Germany against the communist threat.
It was a republic born out of defeat. Many Germans refused to accept its legitimacy especially monarchists. They blamed it for accepting the hated treaty of Versailles.
Many within important groups in society such as the army, big business, the civil service and the judiciary wished to see a more authoritarian form of government. They admired pre-war Germany and there was little respect for democratic institutions.
The severe economic problems that were faced reduced support especially the hyper-inflation of 1923 and the Great Depression of the 1930s. (back)
Recommended reading:

Michael Burleigh: The Third Reich: A New History.
Richard Evans: The Coming of the Third Reich.

Weimar Germany

This site gives detail about Weimar Germany from an English educational website.

This is an article from the online encyclopaedia about this tragic period of German history.

This site is a good source of primary documents on most aspects of German history including Weimar Germany.

 

____________________
"If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace."



- John Lennon

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 03:33 PM
You post that every 6 months. Maybe someday you'll be right...........

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/1/2012 at 03:38 PM
quote:
You post that every 6 months. Maybe someday you'll be right...........


A broke clock is right twice a day.

 

____________________
Keep on Smiling


 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 12/2/2012 at 12:40 AM
quote:
The CFR owns you. You work for them. Get used to it.

Even Hillary admits the CFR is in control ....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba9wxl1Dmas

Co-Chairman of the Board
Carla A. Hills

Co-Chairman of the Board
Robert E. Rubin

Vice Chairman
Richard E. Salomon

President
Richard N. Haass

Board of Directors
John Abizaid former Commander, CENTCOM
Peter Ackerman founder, International Center on Nonviolent Conflict
Fouad Ajami professor in Middle East Studies, Johns Hopkins
Madeleine K. Albright former Secretary of State
Henry S. Bienen former president, Northwestern University.
Alan Blinder economics professor, Princeton
Mary Boies managing partner, Boies & McInnis
David G. Bradley chairman, Atlantic Media Company
Tom Brokaw former editor, NBC Nightly News
Sylvia Mathews Burwell Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Kenneth M. Duberstein former White House Chief of Staff
Martin Feldstein economics professor, Harvard
Stephen Friedman former chairman, Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board
Ann M. Fudge former CEO, Young & Rubicam
Pamela Gann president, Claremont McKenna College
J. Tomilson Hill vice chairman, The Blackstone Group
Donna Hrinak former U.S. diplomat
Alberto Ibargüen John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
Shirley Jackson president, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Henry R. Kravis co-founder, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.
Jami Miscik former Deputy Director for Intelligence
Joseph S. Nye, Jr. Kennedy School of Government
James W. Owens chairman, Caterpillar Inc.
Peter G. Peterson chairman, Peter G. Peterson Foundation
Colin L. Powell former Secretary of State
Penny Pritzker CEO, Pritzker Realty
David M. Rubenstein co-founder, The Carlyle Group,
George Erik Rupp president, International Rescue Committee
Frederick W. Smith CEO, FedEX
Joan E. Spero former ambassador
Vin Weber CEO, Clark & Weinstock
Christine Todd Whitman former Governor of New Jersey
Fareed Zakaria editor-At-Large, Time

Some of the corporate members follow, most of which are on the Fortune 500 list.
ABC News
Alcoa
American Express
AIG
Bank of America
Bloomberg
Boeing
BP
Chevron
Citigroup
Coca Cola
De Beers
Deutsche Bank
ExxonMobil
FedEx
Ford Motor
General Electric
GlaxoSmithKline
Google
Goldman Sachs
Halliburton
Heinz
Hess
IBM
JP Morgan Chase
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.
Lehman Brothers
Lockheed Martin
MasterCard
McGraw–Hill
McKinsey
Merck
Merrill Lynch
Motorola
Nasdaq
News Corp
Nike
Pepsi
Pfizer
Shell Oil
Sony Corporation of America
Tata Group
Time Warner
Total S.A.
Toyota Motor North America
UBS
United Technologies
United States Chamber of Commerce
U.S. Trust Corporation
Verizon
Visa [5]

Notable current council members
Roger Ailes (Chairman and CEO of Fox News)
Madeleine Albright (64th United States Secretary of State, 20th United States Ambassador to the United Nations under Bill Clinton)
Lamar Alexander (45th Governor of Tennessee, United States Republican Senator, 5th United States Secretary of Education under George H.W. Bush)
Eliot Abrams (international lawyer, former state department official under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush)
Morton I. Abramowitz (diplomat)
John Abizaid (U.S Army General, former head of CENTCOM)
Michael F. Adams (President of University of Georgia)
John B. Anderson (former Republican/Independent congressman from Illinois)
Anthony Clark Arend (international lawyer, and academic)
Fouad Ajami (academic, middle east analyst)
Howard Baker (13th Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate, 12th White House Chief of Staff under Ronald Reagan, husband of Nancy Kassebaum Baker)
James Baker (61st Secretary of State of the United States under Bush-41, and 67th Secretary of the Treasury of the United States under Ronald Reagan, 10th & 16th White House chief of staff to President's Reagan and George H.W. Bush)
Thurbert Baker (former Democratic Party attorney-general of the state of Georgia)
Michael D. Barnes (former United States Democratic congressman from Maryland, and president of the Brady Campaign)
Charlene Barshefsky (former United States Trade Representative)
Reginald Bartholomew (diplomat)
Evan Bayh (former Democratic U.S senator and 46th Governor from Indiana)
Peter Bergen (journalist, national security analyst for CNN)
Joe Biden (47th Vice-President of the United States)
Josh Bolten (22nd White House chief-of-staff under George W. Bush)
Rudy Boschwitz (former Republican United States Senator from Minnesota)
Sandy Berger (19th United States National Security Advisor under President Bill Clinton)
Warren Beatty (actor, film producer, director)
Jeffrey Bewkes (president of Time Warner)
Stephen Biddle (theorist setting U.S. counter-insurgency policy)
Michael R. Bloomberg (108th Mayor of New York City, founder of Bloomberg L.P.)
Bill Bradley (former Democratic senator from New Jersey, NBA hall of fame basketball player)
Ian Bremmer (Eurasia Group founder and president)
Lael Brainard {Under Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs, wife of Kurt M. Campbell}
Bill Brock (50th chairman of the Republican Party, 8th U.S. trade ambassador and 18th United States Secretary of Labor under Ronald Reagan, former Republican United States Senator from Tennessee)
Dan Burton (Republican Party United States congressman from Indiana)
Erin Burnett (journalist, CNN anchor)
George H.W. Bush (41st President of the United States)
Tom Brokaw (NBC journalist)
Howard Berman (Democratic Party United States Congressman from California)
Peter Beinart (academic, columnist)
Richard Branson (founder of Virgin Group)
L. Paul Bremer (diplomat)
Edgar Bronfman, Sr. (a member of the Bronfman dynasty, president of the World Jewish Congress)
Ethan Bronner (deputy foreign editor of The New York Times)
Zbigniew Brzezinski (10th United States National Security Advisor under President Jimmy Carter)
Stephen Gerald Breyer (United States Supreme Court justice)
Jonathan S. Bush (healthcare CEO, son of Jonathan Bush, brother of NBC entertainment reporter Billy Bush)
Sanford Bishop (Democratic Party United States congressman from Georgia)
David Boren (former Democrat U.S. senator from Oklahoma and president of the University of Oklahoma)
Kurt M. Campbell {Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, husband of Lael Brainard}
Jimmy Carter (39th President of the United States)
Frank Carlucci (16th Secretary of Defense and 15th U.S. national security adviser under Ronald Reagan, 13th deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency under Jimmy Carter)
Dick Cheney (46th Vice-President of the United States)
Juju Chang (journalist, reporter for ABC News)
Bill Clinton (42nd President of the United States)
Hillary Rodham Clinton (former first lady of the United States, 67th United States Secretary of State under Barack Obama)
Henry Cisneros (10th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Bill Clinton)
Mario Cuomo (Democratic politician, 52nd Governor of New York)
Michael Crow (president of Arizona State University)
Katie Couric (former CBS and NBC journalist, talk show host)
Stephen F. Cohen (professor of Russian studies at NYU, husband of Katrina vanden Heuvel)
Edward F. Cox (international attorney, chairman of the New York Republican party, son-in-law of Richard Nixon)
William M. Daley (24th White House chief of staff under Obama, 32nd secretary of commerce under Bill Clinton)
Kathryn Wasserman Davis {American philanthropist}
Kenneth Duberstein (13th chief of staff under Ronald Reagan)
Peggy Dulany (fourth child of David Rockefeller)
Joseph Duffey (academic, educator)
Chris Dodd (Former United States Senator from Connecticut)
Thomas R. Donahue {former Secretary-Treasurer of the AFL-CIO}
William H. Donaldson (former chairman of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission)
Michael Dukakis (65th and 67th governor of Massachusetts, 1988 Democratic Party nominee for the Presidency)
Mervyn M. Dymally (former Democratic congressman from California)
James S. Doyle (journalist & activist)
John Edwards (former Democratic U.S. senator from North Carolina, 2004 Democratic Vice-Presidential nominee)
Karl Eikenberry (United States Army General, ambassador to Afghanistan)
Ari Emanuel (head of Endeavor Agency)
Roger W. Ferguson, Jr. (former vice-chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Noah Feldman (academic and author)
Dianne Feinstein (United States Democratic Party Senator from California)
Donald M. Fraser (former Democratic United States congressman from Minnesota)
Bill Frist (Republican politician, former United States Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate)
Mikhail Fridman (Russian oligarch, International Advisory Board member)
Thomas Friedman (columnist for The New York Times)
Martin Feldstein (economist, Harvard professor)
Tom Foley (57th speaker of the United States House of Representatives)
Francis Fukuyama (political scientist, for state department official)
Pamela Gann (President of Claremont McKenna College, former dean of Duke University School of Law).
Robert M. Gates (22nd United States Secretary of Defense under Bush & Obama, 15th Director of Central Intelligence under George H.W. Bush)
Robert P. George (Academic, professor at Princeton University, theologian, philosopher)
David Geffen (president of Universal Music Group)
Leslie Gelb (former journalist for the New York Times)
Dick Gephardt (22nd Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives)
Sam Gejdenson (former Democratic Party United States Congressman from Connecticut)
Alan Greenspan (13th Chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Maurice R. Greenberg (former chairman and CEO of AIG)
Bob Graham (Democratic Party 38th governor of Florida and United States Senator)
Janet G. Mullins Grissom (Republican lobbyist,former state department official)
David Gergen (advisor to Richard Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton, commentator for CNN)
Peter C. Goldmark, Jr. (former CEO of New York Port Authority, president of Rockefeller Foundation, publisher of International Herald Tribune)
Mikhail Gorbachev (former President of the USSR)
Roy M. Goodman (former Republican member of the New York State Senate)
Newt Gingrich (58th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives)
Ruth Bader Ginsburg (United States Supreme Court justice)
Brian Grazer (producer and co-founder of Imagine Entertainment)
Tenzin Gyatso (14th Dalai Lama)
Richard N. Haass (former State Department official)
David A. Harris (director of the American Jewish Committee (AJC))
Lee H. Hamilton (former United States Democratic congressman from Indiana)
Michael Hayden (United States Air Force general, 15th director of the National Security Agency under Bill Clinton, and 20th director of the CIA under George W. Bush)
Gary Hart (former Democratic U.S. Senator from Colorado, Council for a Livable World chairman, advisory board member for the Partnership for a Secure America)
Heather Higgins (women's advocate, chairman of the Independent Women's Forum, president of the Randolph Foundation)
Chris Heinz (heir to the H. J. Heinz Company ketchup fortune)
Carla Anderson Hills (5th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Gerald Ford, 10th United States Trade Representative to George H.W. Bush)
Kim Holmes (foreign policy and defense expert)
Douglas Holtz-Eakin (economist)
Auren Hoffman (investor/entrepreneur)
Warren Hoge (American journalist, formerly of the New York Times)
Malcolm Hoenlein (vice-chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations)
Katrina vanden Heuvel (editor of The Nation, wife of Stephen F. Cohen, daughter of William vanden Heuvell}
William vanden Heuvel (diplomat and international lawyer, father of Katrina vanden Heuvell)
Jimmy Iovine (chairman of Interscope-Geffen-A&M)
Frederick Iseman (businessman, inventor)
Angelina Jolie (actress, UN Goodwill Ambassador)[6]
Vernon Jordan (advisor to President Bill Clinton)
Nancy Johnson (former Republican United States congresswoman from Connecticut)
Woody Johnson (investor, owner of the New York Jets, heir to Johnson & Johnson)
Sheila Johnson (businesswoman, president of the Washington Mystics)
Walter H. Kansteiner, III (American diplomat)
Peter J. Katzenstein (political scientist, academic)
Robert Kagan (cofounded Project for the New American Century)
Nancy Kassebaum (former Republican Senator from Kansas, daughter of Alf Landon, and wife of Howard Baker)
Thomas Kean, Sr. (Republican politician, 48th Governor of New Jersey)
John Kerry (United States Senator of Massachusetts, 2004 Democratic Party nominee for the Presidency)
Vanessa Kerry (doctor of medicine, liberal activist, daughter of John Kerry)
Henry Kissinger (8th National Security Advisor under Richard Nixon and 56th United States Secretary of State under President's Nixon and Ford)
Joe Klein (Time Magazine columnist)
Paul R. Krugman (economist, columnist for the New York Times)
Anil Kumar (businessman, former senior partner at McKinsey)
Charles Krauthammer (columnist for the Washington Post and political commentator at Fox News)
Zalmay Khalilzad (26th ambassador to the United Nations under George W. Bush)
Philip Lader (diplomat, chairman of WPP Group)
Richard W. Lariviere (Scholar, President of the University of Oregon)
Jim Leach (former Republican United States congressman from Iowa, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities under Obama)
John Robert Lewis (Democratic United States congressman from the state of Georgia, famed civil-rights leader)
Jim Lehrer (journalist, former anchor for PBS)
Joe Lieberman (United States Independent Senator from Connecticut)
Lewis Libby (attorney, former chief-of-staff to Vice-President Dick Cheney)
Nigel Lythgoe (television producer)
Fred Malek (businessman, former President of Marriott Hotels and Northwest Airlines)
David Malpass (economist, Republican Party politician)
John McCain (United States Republican Senator from Arizona, 2008 Republican Party nominee for the Presidency)
Bud McFarlane (13th national security advisor to Ronald Reagan)
William Green Miller (United States Ambassador to Ukraine under Bill Clinton)
George J. Mitchell (17th Senate Majority Leader of the United States Senate}
Walter Mondale (42nd Vice-President of the United States)
Robert Mosbacher, Jr. (businessman, son of Robert Mosbacher)
Les Moonves (President and Chief Executive Officer of CBS)
Bill Moyers (former press-secretary to Lyndon Johnson, public commentator for PBS)
David Mulford (former United States Ambassador to India and current Vice-Chairman International of Credit Suisse)
Rupert Murdoch (founder/chairman/CEO of News Corp and Fox News)
Heather Nauert (journalist and anchor for Fox News)
Janet Napolitano (3rd United States Secretary of Homeland Security under Obama, 21st Governor of Arizona)
John D. Negroponte (former United States Deputy Secretary of State and former Director of National Intelligence under George W. Bush)
Joseph Nye (academic)
Sandra Day O'Connor (former United States Supreme Court justice)
Stan O'Neal (former Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Merrill Lynch)
George Pataki (Republican politician, 53rd Governor of New York)
Henry Paulson (74th United States Treasury Secretary under George W. Bush)
Robert Pastor (national security adviser, son-in-law to Robert McNamara)
David Petraeus (United States Army General, former head of CENTCOM, 22nd director of the CIA)
Peter G. Peterson (20th United States Secretary of Commerce under Nixon)
Steve Pieczenik (former state department official, 911 conspiracy theorist)
Kitty Pilgrim (journalist and anchor on CNN)
Richard Pipes (academic, father of founder/director of Middle East Forum Daniel Pipes)
Daniel Pipes (academic, writer, historian, son of Richard Pipes)
Norman Podhoretz (former editor-in-chief of "Commentary", senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, Project for the New American Century (PNAC) signatory)
Steve Poizner (California businessman and Republican politician)
Roman Popadiuk (former United States Ambassador to Ukraine, Executive Director of the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation)
Colin Powell (65th United States Secretary of State under Bush-43, 16th National Security Advisor under Reagan, 12th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under Bush-41)
Tom Petri (Republican United States congressman from Wisconsin)
Priscilla Presley (actress and former chairwoman of the board of Elvis Presley Enterprises)
Charles Prince (former chief executive officer of Citigroup)
Jennifer Raab {President of Hunter College}
Janet Reno (78th United States Attorney General under Clinton)
Condoleezza Rice (66th United States Secretary of State under Bush-43)
Dan Rather (journalist, formerly anchor at CBS)
Charles Rangel (United States Democratic Congressman from New York City)
Alice Rivlin (economist, former U.S. cabinet member)
David Rockefeller, Jr.
John D. Rockefeller, IV (United States Democratic Party Senator of West Virginia, 29th Governor of West Virginia)
Charlie Rose (PBS journalist and The Early Show anchor)
Liz Rosenberg (publicist)
Chuck Robb (64th Governor of Virginia, former Democratic Party U.S. Senator from Virginia, son-in-law of Lyndon B. Johnson)
Edward Regan (former state comptroller of New york)
Robert Rubin (70th Secretary of the Treasury under Bill Clinton)
Haim Saban (founder of Saban Capital Group)
Jeffrey D. Sachs (American economist)
Diane Sawyer (ABC News journalist)
Stephen M. Schwebel (jurist, former judge on the International Court of Justice)
Michael Shifter (academic, president of the Inter-American Dialogue)
Dan Senor (former foreign policy advisor to George W. Bush, former Fox News foreign policy analyst)
Amity Shlaes (Bloomberg News columnist, and historian)
Timothy Shriver (chairman & CEO of the Special Olympics)
David Stern (commissioner of the NBA)
John Spratt (former Democratic United States congressman from South Carolina)
Karenna Gore Schiff (daughter of Al Gore)
Olympia J. Snowe (Republican United States Senator from Maine)
Brent Scowcroft (9th & 17th United States National Security Advisor under Presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush)
George Shultz (60th United States Secretary of State under Reagan, 62nd United States Secretary of the Treasury and 11th United States Secretary of Labor under Richard Nixon}
Frederick W. Smith (CEO and founder of FedEx)
Andrew Ross Sorkin (business journalist for New York Times and CNBC)
Walter B. Slocombe (former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy)
George Soros (currency speculator, investor, businessman)
Lesley Stahl (CBS News journalist)
Donna Shalala (18th United States Secretary of Health and Human Services under Bill Clinton, President of the University of Miami)
Eduard Shevardnadze (2nd President of Georgia)
Eric Shinseki (7th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs under Obama, 34th Chief of Staff of the United States Army under Clinton & Bush)
Adlai Stevenson III (former Democratic United States Senator from Illinois, son of Adlai Stevenson II)
George Stephanopoulos (former White House press-secretary under Bill Clinton, Good Morning America anchor, This Week with George Stephanopoulos host)
Laurence H. Silberman (United States federal judge)
Robert Silvers (editor of New York Review of Books)
Stansfield Turner (United States Navy Admiral, 12th director of the CIA under Jimmy Carter)
Doug Turner (Republican party operative/Politician, public relations operative)
Richard Thornburgh (76th Attorney-General of the United States of America under Reagan & Bush, 76th Governor of Pennsylvania)
John L. Thornton (chairman of Brookings Institution, academic, former president of Goldman Sachs}
Fred Thompson (attorney, actor, radio talk-show host, former Republican United States Senator from Tennessee,)
Shirley Temple (actress, diplomat)
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (Former Democratic Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, member of the Kennedy family)
Tom Vilsack (30th United States Secretary of Agriculture under Obama, 40th Governor of Iowa)
Paul Volcker (12th Chairman of the Federal Reserve)
Rick Warren (American Christian leader, Senior Pastor of the Saddleback Church)
Peter J. Wallison (20th White House Counsel to Ronald Reagan, former lawyer to Nelson Rockefeller)
Barbara Walters (ABC News journalist)
Vin Weber (former United States Republican Congressman from Minnesota)
Steven Weinberg (American physicist)
John C. Whitehead (chairman of the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, former United States Deputy Secretary of State under Ronald Reagan, former Goldman Sachs chairman)
Christine Todd Whitman (50th Governor of New Jersey, 9th administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under George W. Bush)
Shirley Williams, Baroness Williams of Crosby (British member of parliament, International Advisory Board member)
Richard S. Williamson (diplomat, lawyer, former chairman of the Republican Party of Illinois)
Oprah Winfrey (media mogul, actress, founder of Harpo Inc.)
James D. Wolfensohn (former president of the World Bank)
Paul Wolfowitz (10th President of the World Bank, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense under Bush-43)
James Woolsey (16th Director of Central Intelligence under Bill Clinton)
Dov S. Zakheim (academic and Department of Defense official under Reagan and George W. Bush)
Paula Zahn (journalist, former anchor at Fox News and CNN)
James Zogby (academic, political commentator and pollster)
Robert Zoellick (11th President of the World Bank)

[edit] Notable historical members
Kenneth Bacon (American journalist)
Conrad Black (International Advisory Board member)
Tom Braden (former CIA agent and liberal journalist)
George Wildman Ball (American diplomat)
Spruille Braden (American diplomat, businessman)
McGeorge Bundy (National Security advisor for Presidents John F. Kennedy & Lyndon B. Johnson)
William Bundy (Central Intelligence Agency agent, historian)
William F. Buckley, Jr (commentator, publisher, founder of the National Review)
Jonathan Bingham (Democratic congressman from New York, diplomat)
Paul Cravath (lawyer, one of the founders of the Council on Foreign Relations)
Monica Crowley (former Richard Nixon aide, radio host, and columnist)
John Chafee (former Secretary of the Navy, and Republican senator from Rhode Island)
Warren Christopher (former United States Secretary of State)
Thomas E. Dewey (47th governor of New York, former Republican nominee for President in 1944 and 1948)
Michael Raoul Duval (attorney for Richard Nixon & Gerald Ford)
C. Douglas Dillon (57th Secretary of the Treasury of the United States under John F. Kennedy & Lyndon Johnson, under-secretary of state under Dwight D. Eisenhower)
Allen Dulles (former Director of the CIA)
John Foster Dulles (52nd Secretary of State of the United States under Ike Eisenhower)
Lawrence Eagleburger (former United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush)
Jeffrey E. Epstein (financier)[7]
Rowland Evans {journalist}
John Exter {economist}
Gerald Ford (38th President of the United States of America)
Geraldine Ferraro (former Democratic New York congresswoman, first woman on a major party presidential ticket in 1984)
Alexander Haig (United States Army General, 59th Secretary of State of the United States under Ronald Reagan)
Sidney Harman (businessman, owner of Newsweek)
Armand Hammer (businessman, investor)
W. Averell Harriman (48th Governor of New York, diplomat, 11th United States Secretary of Commerce under Harry S Truman)
H. John Heinz III (former Republican United States Senator from Pennsylvania)
Richard Holbrooke {diplomat, investment banker, 22nd United States UN Ambassador}
Herbert Hoover (31st President of the United States)
Henry Hyde (former Republican congressman from Illinois)
Sergei Karaganov (International Advisory Board member)
Irving Kristol (journalist, writer, dubbed "The godfather of neoconservatism, father of Bill Kristol)
Jack Kemp (Hall of Fame quarterback, Republican congressman from New York, 9th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under Bush-41, 1996 Republican Vice-Presidential nominee)
George Kennan (diplomat, historian)
Jeane Kirkpatrick (diplomat, 16th United States Ambassador to the United Nations)
Ivy Lee (founding father of public relations)
Robert A. Lovett (4th Secretary of Defense of the United States under Truman)
Robert Matsui (former Democratic Party congressman from California)
John J. McCloy (lawyer, banker)
Charles Peter McColough (businessman)
George McGovern (former Democratic senator from South Dakota, 1972 Democratic Party nominee for President)
Robert McNamara (8th Secretary of Defense under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 5th President of the World Bank)
Daniel Patrick Moynihan (diplomat, former Democratic Senator from New York)
Edmund Muskie (58th Secretary of State of the United States)
Richard M. Nixon (37th President of the United States)
Paul Nitze (Secretary of the Navy under Lyndon Johnson)
Nelson Rockefeller (41st Vice-President of the United States, and Governor of New York)
John D. Rockefeller 3rd
Felix Rohatyn (investment banker)
Mark B. Rosenberg (President of Florida International University)
Eugene Rostow (former dean of Yale law, legal scholar)
Walt Rostow (7th National Security advisor to Lyndon Johnson)
Dean Rusk (54th Secretary of State of the United States under Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson)
Abraham A. Ribicoff (former Democratic United States Senator from Connecticut)
William V. Roth, Jr. (former Republican United States Senator of Delaware).
Carl Sagan (American scientist)
Arthur Schlesinger (historian, academic)
Raymond P. Shafer (former Republican governor of Pennsylvania)
Tony Snow (former press secretary to George W. Bush, journalist, radio talk-show host)
Ron Silver (actor, director, producer, co-founded One Jerusalem)
Strobe Talbott (diplomat, chairman of Brookings Institution, journalist)
Cyrus Vance (57th Secretary of State of the United States under Jimmy Carter)
Vernon A. Walters (United States Army General, 17th U.S. ambassador of the U.N.)
John Wheeler III (Vietnam veteran, military consultant, presidential aide; found murdered on Dec. 31, 2010)
Paul Warburg (banker)
Caspar Weinberger (15th Secretary of Defense for the United States under Ronald Reagan)
Albert Wohlstetter
Roberta Wohlstetter

[edit] List of Chairmen
Russell Cornell Leffingwell 1946–53
John J. McCloy 1953–70
David Rockefeller 1970–85
Peter G. Peterson 1985–2007
Carla A. Hills (co-chairman) 2007–
Robert E. Rubin (co-chairman) 2007–

[edit] List of presidents
John W. Davis 1921–33
George W. Wickersham 1933–36
Norman H. Davis 1936–44
Russell Cornell Leffingwell 1944–46
Allen Welsh Dulles 1946–50
Henry Merritt Wriston 1951–64
Grayson L. Kirk 1964–71
Bayless Manning 1971–77
Winston Lord 1977–85
John Temple Swing 1985–86 (Pro tempore)
Peter Tarnoff 1986–93
Alton Frye 1993
Leslie Gelb 1993–2003
Richard N. Haass 2003–



Are you married to Gina?

 

____________________


Outside in the cold distance
A wildcat did growl
Two riders were approaching
And the wind began to howl

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13580
(13834 all sites)
Registered: 2/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/2/2012 at 10:57 AM
quote:
quote:

Even Hillary admits the CFR is in control ....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba9wxl1Dmas

Co-Chairman of the Board
Carla A. Hills

Co-Chairman of the Board
Robert E. Rubin

Vice Chairman
Richard E. Salomon

President
Richard N. Haass

Minister of Propoganda and Doomsaying
J.P.B.





quote:
...and all this time I thought my grandchildren owned me...

They do own the most important part of you, piacere...




that's a fact, dear lady. That's a fact.

back on topic...and I tell you honestly, I have no idea what it is, I haven't read much in this thread outside of yours and Sang's posts...

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7168
(7166 all sites)
Registered: 4/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/3/2012 at 01:56 PM

 

____________________
"If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace."



- John Lennon

 
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