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Author: Subject: You've Never Heard Kiss' 'Alive!'?!, Let It Bleed, Dark Side of the Moon

Zen Peach





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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 10:10 AM
I know nearly nothing about heavy rock and metal music. And even if Kiss isn't exactly metal, it's still much heavier than what I'm used to. From what knowledge base could I possibly write about this band? Up until this point, the closest I'd come to Kiss was singing along to the refrain of Wilco's nostalgic "Heavy Metal Drummer." Well, maybe that's not entirely true I did see Kiss in those Dr. Pepper commercials during the Super Bowl a few years back...

Regardless, the question remained how could I get the full Kiss experience in one album? Considering the band's theatricality, it seemed a good jumping-off point would be a live record. So Alive! was my Kiss record of choice, an early live album that predates the band's forthcoming 2012 release by 37 years (which, in the spirit of full disclosure, is nearly twice my age).

Maybe my exposure to the commercials as my only basis for Kiss are to blame, but as I listened to Alive! the picture in my head pyrotechnic light displays, men in makeup jump-shredding their guitars, and screaming fans drowned out by mile-high speakers took over anything else.

As a result, I found that the music by itself didn't satisfy my expectations. From the distinct sound of a firework cannon at the start of "Deuce," I found myself sitting at my computer itching to type "Kiss live videos" into my search bar. I sensed that by just listening to the live recordings, I wasn't quite getting the full experience.

Unfortunately, this is not a "You've Never Seen" piece, and so I resisted the urge to see Kiss instead of hear Kiss, and instead decided to focus on the music and see what I could learn.

The more I listened, the more I was frustrated by Alive! There were times when a catchy riff would command my attention, but for the majority of the record I felt as though I was trapped unwillingly at a repetitive, never-ending concert. All the songs began to sound alike to me. Even the guitar solos that should be the pinnacle of a song which, I discovered, very predictably begin between 2:15 and 2:30 on nearly every track became interchangeable. If the guitar solos from "Rock Bottom," "Got to Choose," "Firehouse" or "Nothin' to Lose" were placed over the A-D-E chords of "Rock and Roll All Nite," I hardly would have been the wiser. They all sounded similar to me.

Even my initial interest in seeing the live performance dwindled down to annoyance that Kiss' musical output didn't meet the grandeur that its glam get-ups seem to promise. What's more, the lyrics weren't enough to save the music in my eyes. I love lyrics that challenge me, lyrics that push me to a new understanding of what I'm hearing, and lyrics like "She looked good, she looked hotter than hell" or "Oh, it's cold gin time again" just didn't really do that for me.

Now, I know that there are diehard Kiss fans out there quite literally, since you can be buried in a Kiss casket if you so choose and to them I would say that I understand the appeal of the experience that Kiss offers. Their personas, repetitive riffs and sing-along lyrics make for a carefree, mindless musical experience that can be shared by a large group of people, and there's comfort and camaraderie that results from that. I get that part, but I feel that in the case of Kiss, I just missed the boat, and I'm more than fine letting it sail away.

http://www.npr.org/templates/archives/archive.php?thingId=126330958



[Edited on 3/31/2012 by IPowrie]

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 05:54 PM
"Regardless of what you want to say about Kiss, musically....There was no harder working band than Kiss, and there was no band that was more determined to put on a spectacular show and give people their money's worth than Kiss. That was a great thing to see as an opening act. We (Rush) were so impressionable and so green. Kiss were very good to us." - Geddy Lee (Rush opened for Kiss in 1974 and 1975).

"I say this with regret, I never actually saw any of Kiss's live shows. But I loved them. I thought that Kiss really had the right attitude. They never took themselves seriously and they made some f**king good music." - Roger Daltrey, The Who

"I like Kiss. They were so over the top. They took the theatrical stuff a little further than The Who and they wore makeup more than us [laughs]." - John Entwistle, The Who

"Kiss is an interesting band indeed. I like their energy." - Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys

"I thought that Kiss did a great show with the makeup. It's an event, it's a show, people go for a good time." - John Paul Jones, Led Zeppelin

"I think Kiss is absolutely amazing. They're very unique. Kiss reminds me a little of the early Mott the Hoople." - Paul Rodgers, Bad Company

"Kiss were like me, they weren't a super-gifted musician like John Lennon. They worked hard to come up with their hooks and they deserve all the success they got. I totally respect them. They're the best at what they do, history has proven that." - Bob Seger

"Kiss is one of the most exciting and entertaining rock bands of the last 30 years." -Johnny Ramone

"Ace Frehley is a great guitar player." - Lenny Kravitz

"To me, they were the perfect American band because they took what was best about British music and Americanized it." - Noddy Holder, Slade

"We were pretty much awed by the whole Kiss experience." - Buck Dharma, Blue Oyster Cult

"'Destroyer' had some great stuff on it." - Paul Westerberg, The Replacements

"I like Kiss a lot. Queen were often compared to Kiss at the time. We were sort of counterparts. They were the American version and we were the British version. I have a great regard for Kiss 'cause it's all-out. They had their vision, they had their dream and they damn well went for it." - Brian May, Queen

"Gene Simmons came and saw us play at the Whisky in L.A. I remember that he got us on some of their bigger dates so that was real good for us." - Angus Young, AC/DC

"They were the Cirque du Soleil of rock [laughs]. I applauded them for that." - Peter Frampton

"Kiss's very visual kind of thing was good. I thought their image was fun. You gotta run the whole gamut. You can't just be too academic about music." - Ian Gillan, Deep Purple

"Kiss had total savvy as far as publicity and, image-wise, they had it going on. I think it was a brilliant stroke to become cartoons." Ann Wilson, Heart

"Kiss were way ahead of the game as far as being too loud, too fast, too over-the-top. They were right there. They did it all. Kiss loved that we mentioned them in our song, "Surrender." - Rick Nielsen, Cheap Trick.

"One of the first records I ever bought in America was Kiss Alive! I listened to that nonstop way back then." - Julian Lennon

"Kiss were like the Rocky Horror Picture Show come to life." - Dave Davies, The Kinks

"Musically, they're just a terrific rock 'n roll band." - Steven Van Zandt



[Edited on 3/31/2012 by woodsdweller]

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:36 PM
Note: This is a recurring series in which we ask our unimaginably young interns to review classic albums they've never heard before. Shannon Carlin is the latest summer intern for All Songs Considered; to our surprise, she'd never heard Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety.

The minute I hear that cash register "ka-ching" in the beginning of "Money," I immediately change the song. I don't even need to think about it; it's automatic.

Over the years, I've willingly read about Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and all of his craziness, which to me has always seemed more interesting than anything I've heard from the band. But truthfully, I've only heard the handful of songs that play on classic-rock stations ("Money," "Wish You Were Here," "Another Brick in the Wall"), all of which have usually been edited down to fit a three-minute radio spot.

Dark Side of the Moon seems more like something you have to listen to in its entirety, looking to have some sort of "experience" with it or to make a connection not only with the artist who made the album, but with other listeners who enjoy it. I've never really had that with a record or felt the need for it. By the time I was past my boy-band phase in the mid-'90s, the idea of the album was somewhere between waning and obsolete. I and others my age were all about buying singles from Sam Goody's by bands no one would ever hear from again, like the Danish duo S.O.A.P. Remember them? Today, I think the average music listener around my age would rather buy the hits off of iTunes than invest in a whole album.

I admittedly had preconceived notions that Pink Floyd was just a psychedelic jam band whose songs drag on too long songs that (I thought) say little and are in need of editing. As I listened to the opening cut, "Speak to Me," I kept checking to make sure my headphones were working. But once the subtle shrieks of "Breathe in the Air" and the whirling propellers of "On the Run" kicked in, I stopped caring about what track number I was on and started to get carried away. What I heard was an honest portrayal of life and death something much more sincere and inspired than I expected.

"Time" is a sad and soulful take on growing old, whereas "Us and Them" seems to be about the idea of having nothing at all. The songs are honest and universal. By the end of Dark Side, there's this sense of hope. Of course it's completely false, since everyone knows that "there is no dark side of the moon matter of fact, it's all dark," but somehow, it still feels comforting. I'm not surprised that people of every generation have felt a kinship with the band. But when I'm feeling down or confused, I tend to go to introspective singer-songwriters who take a more bare-bones approach. The Bob Dylans. The Conor Obersts.

On their own, the songs on Dark Side just don't grab me. I listened to the whole thing about 15 times and understand why it was (and still is) considered an epic sonic journey. But I'm not jumping on the Pink Floyd bandwagon just yet.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:40 PM
Kiss IS about crunchy, catchy riffs. It would be worth giving "Alive" a few more spins; there are some gems there. I have heard people say, "All their songs sound the same" about so many bands that I love, including the ABB (LAFE was what got that response - "Let me guess, another long guitar solo" from a girl I was with), and my response is always, "Give it another listen."

Most of what you wrote could apply to a Stones or AC/DC album too, Or most blues albums. Or for that matter, James Brown or Little Richard. It's only rock'n'roll - but I like it.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:44 PM
quote:
"Regardless of what you want to say about Kiss, musically....There was no harder working band than Kiss, and there was no band that was more determined to put on a spectacular show and give people their money's worth than Kiss. That was a great thing to see as an opening act. We (Rush) were so impressionable and so green. Kiss were very good to us." - Geddy Lee (Rush opened for Kiss in 1974 and 1975).

"I say this with regret, I never actually saw any of Kiss's live shows. But I loved them. I thought that Kiss really had the right attitude. They never took themselves seriously and they made some f**king good music." - Roger Daltrey, The Who

"I like Kiss. They were so over the top. They took the theatrical stuff a little further than The Who and they wore makeup more than us [laughs]." - John Entwistle, The Who

"Kiss is an interesting band indeed. I like their energy." - Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys

"I thought that Kiss did a great show with the makeup. It's an event, it's a show, people go for a good time." - John Paul Jones, Led Zeppelin

"I think Kiss is absolutely amazing. They're very unique. Kiss reminds me a little of the early Mott the Hoople." - Paul Rodgers, Bad Company

"Kiss were like me, they weren't a super-gifted musician like John Lennon. They worked hard to come up with their hooks and they deserve all the success they got. I totally respect them. They're the best at what they do, history has proven that." - Bob Seger

"Kiss is one of the most exciting and entertaining rock bands of the last 30 years." -Johnny Ramone

"Ace Frehley is a great guitar player." - Lenny Kravitz

"To me, they were the perfect American band because they took what was best about British music and Americanized it." - Noddy Holder, Slade

"We were pretty much awed by the whole Kiss experience." - Buck Dharma, Blue Oyster Cult

"'Destroyer' had some great stuff on it." - Paul Westerberg, The Replacements

"I like Kiss a lot. Queen were often compared to Kiss at the time. We were sort of counterparts. They were the American version and we were the British version. I have a great regard for Kiss 'cause it's all-out. They had their vision, they had their dream and they damn well went for it." - Brian May, Queen

"Gene Simmons came and saw us play at the Whisky in L.A. I remember that he got us on some of their bigger dates so that was real good for us." - Angus Young, AC/DC

"They were the Cirque du Soleil of rock [laughs]. I applauded them for that." - Peter Frampton

"Kiss's very visual kind of thing was good. I thought their image was fun. You gotta run the whole gamut. You can't just be too academic about music." - Ian Gillan, Deep Purple

"Kiss had total savvy as far as publicity and, image-wise, they had it going on. I think it was a brilliant stroke to become cartoons." Ann Wilson, Heart

"Kiss were way ahead of the game as far as being too loud, too fast, too over-the-top. They were right there. They did it all. Kiss loved that we mentioned them in our song, "Surrender." - Rick Nielsen, Cheap Trick.

"One of the first records I ever bought in America was Kiss Alive! I listened to that nonstop way back then." - Julian Lennon

"Kiss were like the Rocky Horror Picture Show come to life." - Dave Davies, The Kinks

"Musically, they're just a terrific rock 'n roll band." - Steven Van Zandt



[Edited on 3/31/2012 by woodsdweller]



I still own the debut and still enjoy playing it.

Strutter, Nothin To Lose, Cold Gin , Fire House, Black Diamond. These are all killer hard rock songs that still hold up just fine IMO.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:44 PM
The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? Growing up in my household, this was never even a question. Practically bottle-fed on the Fab Four, I had Revolver spinning non-stop in my Walkman and was crushing on John Lennon circa A Hard Day's Night by my 7th birthday. There was never much room left in my pint-sized, Liverpool-loving heart for the Stones.

My older brother, having branched out into the wider world of '60s rock, once passed along a copy of Forty Licks, but it just sat accumulating digital dust in my iTunes library. Recently unearthed by the wonders of shuffle, the opening strains of "Gimme Shelter" trembled into my headphones, and before the song could finish, I knew I needed to hear the rest of Let It Bleed. The riff creeps anxiously, tension rising as it accumulates rhythmic scratches and hauntingly wordless vocals, before breaking into desperate rock. Just as Merry Clayton's frenzied, hair-raising shrieks of "Rape, murder / it's just a shot away" die down, they're replaced by the urgently hopeful mantra that love is just a kiss away that this dread can be outrun somehow.


It's jittery: the sort of song that feels restless, like it's tensed up and waiting to go somewhere. And I was waiting to go with it. As soon as I could get my hands on Let It Bleed, I pressed play and finally sat back to hear the Stones start running, from one track to another, seeking shelter anywhere they can find it. Mick Jagger rummages around for hideouts with boozy breath, flying fists and raging hormones against a gritty backdrop of Keith Richards' bluesy, slurred guitars. But even as the Stones strut their way from shelter to shelter, they often find themselves with nowhere to go drinking away heartbreak on some street corner in "Country Honk," or alone and vulnerable in "Love in Vain" and "You Got the Silver."

But what struck me, as I listened to the drawled innuendos of the title track, is I could hear Let It Bleed's potential to be a quaintly subversive album, tamed by the 43 years that have passed since its release. We're decades removed from the cultural upheaval of the '60s; our shock receptors have been blunted by the sheer number of artists who aim to provoke. Nowadays, Hannah Montana donning a scanty bird costume might ruffle a few feathers in a slow news cycle, but the outrage always seems like performance. I'm not sure anything really riles us up anymore.

Yet, to me, Let It Bleed doesn't sound neutered by today's standards. It's rebellious, and it's grimy. Bill Wyman's bass creeps up from the gutter in "Monkey Man," dragging the rest of the song with it, rising defiantly with primal groans and squawks. "Midnight Rambler" slinks around the darkest corner of a back alley. Shivers run up your spine as Mick Jagger prowls just behind you, murmuring and hushing his band to keep from being given away. All at once, the Stones pounce. In the assault of dirty guitar licks, wailing harmonica and Charlie Watts' crashing cymbals, Jagger announces that he'll stick his knife right down your throat, and it's hard not to believe him.

Just as Let It Bleed seems ready to tear at the seams, bursting with tension, anxiety and transiency, its end arrives. The choir lifts up "You Can't Always Get What You Want," letting it float above the fray where the rest of the album exists as Mick Jagger philosophizes. Shelter may be nowhere to be found no love, no peace, no security but you can survive if you keep running, and that's all you need.

In a way, I'm glad it took me so long to discover this album. I'm grateful to my parents for infecting me with Beatlemania so early on, but it's taken me a while to divorce my childhood memories of the Beatles catalog from more discerning listens. Even then, there's only so far "Hello, Goodbye" can come from being my favorite call-and-response nursery rhyme to sing during bath time. If I'd heard Let It Bleed at the same time, I might be similarly distracted by my innocuous memories of it, and have missed out on what I really fell for on first listen: its breadth. It's an album that's as gentle as it is unsettling. At moments, it's stunning haunting, even but it snaps without warning. And even as it closes in on me, leering, and ready to batter my eardrums, I'm still compelled to draw near to it, too.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:44 PM
LOL! That response to Pink Floyd was even scarier. A curious mix of hipster douchebag bravado, short-term attention span, and something that apparently came close to being a frighteningly real experience with music.

People who don't "invest in a whole album" - wow, a new low in shallowness.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:46 PM
Kiss was about Lunch Boxes and action figures.

The music was secondary to the marketing

And it sucks.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:53 PM
quote:
LOL! That response to Pink Floyd was even scarier. A curious mix of hipster douchebag bravado, short-term attention span, and something that apparently came close to being a frighteningly real experience with music.

People who don't "invest in a whole album" - wow, a new low in shallowness.


I feel like there are people like that from every generations. I mean singles have always been popular. I feel like the people who post on this site are in the minority with how we enjoy music. Neither group is wrong

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 06:57 PM
quote:
Kiss was about Lunch Boxes and action figures.

The music was secondary to the marketing

And it sucks.




except KISS was around about 3 years and had 3 studio albums before they ever had an action figure or lunchbox so the music was not always secondary.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 07:09 PM
IPowrie, I'm just knocked out by anyone who feels that spending the time to listen to a whole album is, like, a real COMMITMENT, man! It's like those books people read - they're so, like, LONG and stuff! I just like TV shows - but not those hour long ones! I can't do more than half hour of one show!

As for Kiss, Kiss Alive became a mega-seller when there were no music videos, when you could almost never SEE rock'n'roll on TV, so while the visual aspect was of course very important with that band, that album sold millions of copies to people who never saw them live. It was the music.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 07:50 PM
You've Never Heard Kiss' 'Alive!'?!, Let It Bleed, Dark Side of the Moon

Well, I've heard, Let It Bleed & Dark Side of the Moon.....

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 08:56 PM
I'm confused you respect Kiss more then Pink Floyd???

How do you even compare the two?

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 09:12 PM
37 years later... still love em!

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 09:55 PM
I don't own a single Kiss album, I teased my little brother mercilessly about them when he was young and into them.

He & I went to the first year of the Farewell Tour and we had a great time.

"Kiss were like the Rocky Horror Picture Show come to life." - Dave Davies, The Kinks

Probably the best way to sum up Kiss, although Ann Wilson's comment about becoming cartoons was probably as accurate.

They understood marketing and merchandising better than anyone.

Musicianship, not so much.

 

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  posted on 3/31/2012 at 11:38 PM
quote:
I'm confused you respect Kiss more then Pink Floyd???

How do you even compare the two?


I didnt write any of these articles, just sharing them. Personally I think DSOTM is a masterpiece that when songs are played not in order I can go a while without hearing. KISS I never cared for them as they were always a pop culture reference and to me seemed like a money grab. They worked hard to get what they have but when image is more important than the music I just dont care

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 08:46 AM
Gene $immon$ is a master businessman but I doubt you'll ever see him on a list of the 100 best bass players of all time.

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 09:07 AM
quote:
I've heard Kiss Alive II, but it's been about 34 years or so. I remember the album cover quite a bit more than the music. Kiss were huge in my elementary school back in the late '70's. Relatively speaking. I sort of went in the AC/DC and Ozzy direction shortly after that...followed by Iron Maiden and Judas Priest...before discovering Pink Floyd's DSOTM album, which I walked five miles through a blizzard to a record store to purchase. True story.
Uphill ...... Both ways .

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 12:04 PM
Kiss Alive was my very first rock and roll album when I was in the 5th grade. Loved it then and love it now and still give it a spin from time to time!

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 02:08 PM
quote:
I know nearly nothing about heavy rock and metal music. And even if Kiss isn't exactly metal, it's still much heavier than what I'm used to. From what knowledge base could I possibly write about this band? Up until this point, the closest I'd come to Kiss was singing along to the refrain of Wilco's nostalgic "Heavy Metal Drummer." Well, maybe that's not entirely true I did see Kiss in those Dr. Pepper commercials during the Super Bowl a few years back...

Regardless, the question remained how could I get the full Kiss experience in one album? Considering the band's theatricality, it seemed a good jumping-off point would be a live record. So Alive! was my Kiss record of choice, an early live album that predates the band's forthcoming 2012 release by 37 years (which, in the spirit of full disclosure, is nearly twice my age).

Maybe my exposure to the commercials as my only basis for Kiss are to blame, but as I listened to Alive! the picture in my head pyrotechnic light displays, men in makeup jump-shredding their guitars, and screaming fans drowned out by mile-high speakers took over anything else.

As a result, I found that the music by itself didn't satisfy my expectations. From the distinct sound of a firework cannon at the start of "Deuce," I found myself sitting at my computer itching to type "Kiss live videos" into my search bar. I sensed that by just listening to the live recordings, I wasn't quite getting the full experience.

Unfortunately, this is not a "You've Never Seen" piece, and so I resisted the urge to see Kiss instead of hear Kiss, and instead decided to focus on the music and see what I could learn.

The more I listened, the more I was frustrated by Alive! There were times when a catchy riff would command my attention, but for the majority of the record I felt as though I was trapped unwillingly at a repetitive, never-ending concert. All the songs began to sound alike to me. Even the guitar solos that should be the pinnacle of a song which, I discovered, very predictably begin between 2:15 and 2:30 on nearly every track became interchangeable. If the guitar solos from "Rock Bottom," "Got to Choose," "Firehouse" or "Nothin' to Lose" were placed over the A-D-E chords of "Rock and Roll All Nite," I hardly would have been the wiser. They all sounded similar to me.

Even my initial interest in seeing the live performance dwindled down to annoyance that Kiss' musical output didn't meet the grandeur that its glam get-ups seem to promise. What's more, the lyrics weren't enough to save the music in my eyes. I love lyrics that challenge me, lyrics that push me to a new understanding of what I'm hearing, and lyrics like "She looked good, she looked hotter than hell" or "Oh, it's cold gin time again" just didn't really do that for me.

Now, I know that there are diehard Kiss fans out there quite literally, since you can be buried in a Kiss casket if you so choose and to them I would say that I understand the appeal of the experience that Kiss offers. Their personas, repetitive riffs and sing-along lyrics make for a carefree, mindless musical experience that can be shared by a large group of people, and there's comfort and camaraderie that results from that. I get that part, but I feel that in the case of Kiss, I just missed the boat, and I'm more than fine letting it sail away.

http://www.npr.org/templates/archives/archive.php?thingId=126330958



[Edited on 3/31/2012 by IPowrie]


Kiss is fun but not musically great. You can't capture the enjoyment of their show on an album. I actually think they have some good songs. Try Alive II which I think has good material from their next three studio albums. Kiss was the first concert I ever saw in December 1978 at MSG. My Dad took me for my birthday.

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 02:13 PM
quote:
Kiss Alive was my very first rock and roll album when I was in the 5th grade. Loved it then and love it now and still give it a spin from time to time!


It's in rotation on my MP3 player. "GET UP! And Get Your Grandma Outa Here!"

 

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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 04:52 PM
I quit reading the first time when the author said, I am not familar with this style of music. Then when I read the article in full later on, the opinion of it all sounding the same and being interchangable was pretty much a given. IMHO, this can apply to any type of music, especially if the listener isn't familar with the songs, bands, or style.

I could go to a festival in Europe and see 20 something bands play. It would be nothin for me to distinguish bands and songs, as well as see variances in what they were doing aside from it just being loud.
I could grab a random concert goer from said festival and take them to an ABB or TDB or Phil and Friends show and they would more than likely hold the same point of view as the author of the original post.

I don't get the youthful trend of song over album ? My kids used to trip when they'd sit on my lap in my den and I read to them. Then have to get up so I could turn the record over. When they were older, we'd compromise while playing videogames together. I'd put on a cd and turn the TV volume all the way down. They said it was easier to blow stuff up and drive faster to Megadeth and Hirax than to ABB or The Dead.

I know lots of people say KISS sucks. With that opinion, I'd say they havn't listened to very much cause when you think a band sucks, well you don't listen to their music. At least that is how I am. Good music doesn't always mean being technical or virtuoso, a good song is a good song. KISS has written catchy hook laden tunes and anybody who enjoys the Beatles can see their influence written all over KISS' sleeve.

I dig alot of bands that most who post here would laugh about or go "What-the-fuk-is-that crap" and it certainly doesn't hurt my feeling when somebody says that a band I enjoy "sucks".

To the guy who says KISS is all about the lunch boxes...They toured their butts off and released 5 studio albums and one "live album between Feb 1974 and Nov 1976. 33 months total....with all that output and no KISS dolls or liunchboxes marketed to that point. Regardless of musicalnship or opinions of songwriting skills. That is a pretty impressive "SPURT" of creativity

 

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World Class Peach



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  posted on 4/1/2012 at 07:34 PM
Saw KISS in Macon in 1976....Uriah Heep opened.....

Enjoyed the concert so much I felt I owed them more money; yeah, I was a snot nosed kid in those days.

 

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  posted on 4/2/2012 at 10:19 AM
quote:
quote:
Kiss was about Lunch Boxes and action figures.

The music was secondary to the marketing

And it sucks.




except KISS was around about 3 years and had 3 studio albums before they ever had an action figure or lunchbox so the music was not always secondary.


before the lunch boxes it was just a circus act with fire breathing knuckleheads.

the music sucked

The Idea of combining Rock with circus elements was not a bad idea in itself.
(really taking Bowie's idea of combining theater and rock a step further)

they just did not have the music to back it up.



[Edited on 4/2/2012 by spacemonkey]

 

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  posted on 4/2/2012 at 10:22 AM
Grew up on Kiss. Had the lunch box and figures in the 70's. The Kiss halloween customs and plastic guitar. Good times. Have every vinyl release until they took the makeup off. Always will have a good place for them .

Marketing geniuses and always put on one hell of a rock show.

[Edited on 4/2/2012 by nypeachhead]

 
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