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Author: Subject: Article about Betts, by Betts.

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  posted on 6/22/2012 at 04:59 PM
Saw jdorman60 posted a link to this article on another thread, so I thought I would give it a thread of it's on.



All Betts are on
Southern rock great Dickey Betts and son ramble into Marin County Fair

by Greg Cahill


Call it Rock 'n' Roll 101.

Duane Betts had the best home-schooled—make that school of rock—education a red-blooded American kid could hope for, with a front-row seat to the hard-living Allman Brothers, his axe-wielding dad, Dickey Betts, and a cadre of fellow rebel-rockers.

"The earliest memory I have of seeing my dad play live was in the mid-'80s, at a show during a trip to Virginia. I was probably about 7," Duane, 34, recalls during a phone call from his Malibu home. "I later saw my dad's solo band, with (guitarist) Warren Haynes and (drummer) Matt Abts (who went on to form Gov't Mule together). That was probably '87 or '88.

"When the Allman Brothers got back together in 1989, I went out on tour for two to three weeks with them. Basically, I grew up on the road with my dad—if there were shows, I was there."

Duane is back on the road with his father as a guitarist in Dickey Betts & Great Southern. And he's applying the lessons he learned in his youth as well as more than a few other tips from his famous father, a founding member of the Allman Brothers and a legendary axe slinger, songwriter and hell-raiser.

The Dickey Betts band performs June 30 in San Rafael on opening night of the Marin County Fair.

Of course, Betts also is known as the guy whose allegedly excessive drinking got him kicked out of the Allman Brothers, a band notorious for excess.

He was fired via a fax.

Clearly, the elder Betts is wary of the press: When I request an interview, he emails to his publicist that at 69, he's "said everything there is to say."

"Yeah, he doesn't do a lot of interviews these days," Betts' soft-spoken and gracious son says.

But on the summer festival circuit, Dickey Betts lets his trademark Gibson Les Paul Gold Top guitar do the talkin'.

He formed the solo band in 2000, shortly after his highly publicized falling out with keyboardist, vocalist and songwriter Gregg Allman. In Allman's new autobiography, My Cross to Bear, the sole surviving Allman brother has nothing nice to say about Betts.

Yet Betts not only helped to shape the Allman Brothers' signature sound, he helped lay the foundation for Lynyrd Skynyrd, Gov't Mule, the Marshall Tucker Band, the Derek Trucks Band and other Southern-rock bands that embrace dual-guitar leads and the jam-band ethos. In 1969, Betts joined guitarist Duane Allman (his son's namesake), bassist Berry Oakley and drummer Butch Trucks for practice sessions in Jacksonville, Florida. At the time, Gregg Allman was living in Los Angeles and playing with the band Hour Glass. It was Betts who conceived of the double-lead guitar parts, rich in interwoven countermelodies, an innovation that grew from his love of Western swing bands as well as such jazz greats as Miles Davis and John Coltrane.

While Gregg Allman supplied songs soaked in the blues ("Midnight Rider," "Whipping Post" and "Dreams," for instance), Betts wrote such lyrical gems as "Jessica," "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and the Southern-rock classic "Ramblin' Man."

And, of course, there are those soaring instrumental jams.
"Duane (Allman) and Dickey were both just really good players," Duane Betts says, "so they decided to open it up a bit musically.

"They definitely pioneered that sound."

The current Dickey Betts band is built on a hard-driving sound not unlike the Allman Brothers, with three guitarists, a keyboardist/vocalist, bassist and two drummers—and plenty of rebel yell.

"I think his true gift is transmitting his emotion through the guitar, but the instrumentals he has written, especially 'Jessica' and 'In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,' show a real gift that few rock songwriters have matched," Duane Betts says of his father. "The lyrical quality of those songs is really great.

"I've learned a lot from (my father). And when he's 'on,' it's definitely magical. Even when I was younger, and before I had a chance to play in a band with him, there were nights when his playing just sent chills down my spine."

Does Duane Betts feel pressure being named after a musician ranked No. 2 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Rock Guitarists of All-Time (Jimi Hendrix owns the top spot; in 2011, Dickey Betts was ranked No. 61)?

"There's no pressure to live up to the reputation of Duane Allman," he says. "But there's pressure to be the son of someone who's had a successful music career and who's in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. There doesn't have to be, but there just is. Let me put it this way, it's real easy to put unnecessary pressure on yourself. You just deal with that.

"I take the view that you have to honor the tradition," he adds. "I think that if you're going to play that music then you need to do it the right way."

http://pacificsun.com/news/show_story.php?id=4467

 

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We stood together thru thick and thin,yeah we made the best of it all back then.
Then I guess time took it's toll,cut me deep,cut me cold.
Brother against brother....

 
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  posted on 6/22/2012 at 05:39 PM
quote:
Saw jdorman60 posted a link to this article on another thread, so I thought I would give it a thread of it's on.



All Betts are on
Southern rock great Dickey Betts and son ramble into Marin County Fair

by Greg Cahill


Call it Rock 'n' Roll 101.

Duane Betts had the best home-schooled—make that school of rock—education a red-blooded American kid could hope for, with a front-row seat to the hard-living Allman Brothers, his axe-wielding dad, Dickey Betts, and a cadre of fellow rebel-rockers.

"The earliest memory I have of seeing my dad play live was in the mid-'80s, at a show during a trip to Virginia. I was probably about 7," Duane, 34, recalls during a phone call from his Malibu home. "I later saw my dad's solo band, with (guitarist) Warren Haynes and (drummer) Matt Abts (who went on to form Gov't Mule together). That was probably '87 or '88.

"When the Allman Brothers got back together in 1989, I went out on tour for two to three weeks with them. Basically, I grew up on the road with my dad—if there were shows, I was there."

Duane is back on the road with his father as a guitarist in Dickey Betts & Great Southern. And he's applying the lessons he learned in his youth as well as more than a few other tips from his famous father, a founding member of the Allman Brothers and a legendary axe slinger, songwriter and hell-raiser.

The Dickey Betts band performs June 30 in San Rafael on opening night of the Marin County Fair.

Of course, Betts also is known as the guy whose allegedly excessive drinking got him kicked out of the Allman Brothers, a band notorious for excess.

He was fired via a fax.

Clearly, the elder Betts is wary of the press: When I request an interview, he emails to his publicist that at 69, he's "said everything there is to say."

"Yeah, he doesn't do a lot of interviews these days," Betts' soft-spoken and gracious son says.

But on the summer festival circuit, Dickey Betts lets his trademark Gibson Les Paul Gold Top guitar do the talkin'.

He formed the solo band in 2000, shortly after his highly publicized falling out with keyboardist, vocalist and songwriter Gregg Allman. In Allman's new autobiography, My Cross to Bear, the sole surviving Allman brother has nothing nice to say about Betts.

Yet Betts not only helped to shape the Allman Brothers' signature sound, he helped lay the foundation for Lynyrd Skynyrd, Gov't Mule, the Marshall Tucker Band, the Derek Trucks Band and other Southern-rock bands that embrace dual-guitar leads and the jam-band ethos. In 1969, Betts joined guitarist Duane Allman (his son's namesake), bassist Berry Oakley and drummer Butch Trucks for practice sessions in Jacksonville, Florida. At the time, Gregg Allman was living in Los Angeles and playing with the band Hour Glass. It was Betts who conceived of the double-lead guitar parts, rich in interwoven countermelodies, an innovation that grew from his love of Western swing bands as well as such jazz greats as Miles Davis and John Coltrane.

While Gregg Allman supplied songs soaked in the blues ("Midnight Rider," "Whipping Post" and "Dreams," for instance), Betts wrote such lyrical gems as "Jessica," "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and the Southern-rock classic "Ramblin' Man."

And, of course, there are those soaring instrumental jams.
"Duane (Allman) and Dickey were both just really good players," Duane Betts says, "so they decided to open it up a bit musically.

"They definitely pioneered that sound."

The current Dickey Betts band is built on a hard-driving sound not unlike the Allman Brothers, with three guitarists, a keyboardist/vocalist, bassist and two drummers—and plenty of rebel yell.

"I think his true gift is transmitting his emotion through the guitar, but the instrumentals he has written, especially 'Jessica' and 'In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,' show a real gift that few rock songwriters have matched," Duane Betts says of his father. "The lyrical quality of those songs is really great.

"I've learned a lot from (my father). And when he's 'on,' it's definitely magical. Even when I was younger, and before I had a chance to play in a band with him, there were nights when his playing just sent chills down my spine."

Does Duane Betts feel pressure being named after a musician ranked No. 2 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Rock Guitarists of All-Time (Jimi Hendrix owns the top spot; in 2011, Dickey Betts was ranked No. 61)?

"There's no pressure to live up to the reputation of Duane Allman," he says. "But there's pressure to be the son of someone who's had a successful music career and who's in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. There doesn't have to be, but there just is. Let me put it this way, it's real easy to put unnecessary pressure on yourself. You just deal with that.

"I take the view that you have to honor the tradition," he adds. "I think that if you're going to play that music then you need to do it the right way."

http://pacificsun.com/news/show_story.php?id=4467


Great read, but I believe the writer left out Jaimoe???

 

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  posted on 6/23/2012 at 07:13 AM
I would be interested to see if dickey and duane ever write some music together and record it.
 

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  posted on 6/23/2012 at 07:34 AM
Nice story, thanks. I think it's some good appreciation of Dickey........especially in light of Gregg's book, which has "nothing nice to say about Betts". How true!

 

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  posted on 6/23/2012 at 07:46 AM
quote:
Nice story, thanks. I think it's some good appreciation of Dickey........especially in light of Gregg's book, which has "nothing nice to say about Betts". How true!


That's why I didn't buy his book. Gregg forgets about the good times they had together.

 

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  posted on 6/23/2012 at 07:07 PM
We must have read different books?? Gregg did complement Dickey for his contributions in the book, as well as ripping him for the "negative" things he did.

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 09:27 AM
quote:
quote:
Nice story, thanks. I think it's some good appreciation of Dickey........especially in light of Gregg's book, which has "nothing nice to say about Betts". How true!


That's why I didn't buy his book. Gregg forgets about the good times they had together.


No he doesn't forget about the good times, he just doesn't talk much about them. Most people wanted to know about the other things, which is why he put other things in the book. If he had put things about the good times, people would have come down on him calling him a hypocrite,'oh sure, now he writes this stuff, if he loved him so much as a brother, why did he send that fax.....'

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 10:27 AM
quote:

We must have read different books?? Gregg did complement Dickey for his contributions in the book, as well as ripping him for the "negative" things he did.



I can remember TWO positive remarks about Dickey: Dickey probably saving Duane's life after Duane had OD'd. Admittedly, that's a BIG one. The other was the way Dickey "stepped up" during the completion of Eat a Peach after Duane passed. For example, Gregg mentions Dickey learning the slide part to Ain't Wastin' Time No More on the plane ride to a Miami studio. But those are the only two positive things I can think of, and there are TONS of negative remarks about Dickey.

To continue in the Eat a Peach vein: Gregg says Dickey had the riff for Les Brers in A Minor, and the rest of the band filled in the other parts for him. "Filled in the other parts for him?" That remark is NEVER used in terms of a Gregg Allman tune. So just what is Gregg saying? The band was influential in finishing Dickey Betts tunes, but had nothing to do with Gregg's?

More than that, Dickey's other contributions to the music are almost never mentioned. Let me give you an example: Gregg talks about the Enlightened Rogues record, how proud he is of it. He goes into his inspiration for the ONE song he wrote for it. I just picked up ER from amazon last week (I'd never owned it, even on vinyl). There are eight songs on it; Dickey Betts either wrote or co-wrote 6 of the 8 tunes. The other is credited to someone named John Mertis. Dickey's contributions to that record are never mentioned in the book, as if it was largely a Gregg Allman influenced record.

Yeah, Dickey has some issues, we all know it. But in my opinion, Gregg's book is extremely one-sided, and that's the big problem I have with it.



[Edited on 6/24/2012 by robslob]

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 12:13 PM
quote:
There are eight songs on it; Dickey Betts either wrote or co-wrote 6 of the 8 tunes.


And Imho, only two with any creative spark... "Just ain't easy"..& "Pegasus"...1 by Gregg, 1 by Dickey.

The rest of it is pretty damn average reworkings of old themes and ideas. I can remember buying this record and thinking, "wtf"? Does Dan T. even get to play? Then seeing them in concert and thinking, "Could Dickey's amp possibly be any louder"?

"Crazy love" is perhaps the worst ABB tune ever to make it to vinyl.

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 03:32 PM
quote:

And Imho, only two with any creative spark... "Just ain't easy"..& "Pegasus"...1 by Gregg, 1 by Dickey.

The rest of it is pretty damn average reworkings of old themes and ideas. I can remember buying this record and thinking, "wtf"? Does Dan T. even get to play? Then seeing them in concert and thinking, "Could Dickey's amp possibly be any louder"?

"Crazy love" is perhaps the worst ABB tune ever to make it to vinyl.



That's your opinion, but not that of Gregg, who says he's "very proud" of the record. You don't say you're very proud of a record if you think 6 of 8 songs suck. Yet of course he never mentions that Dickey's writing dominates the record. BTW, I think Crazy Love is a great tune, but as always, to each their own.

 

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Don't let the sounds of your own wheels
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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 03:34 PM
quote:

From my point of view Dickey probably deserves more praise than he gets and he probably desreves more negative comments than he gets.



Congratulations, you just won!! First person to say Gregg Allman didn't say enough negative things about Dickey Betts in his memoirs!

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 06:19 PM
quote:
That's your opinion, but not that of Gregg, who says he's "very proud" of the record. You don't say you're very proud of a record if you think 6 of 8 songs suck.


"very proud"...Yet they play how many of these songs ?

You are right about one thing Rob, to each their own

 

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  posted on 6/24/2012 at 08:00 PM
It's not just ER tho -- they play no songs off their other ones either, like WLorD, 7 Turns, WIAB, HTN etc -- and, after the release of each of these, they said how proud they were of it etc etc

 

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  posted on 6/25/2012 at 11:07 AM
I know there are a lot bitterly negative comments from Gregg about Dickey, but here are the positive ones that I could find in "My Cross to Bear" Some are underhanded or were perhaps followed by some negativity, but I think they express some ambivalence or regret on Gregg's part about the way things worked out:

At the beginning - "That would all change - Dickey's playing and my perception of it .... he must have been a good guitar player: he wouldn't have stayed in the band if he hadn't been."

When Dickey was sick, "We played a few gigs without him around the Rye area, because we weren't going back to Macon without him."

Recording in the studio the first time - "My brother must have really liked Dickey, because there weren't too many people that he would take that kind of time with. Dickey finished the record, because he wasn't going to be whipped."

The ABB's musical influences. - "Eventually the jazz thing rubbed off on Dickey - you can hear it in "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed."

When Duane almost overdosed - "I'm getting ready to spring like a damn black panther, and Dickey goes right over the top of me. When that guy needed to run, he could really move. He was over me, through me, and past me, up to the third floor. He loved Duane - I've got to say that about Dickey Betts. I also have to say that he probably saved Duane's life that night. You've got to give the devil his due, but the thing is Dickey ain't no devil. He's just a mixed up guy."

On cutting Melissa for EAP - "...and the finest guitar work I ever heard from Dickey Betts was on that song."

The loss of Duane - "Losing Duane really slammed Dickey too, but he didn't show it. We didn't see too much of Dickey after my brother died. He had this huge garden, and when something would piss him off, he would go out there and sling a hoe or a shovel or an ax for about four hours in the hot sun. He'd come back for dinner, and he'd be okay. The cat really does have a heart, and I really think he cared about my brother - you don't go naming your child after someone that you don't care for. When my brother died, Dickey really stepped up. He woodshedded like crazy. I remember him learning how to play the slide part of "Ain't Wastin Time No More" on the airplane, during the flight down to Miami to finish up Eat a Peach."

Underhanded compliment about getting back together in 1989 - "When the Brothers were on, and if Dickey was having a good night, no one could touch us."

And finally during court proceeding in 2000 - "It's hard to be in a situation like that and not find yourself thinking about the very beginning of it all and how the hell it came to this."









 

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  posted on 6/25/2012 at 06:46 PM
"Dickey ain't no devil. He's just a mixed up guy."

If anybody expects to get more than that out of Gregg regarding Dickey, they are fooling themselves.

Pretty spot on assessment, in my opinion. It's a shame some of the other comments about Dickey in the book are so inflammatory, because I think Gregg nailed it with that one.

 
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  posted on 6/25/2012 at 07:06 PM
quote:
I know there are a lot bitterly negative comments from Gregg about Dickey, but here are the positive ones that I could find in "My Cross to Bear" Some are underhanded or were perhaps followed by some negativity, but I think they express some ambivalence or regret on Gregg's part about the way things worked out:

At the beginning - "That would all change - Dickey's playing and my perception of it .... he must have been a good guitar player: he wouldn't have stayed in the band if he hadn't been."

When Dickey was sick, "We played a few gigs without him around the Rye area, because we weren't going back to Macon without him."

Recording in the studio the first time - "My brother must have really liked Dickey, because there weren't too many people that he would take that kind of time with. Dickey finished the record, because he wasn't going to be whipped."

The ABB's musical influences. - "Eventually the jazz thing rubbed off on Dickey - you can hear it in "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed."

When Duane almost overdosed - "I'm getting ready to spring like a damn black panther, and Dickey goes right over the top of me. When that guy needed to run, he could really move. He was over me, through me, and past me, up to the third floor. He loved Duane - I've got to say that about Dickey Betts. I also have to say that he probably saved Duane's life that night. You've got to give the devil his due, but the thing is Dickey ain't no devil. He's just a mixed up guy."

On cutting Melissa for EAP - "...and the finest guitar work I ever heard from Dickey Betts was on that song."

The loss of Duane - "Losing Duane really slammed Dickey too, but he didn't show it. We didn't see too much of Dickey after my brother died. He had this huge garden, and when something would piss him off, he would go out there and sling a hoe or a shovel or an ax for about four hours in the hot sun. He'd come back for dinner, and he'd be okay. The cat really does have a heart, and I really think he cared about my brother - you don't go naming your child after someone that you don't care for. When my brother died, Dickey really stepped up. He woodshedded like crazy. I remember him learning how to play the slide part of "Ain't Wastin Time No More" on the airplane, during the flight down to Miami to finish up Eat a Peach."

Underhanded compliment about getting back together in 1989 - "When the Brothers were on, and if Dickey was having a good night, no one could touch us."

And finally during court proceeding in 2000 - "It's hard to be in a situation like that and not find yourself thinking about the very beginning of it all and how the hell it came to this."


Thanks Jdorman for condensing that... and I don't know about anyone else , but for me it puts a sorta lump in my throat.. Look, we all have our own lives and successes and failures, children , grandchildren, careers , retirements, love of the music and just living life.. The ABB music played a very big part in my life and so I love this music and when I come here it is like a little escape for me to remember when WE were all young and the music was new.. and then there was THE Brotherhood that I thought they believed in and I think that they did a long time ago when we were living like hippies and did believe in ~one for all and all for one~... I always say to myself , I hope it wasn't just FASHION and there was some truth there..I think the most truth was when Duane was alive . Who knows where or what would've happened had he lived .. anyway..it's nice to come on site here and read something good and real...
Everyone seemed to get caught up in Gregg's negativity about Betts.. For me reading this book didn't enlightened me on to much.. Gregg is the person I always thought he was.. or seems to be.. I had that evaluation of him at 22 yrs old.. nothing seems to have changed except we are older ..
I still love listening to the ABB , I prefer the old days.. however I do have appreciation for the newer version of the ABB..but for me the ABB are with the remaining founding members and the sound and tone that Betts contributed. I am sure at this late date there is no chance of them EVER playing together again... So, I see Dickey Betts and Great Southern every chance I get.. that leaves an extra ticket for the ABB fan of today to see them..

Play it loud.... peace out








 

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