Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Spanish Key Is Awesome! :)

Universal Peach





Posts: 6612
(6612 all sites)
Registered: 11/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2011 at 07:03 PM
Since the ABB busted out Miles Davis' "Spanish Key" on Opening Night at the Beacon, I've been listening to Bitches Brew and Miles' live set from Isle of Wight to refresh my memory on this classic tune. What a great tune! It's basically just a groove and a central riff, but it's a great groove and a great riff, so I have no problem with that whatsoever

This has always one of my favorite tunes, the kind of song I would have hoped to see the ABB play live, but I never even got my hopes up that it was possible. I was glad to hear the ABB play "In A Silent Way/It's About That Time" at the Beacon back in 2009, and I thought that was all the Miles Davis I'd ever be likely to get from the ABB.

Well, I'm glad I was wrong, and I can't wait to hear the ABB spin on this jazz classic, especially the version from 3/14 with the excellent Bill Evans on saxophone. Sounds good to me!

 
E-Mail User
Replies:

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4943
(4942 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2011 at 07:28 PM
imagine if Miles ever played with Duane, the Dead, or Jimi.
I guess this is the closest we'll get.
can't wait to check this out

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 24883
(25865 all sites)
Registered: 5/5/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 04:42 AM
I love Spanish Key!!!

 

____________________




 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6128
(6127 all sites)
Registered: 8/11/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 08:59 AM
quote:
imagine if Miles ever played with Duane, the Dead, or Jimi.
I guess this is the closest we'll get.
can't wait to check this out


I seem to recall watching a great biography of Miles on the Ovation channel sometime ago in which Miles' appreciation of Jimi was mentioned. I'm not sure, but I believe they did participate in a jam session or two. I believe that admiration was very much a mutual thing as well.

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 562
(562 all sites)
Registered: 7/6/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 09:07 AM
youtube video anywhere? have not been able to find anything...
 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 10048
(11188 all sites)
Registered: 1/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 09:48 AM
quote:
Since the ABB busted out Miles Davis' "Spanish Key" on Opening Night at the Beacon, I've been listening to Bitches Brew and Miles' live set from Isle of Wight to refresh my memory on this classic tune. What a great tune! It's basically just a groove and a central riff, but it's a great groove and a great riff, so I have no problem with that whatsoever

This has always one of my favorite tunes, the kind of song I would have hoped to see the ABB play live, but I never even got my hopes up that it was possible. I was glad to hear the ABB play "In A Silent Way/It's About That Time" at the Beacon back in 2009, and I thought that was all the Miles Davis I'd ever be likely to get from the ABB.

Well, I'm glad I was wrong, and I can't wait to hear the ABB spin on this jazz classic, especially the version from 3/14 with the excellent Bill Evans on saxophone. Sounds good to me!


Same here!

Cool post -- I love the ABB

 

____________________
"I know y'all came to hear our songs, we like to play 'em for you but without Gregg here it's really hard for us to do. He sings & plays so much & does such a good job. He's really sick, 103* He might've come, but no one would let him." Duane

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9082
(9082 all sites)
Registered: 2/25/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 10:07 AM
I heard jblizza hates it.
 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1574
(1574 all sites)
Registered: 11/30/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 10:08 AM
Rob, the 3/14 version was amazing. This is the kind of stuff I live for when seeing live music, and I can honestly say this was the best I ever heard the band. Completely in the moment, daring and adventurous, to turn on a dime and make it meaningful. I think we've all known that this band is capable of it, we hear it in the instrumentals, especially the newer ones and certainly from Derek and Oteil over the years. I've heard Warren play Afro Blue and other things with his bands, but on 3/14 I heard him step out more than ever before, while still creating the classic Warren sound. Bill Evans provided the inspiration to dig deeper. Dreams was amazing also, so untypical, neither Warren or Derek really built to the big crescendo at the end, the dynamics were amazing, it was a journey up, down, in and out. It was playful, they worked as an ensemble that just complimented each other. Even though Gregg wasn't out there for Spanish Key on Monday, he could easily fit in, throwing in some Joe Zawinul ideas.
 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9082
(9082 all sites)
Registered: 2/25/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 11:25 AM
quote:
Dreams was amazing also, so untypical, neither Warren or Derek really built to the big crescendo at the end, the dynamics were amazing, it was a journey up, down, in and out.


I watched on MSG on 3/14. You are dead on. The Dreams was out of sight, although I think Gregg may have come in a little early on the lyrics out of the jam. Warren sort of laughed with Derek about it. I thought Bill Evans head was going to pop off he was blowing that horn so insanely. I can't wait to go tomorrow night.

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6128
(6127 all sites)
Registered: 8/11/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 01:47 PM
This may not be the best thread for this question, and I apologize for raising it once again, but isn't it time once again for DVD release of the Beacon run? Especially given the shorter touring schedule this year? I may be wrong, but a pro shot video isn't that cost prohibitive and sure seems like a win-win to me. Thoughts? Am I crazy? Is this a stupid idea?

[Edited on 3/16/2011 by Chain]

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9082
(9082 all sites)
Registered: 2/25/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 03:06 PM
quote:
Thoughts? Am I crazy? Is this a stupid idea?



I have lots of thoughts.

You are crazy.

No, its not a stupid idea.

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3135
(3188 all sites)
Registered: 7/9/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 03:14 PM
I had to watch it a couple of times because the 1st time I did not care for it ..but it is really starting to grow on me now.
 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1907
(1909 all sites)
Registered: 3/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 03:35 PM
You know, I have to say, on paper I was only mildly excited, because I just thought it would be a looser "tease" type situation. Or it was something someone was calling "Spanish Key" and it was just a similar jam. But I was wrong...

This song set up an intensity I think for the whole run. Going into "Sailin' 'Cross the Devil's Sea" with the same heaviness of the 90's live versions just really sent the whole run off on a powerful note.

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 10333
(10334 all sites)
Registered: 12/22/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 04:34 PM
I saw it live Monday, and kept waiting for the song to start... then they rolled into Soulshine and I was happy.

 

____________________

We're all Bozos on this bus!

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11252
(11270 all sites)
Registered: 3/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 05:30 PM
quote:
imagine if Miles ever played with Duane, the Dead, or Jimi.
I guess this is the closest we'll get.
can't wait to check this out


The late, great writer Robert Palmer paid tribute to Duane in the liner notes for Miles' Kind Of Blue, widely regarded as the greatest jazz record ever:


http://www.cannonball-adderley.com/miles/miles07.htm


Kind of Blue by Robert Palmer:

Playing gigs at the Fillmore East during the sixties made it easier for you to get in and catch other bands, even if tickets were sold out. As a young saxophonist in a rock band, I played there several times and attended numerous concerts; the one group I never missed (unless I had to be on the road) was the Allman Brothers Band. More specifically, I went to see their guitarist, Duane Allman, the only "rock" guitarist I had heard up to that point who could solo on a one-chord vamp for as long as half an hour or more, and not only avoid boring you but keep you absolutely riveted. Duane was a rare melodist and a dedicated student of music who was never evasive about the sources of his inspiration. "You know," he told me one night after soaring for hours on wings of lyrical song, "that kind of playing comes from Miles and Coltrane, and particularly Kind Of Blue. I've listened to that album so many times that for the past couple of years, I haven't hardly listened to anything else."

Earlier, I'd met Duane and his brother Gregg when they had a teenage band called the Hourglass. One day I'd played Duane a copy of Coltrane's Olé, an album recorded a little more than a year after Kind Of Blue but still heavily indebted to it. He was evidently fascinated; but a mere three or four years later, at the Fillmore, I heard a musician who'd grown in ways I never could have imagined. It's rare to see a musician grow that spectacularly, that fast; I'm not sure there's any guitarist who's come along since Duane's early death on the highway who has been able to sustain improvisation of such lyric beauty and epic expanse. But the influence of Kind Of Blue, even to the point of becoming a kind of obsession, wasn't unusual at all; it was highly characteristic of musicians of our generation, mine and Duane's. Of course, listening to an album isn't going to turn anyone into a genius; you can't get more out of the experience than you're capable of bringing to it. Duane brought something special, even unique to the table, but it seemed that everyone was sharing the meal. This was true among musicians categorized as "rock" or "pop" as well as among those labeled "jazz." In fact, the influence of Kind Of Blue has been so widespread and long-lasting, it's doubtful that anyone has yet grasped its ultimate dimensions. We know Kind Of Blue is a great and eminently listenable jazz album, "one of the most important, as well as sublimely beautiful albums in the history of jazz" in the words of Miles biographer Eric Nisenson. But there is more to it than that.

Music fans, not to mention critics and even more musicians, can be an opinionated and contentious bunch, even when it comes to works and artists almost universally admired as classics. It often seems no "great work" is sacrosanct. Not all rock aficionados share a high opinion of the Beatles' opus Sgt. Pepper, for example; to some, it's uneven, self-indulgent, overproduced, underwritten--and dated, a flower-power curio. The recent elevation of the late Robert Johnson to "King of the Delta Blues" has provoked grumbling from some scholars, who point out that Johnson sold few records in his lifetime and was never as influential among other musicians as Charley Patton, Son House, or even Muddy Waters. Or consider the case of John Coltrane, whose breathtaking solos on Kind Of Blue would seem to be an integral aspect of its charms. One influential critic, Martin Williams, gives Ornette Coleman his due but includes only one brief and somewhat atypical performance by any of Coltrane's bands on The Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz. There's no "Giant Steps," no "Chasin' the Trane," no "A Love Supreme"--all, presumably, "classic" jazz.

Kind Of Blue distances itself from even this exclusive company by having few, if any, notable detractors. Of course, we can always depend on at least some critics to miss the boat on its maiden voyage, and in fact, some early reviews of the album described Miles' playing as "morose," "maudlin," even "sluggish (!) and low in energy output." But a number of critics immediately recognized Kind Of Blue as a modern masterpiece, and in recent years little has been heard to the contrary. Not even the sort of after-the-fact analysis that has managed to make certain other recorded masterworks all-too-familiar, draining them of a great deal of their "magic" or "charge," has dimmed the luster of Kind Of Blue. Miles Davis never liked "explaining" his music, and when it comes to Kind Of Blue, the other musicians he chose as participants have managed to avoid analyzing the proceedings to death. Somehow, the experience of Kind Of Blue insists on retaining at least a touch of the ineffable.

Consider the circumstances. Miles took his musicians into the studio for the first of two sessions for Kind Of Blue, in March, 1959. At the time, "modal" jazz--in which the improviser was given a scale or series of scales (or "modes") as material to improvise from, rather than a sequence of chords or harmonies--was not an entirely new idea. Miles himself had tried something similar in 1958 with his tune "Milestones" (also known as "Miles") and when he and Gil Evans were recasting the songs from Gershwin's Porgy And Bess around that time, they rewrote "Summertime" to include a long modal vamp, with no chord changes. Originally, the idea for this kind of playing was the concept of composer George Russell, but his program for "modal jazz" came imbedded in an elaborate, all-embracing musical/philosophical theory, the "Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organization." Miles saw the approach, at least in part, as a way of drastically simplifying modern jazz, which was then pushing against the outer limits of chordal complexity. "The music has gotten thick," Davis complained in a 1958 interview for The Jazz Review. "Guys give me tunes and they're full of chords. I can't play them…I think a movement in jazz is beginning away from the conventional string of chords, and a return to emphasis on melodic rather than harmonic variation. There will be fewer chords but infinite possibilities as to what to do with them." Technical though it may seem to nonmusicians, Davis' statement can be reduced to a single, simple proposition: a return to melody. Kind Of Blue is, in a sense, all melody--and atmosphere. In essence, Miles Davis was looking for new forms that would encourage his musicians to improvise in streams of pure melody, which is an aspect of music as easily appreciated by the layman as by those who speak modal.

It's worth noting that Miles didn't just write out some simple, almost skeletal compositions, pass them around the band, and hope for the best. He chose his players carefully, bringing back the already departed pianist in his sextet, Bill Evans, for these sessions only. His group's new pianist Wynton Kelly was something of a blues specialist, and he was asked to play on one tune only, the blues "Freddie Freeloader." Some of the musicians credit Miles with "psyching" Kelly into playing that would fit seamlessly alongside Evans' work on the rest of the album. Perhaps. As Nisenson points out in his 'Round About Midnight, "The recording in and of itself was an experiment. None of the musicians had played any of the tunes before; in fact Miles had written out the settings for most of them only a few hours before the session... In addition, Miles stuck to his old recording procedure of having virtually no rehearsal and only one take for each tune." Nisenson quotes drummer Jimmy Cobb as saying of Kind Of Blue, "It must have been made in heaven," which may be as revealing an explanation as we're ever going to get. Because there is something transcendent, poetic, perhaps even heavenly about the music on Kind Of Blue. To check it out, go right to the only unused first take of the sessions, the alternative version of "Flamenco Sketches."

On any other Miles Davis album, the first, previously unheard take of "Flamenco Sketches " (the last selection on this disc) would have been a highlight. Listened to on its own, it is a group performance of the highest quality. The supple strength and firmly-centered tone of Paul Chambers' bass (heard here with a clarity unmatched by earlier reissues) is much the same on both performances. So is the precise clarify and unquenchable swing of Cobb's drumming. The solos by Miles, pianist Bill Evans, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley are different from the solos on the familiar, issued version of "Flamenco Sketches," as one would expect from improvisers of this caliber. Adderley, however, can be heard formulating and organizing melodic materials that coalesce into an altogether different sort of melodic statement on his second try, the issued take. And this, it seems to me, is precisely where Kind Of Blue comes into its own as a monument to sheer inspiration and creativity. Every solo seems to belong just as it is; it isn't so much theme-and-variations or a display of virtuosity as it is a king of singing.

Kind Of Blue flows with all the melodic warmth and sense of welcoming, wide-open vistas one hears in the most universal sort of song, all supported by a rigorous musical logic. For musicians, it has always been more than some beautiful music to listen to, although it is certainly that. It's also a how-to, a method for improvisers that shows them how to get at the pure melody all-too-frequently obscured by "hip" chord changes or flashy fingerwork. But no matter how much a musician or a listener brings to it (for this is one of those incredibly rare works equally popular among professionals and the public at large), Kind Of Blue always seems to have more to give. If we keep listening to it, again and again, throughout a lifetime--well, maybe that's because we sense there's still something more, something not yet heard.

Or maybe we just like paying periodic visits to heaven.

-Robert Palmer


I think this might possibly the finest tribute to and appreciation of Duane ever written.



 

____________________
"Love Like You've Never Been Hurt"-Satchel Paige

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 25201
(25201 all sites)
Registered: 9/7/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/16/2011 at 11:59 PM
Did ya catch Warren's Mahavishnu "La Mere de La Mer" tease during his Spanish Key solo on the 14th

far out man!

[Edited on 3/17/2011 by spacemonkey]

 

____________________
Keep on Smiling


 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6612
(6612 all sites)
Registered: 11/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/26/2011 at 01:47 PM
Just listened to the 3/14 "Spanish Key" again, and good God, that is some great music.

I can totally understand if it's not everyone's cup of tea, but this is right up my alley. Bill Evans on sax is just fantastic, and Derek is totally in his element here.

I like this version best of the 3 they have done this run, for two main reasons. This one has the best groove, that driving pulse that made the original version so great is strong here. Also, this is the only one of the 3 where they really hit the little turnaround riff.

Thank you Allman Brothers Band! I'll be listening to this jam for years to come

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1000
(1000 all sites)
Registered: 11/30/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/26/2011 at 02:46 PM
Just a reminder that this is not the Robert Palmer of the Addicted to Love fame. Its the other Robert Palmer.
 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 11252
(11270 all sites)
Registered: 3/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/26/2011 at 02:48 PM
quote:
Just a reminder that this is not the Robert Palmer of the Addicted to Love fame. Its the other Robert Palmer.



Right. This is the one who wrote Deep Blues:

http://www.amazon.com/Deep-Blues-Musical-Cultural-Mississippi/dp/0140062238 /ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1301168868&sr=1-3

 

____________________
"Love Like You've Never Been Hurt"-Satchel Paige

 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 299
(331 all sites)
Registered: 9/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/27/2011 at 11:51 AM
I would like to recommend this new release "Bitches Brew Live" to all Miles and Spanish Key lovers! I`m unable to get it out of my cd player for two weeks now...

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field -keywords=bitches+brew+live&x=0&y=0

 

____________________
Don´t dream your life - live your dreams!

 
E-Mail User

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6612
(6612 all sites)
Registered: 11/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/27/2011 at 01:09 PM
Werner, that Bitches Brew Live is great, especially the Isle of Wight show.

One of the things that made "Spanish Key" such a highlight of this year's Beacon run to me is the fact that I'd been on a Bitches Brew kick lately. I wrote up a review of the 40th Anniversary release for Hittin' the Note, and I had been giving the Bitches Brew Live release heavy rotation in my car for the week or so leading up to the beginning of the Beacon Run.

It's a great idea in principle for the ABB to play "Spanish Key" and for them to excute it as well as they did on 3/14 is just the icing on the cake. A really special Beacon moment!

 
E-Mail User
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com