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Peach Master





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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 03:03 PM
I was asked the other day how I got into certain bands. I was told that I seem to listen to a lot of non-mainstream bands. I was asked how I found out about them. Here is what I told them. It was 69 or 70 when I first heard AAB. The guys across the street were listening to them after moving way from the The Beatles and Herman's Hermits. Then as I started high school I picked my own music and most of it came from the $1 cut out bins. The main stream groups did not make the cut out bins so that is where I found a lot of different bands. In high school I attempted to play the guitar so I was drawn to guitar driven bands with AAB as my favorite. The late 60s & early 70s were a strange time where it was not uncommon for 14 and 15 year olds to hang with 18 and 19 year old playing music or just listening to local bands practicing. The older guys showing younger guys like me how to play the guitar. Music was the common bond. So that is how some young people heard about different bands. Woodstock only happened a few years before and the counter culture was still going and almost everyone knew a few real hippies. Hippies almost always ment music. Strange music, music from all over the place. Next thing you know it is over 40 years later and it is today. Most of music collection contains music at least 40 years old. While in high school everyone was into Elton John or Chicago. Not me AAB (Duane AAB) Focus, the Mothers then a major move to Return to Forever. Of course most of my friends goofed on RTF because they did not get it. But my guitar friends got it once they heard Al DiMeolia.
Basically the more mainstream my classmates went the more counter culture I went. I guess while I still listen to AAB at the Filmore some old classmates are still listening to Crockadile Rock......the more things change the more they are the same.

 
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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 03:42 PM
i love the cutout bin. And the dollar record bins. In the late 80's, I was 17/18 and a local store was moving and was selling all their $1 records for 25 cents to clear them out. I probably bought 200 records and discovered amazing music that no one I knew at that time was listening to. There were a fair amount of ABB related records in there. Enlightened Rogues, Win Lose Or Draw, Laid Back. There was Johnny Winter And Live, Second Winter with the blank side 4. Deep Purple albums, a real hodge podge of 70's rock music and it was great.

In the last few years I've been visiting Main Street Juke Box in Stroudsburg, PA. they have great music in the dollar bin. Lots of stuff in excellent condition too because if it doesn't move after a while at regular price they put it in the dollar bin. I've found more than a few $5 to $8 records in there (they leave the old price tags under the new ones). I discovered the Good Rats thanks to the dollar bin. Starcastle, Sweathogs, Fandango, got a bunch of stuff loosely linked to ABB too like Alex Taylor, Talton, Stewart & Sandlin, Larsen/Feiten Band, plus Byrds/Burritos side projects, interesting blues once in a while. If you find 15 records it's only 10 bucks so for that price I'll try stuff that just looks interesting. I like 80's metal so if i see a cheesy looking band from the 80's I've got to hear it and I've found plenty of those in there too. I've also revisited stuff I dismissed in the 80's like Men At Work and The Hooters. Both had some really good albums beyond the hits.

Nowadays I write CD reviews for HTN, American Blues News and Blues Blast so a lot of companies send me blues CDs which is great until I have to review stuff I really don't like lol. Other than that I have satellite radio and once in a while I hear some newer bands I like. I just recently realized I like My Morning Jacket. Sadly though, for rock music I am always looking backwards, which helps the dollar bin stay exciting I suppose.

Around 1989 I bought an album called Social Intercourse by Smashed Gladys based solely on the cover. I never heard of them but it was 3.99 in the cutout bin and it was a great record. I love it to this day. It's a little sophomoric at times, but it rocks hard, like GnR on Appetite or Circus Of Power. I've been buying stuff based on covers ever since and usually it works out pretty well. Once in a while there's a clunker it's worth a shot to find a record that will stick with your for 20+ years.

My original tastes in music were shaped by my mother's records and the records left behind by her siblings at my Grandmother's house. Beatles, Stones, Iron Butterfly, Vanilla Fudge, the Woodstock soundtrack, even stuff like early Neil Diamond before he got too overtly Easy Listening was an influence. as a child i used to listen to In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida and study the Ball album cover with all the butterflies worked into the word Butterfly on the front. Mom had Vida in the "Ball" album jacket - so for years I wondered what the actual cover looked like and what all these songs on Ball sounded like, but I love the Butterfly to this very day. Funny how things happen that way...

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 03:59 PM
I grew up in a very strict house. No loud music was allowed. In fact we didn't have a stereo or a record player. I went to my best buddy's house to listen to his music and one day he was playing LAFE and John Mayall's Turning Point. 40 years later these are still 2 of my favorite albums.

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 04:17 PM
When I was younger the biggest influence I had for the music I listened to was my aunt who is only four years older than me. She would always lend me her albums and turned me on to Mountain, The Who, Santana, Joe Cocker, Janis and on and on. It would piss my mother off big time, she was sure that music would turn me into a full blown drug addict and ruin my life. That didn't happen.

Today, I find a lot of it on Amazon, where I would listen to samples from bands that would be recommended by them based on my previous interests. I've found a lot of good stuff that way. I also discovered some wonderful bands/artists from recommendations on this site.

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 04:20 PM
quote:
I grew up in a very strict house. No loud music was allowed. In fact we didn't have a stereo or a record player. I went to my best buddy's house to listen to his music and one day he was playing LAFE and John Mayall's Turning Point. 40 years later these are still 2 of my favorite albums.



John Mayall's Turning Point is a great album!!

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 05:45 PM
F.M. radio in the 70s was fantastic [wplr 99.1 fm. new haven] got me hooked on ABB, MTB, Zappa, Grateful Dead, Neil Young, Skynyrd and many more "great ones"

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 05:48 PM
I'll be 49 in a few months. My high school years were '77-'81. I was a big classic rock guy. The Beatles, 'Stones, Who, Zep (I loved Jimmy Page), Band, Hendrix, Deep Purple, Etc. Skynyrds plane went down and I delved deeper & deeper into southern rock. Everyone must own the first 3 or 4 discs by the Outlaws, Marshall Tucker, & Skynyrd to go along with a few by Charlie Daniels, Wet Willie, I love scattered tunes by multiple others.

I had a friend who's brother turned me onto some edgier rock BOC, Bloodrock, Toe Fat. Atomic Rooster, Dust, Spooky Tooth, The early Queen is rocking! Some songs or parts thereof are dated, but cool to revisit.

When the late '70's went glam and the early '80's MTV era had music being more about make-up, hair styles, & chicks than it was about the music. Sad occurences. True genuine
heartfelt rock & roll was numbed. I've thought of this era as a R&R stroke, Most that survived were never the same, Only a few exceptions to that theorem are applicable.

I went into a blues search buying up "Nice Price" blues compilations from folks like Alligator & Rounder sampling everyone from Magic Slim to Albert Collins, Elvin Bishop to Etta James, Mississippi Fred McDowell to Mance Lipscomb. Smokey Wilson to Jimmy Reed to U.P. Wilson, Etc... Once I found a sound I went deeper into that artists repetoire.

I love all music guitar, my daughter got me an "I'm Guitarded" T-shirt for Father's Day last year and it fits in a few ways. Electric or acoustic.... Jim Croce & Maury Meuhleison, James Taylor, Leo Kottke, Nick Drake, they all offer my soul some kind of musical bliss.

I still collect all kinds of stuff by all these folks, It keeps the old new, Some are my heroes, some are my friends.

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 06:15 PM
I discovered a ton of great blues from the Alligator 20th Anniversary collection. It was pivotal in my discovery of blues at a time when all I new it from was SRV, Hendrix and Led Zeppelin. I've bought every one since.

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 06:44 PM
I was turned on to The Who at the age of 11. I was hospitalized for 10 days in August 1971 when I was first diagnosised with diabetes. A social worker (can't remember his name) use to come to the children's ward in the evening and take some of us up to the roof garden at N.Y. Hospital to do arts & crafts, play board games, etc. He had an 8-track tape player and a brand new tape called Who's Next. I was hooked the very first time I heard it. Every evening, I would run off the elevator shouting "Play the tape with the guys peeing on the wall please!!!" The rest as they say is history!
 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 08:29 PM
The cut out bin was the best. For$1 you could hear a new band. Not a bad deal even in 1970. Like everyone The album cover was what made me buy the album out of the cut out bin. Hey, I got Atomic Rooster, Kaptain Kopter and Elf for a buck. Back in the 60s and 70s it seemed like there were more bands to choose from at the record store. I think that the record labels signed for bands than today. Where as the bands market themselves on the Internet. Boy I. Iss the cut out bin.......
 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 09:06 PM
I had a neighbor who was 5 years older than me who turned me on to a lot of the good music back in 1971-72. I was 10-11 years old then, and I joined the Columbia House Record Club (or whatever it was called.) One month in 1972, Eat A Peach was rock selection of the month. They sent it to me and I've been a fan ever since. The first five bands I ever loved were Grand Funk Railroad, Alice Cooper, REO Speedwagon (their first record was rockin',) Black Sabbath and The Allman Brothers Band. Honorable mention goes to The James Gang. I had a bunch of their albums by the time I was 12-13 and still have many of them now.

 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 09:39 PM
my old man got me into the Brothers, the Brothers are kind of our family band and will be my favorite band till I die. They are also kind of my gateway band, and lead me into the dead and a constant spiral of discovery. I have basically traveled from the Brothers backwards, all the way to the Delta in the 1920's, and all over the jazz world. plus most of the cats I hang with tend to be into alot cool weird **** . The key is to always keep your ears open
 

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  posted on 4/23/2012 at 09:46 PM
I should also add my dad's record collection in general lead me into alot of weird **** . He had good **** like king crimson, yes, captain beyond, sabbath,billy cobham, weather report etc. But I tend to drift in phases, I'm in a major gospel and soul type mode now.
 

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  posted on 4/24/2012 at 10:22 AM
I had forgotten about the Columbia Record Club....I did get some stuff I wouldn't have ever checked otherwise.

Another way I've exposed myself to different stuff is at festivals like JazzFest and City Stages. You go primarily for one or two acts, but wander around till something catches your ear.

 
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  posted on 4/24/2012 at 10:37 AM
My grandpaw lived across the street from Piedmont Park. One Saturday afternoon while playing in his front yard, I heard music. Followed the trail. A life-changing afternoon, for sure.

 

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  posted on 4/24/2012 at 03:39 PM
quote:
My grandpaw lived across the street from Piedmont Park. One Saturday afternoon while playing in his front yard, I heard music. Followed the trail. A life-changing afternoon, for sure.


Ding!! We have a winner! Rusty that is too cool!!!!

 

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  posted on 4/24/2012 at 05:58 PM
Saw The Beatles were on Ed Sullivan when I was 5. My grandparents went out and bought me Meet the Beatles and I was hooked.
There was soooo much great music around in the late 60s and early 70s - the Beatles, Hendrix, CSNY, the Who. I got into guitar players when I first heard Jimmy Page's solo on Heartbreaker - wow. In 73 I picked up the AFE album after hearing a few friends talk about it as school. That was it for me - the first real improvisational music I listened to. Within a few days I had every note on the album memorized. Duane was my hero; Berry and Dickey weren't far behind. From there, Clapton, the Dead, Marshall Tucker, CDB, Little Feat, and eventually jazz.

 

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  posted on 4/26/2012 at 08:37 AM
I was given ABB-At Fillmore East as a belated b-day gift in 1971. I kinda dug the Batman story record a bit better at the time (I was 6 years old) A few years later at the age of 8, my journey as a musician began with the building of m first "frankenstein" dum kit, a pair of Realistic headphones, and stacks of vinyl kicked down to me by older siblings and their perspective dating partners. By the time jr. high came along, my vinyl collection was large and diverse. I was on my second "frankenstein" kit and playing at keg parties with high school and college musicians. By then, I was gravitating towards UFO and Rush. Yet, my love for Grateful Dead, ABB, Quicksilver, Zeppelin and all thise other "trippy hippy" bands was quite prevalent. In 1979 things changed, I joined a "profesional" band that consisted of guys in their early 20's and played biker bars around Berdoo and Riverside as well as clubs in Hollywood for money. I had to sit at the backdoor or outside when I wasn't playing due to my age. It was at this time that I became part of my own scene. The emerging hard rock scene in So. Calif. It changed into an image conscious pack of B/S by mi decade but by then I was into the heavier/faster music going on up in the Bay Area. You can come to my present home and hear Canned Heat one day and Cannibal Corpse the next. Music is a life thing to me, I can put on something first heard as a pup and get that same $hit eatin grin on my face all these years later. But best of all is having other musicians over to jam....It isn't like it used to be here where my current digs are located, but I still feel like that kid in the canyon beating the dog snot out of that kicked down, piece by peice, frankenstein drum kit. Memories are priceless

 

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  posted on 4/26/2012 at 12:45 PM
There was so much music back then. I had actually heard Derek and the Dominoes Layla before I had even heard of ABB. Everybody was into Clapton. Then I went to High School and was smitten by this guy in Art Class with eyes like the waters in the Carribean. I thought he was philosophical, I later found out (by his own admission) he was just stoned and getting paranoid because I just kept looking at him.

My friend knew this other guy whom I was interested in, she introduced me but I never got more than a “hi, how are you” or “hey, how are ya doin’” in hallway passing. The school was having a picnic with seven bands of students going to perform, so we went to see and support his band, and get a chance to see him in a different setting. He was the drummer. The bass guitarist in his band was very attractive, so we met him and the rest of the band. Musicians being musicians like to talk music and the singer in his band told me “man you gotta get yourself some Allman Brothers music, they are smokin’”. I picked up Fillmore East and that was it.

(as for the kid with the great eyes from art class, he was friends with all these people which is how I ended up getting together with him, when I least expected it and stopped pursuing him – our song was You Don’t Love Me – ultimately he broke my heart, but Duane sustained me and Goin’ Down Slow soothed my soul ).

I turned on everyone I met to Duane, there is no other music that has impacted me as he has, and none ever will. I remember meeting a 20 year old in a club once who had not heard of him, and I told her the same wisdom I was given, “you gotta get yourself some Allman Brothers Band and hear Duane, you just got to”.

 

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