Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: One of the underated greats Warren Zevon

Zen Peach





Posts: 26361
(26372 all sites)
Registered: 8/12/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 08:56 AM
Been watching some youtubes and its great stuff.

Warren Zevon - Roland The Headless Thompson Gunner
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhRRWwH3Fro

 

____________________

 
Replies:

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8643
(8641 all sites)
Registered: 12/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 09:09 AM
Love it, thanks for posting.

 

____________________
You want to talk to me
Go ahead and talk
Whatever you got to say to me
Won't come as any shock

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13864
(13918 all sites)
Registered: 7/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 10:13 AM
Great songwriter, great singer, great sense of humor! One of the under-appreciated greats!
Count me among his fans!

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 338
(339 all sites)
Registered: 3/24/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 10:54 AM
Interesting to see this thread; just today I began reading (for the 2nd time) his biography "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead". Have always been a big fan and appreciate his lyrics tremendously. What a writer he was...

I was so delighted when Jackson Browne covered not one, but two WZ songs when last I saw him in Berkley a month or two ago.

"Don't the trees look like crucified thieves........." That man had a way with words.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19026
(19030 all sites)
Registered: 10/5/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 12:40 PM
quote:
Interesting to see this thread; just today I began reading (for the 2nd time) his biography "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead". Have always been a big fan and appreciate his lyrics tremendously. What a writer he was...

I was so delighted when Jackson Browne covered not one, but two WZ songs when last I saw him in Berkley a month or two ago.

"Don't the trees look like crucified thieves........." That man had a way with words.




"I'll Sleep When I'm Dead"...great read.I've a;so read it twice......
as far as Zevon being "underated"....I'd have to disagree on that one...he got/get's a lot of props...

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13864
(13918 all sites)
Registered: 7/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 12:48 PM
quote:
quote:
Interesting to see this thread; just today I began reading (for the 2nd time) his biography "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead". Have always been a big fan and appreciate his lyrics tremendously. What a writer he was...

I was so delighted when Jackson Browne covered not one, but two WZ songs when last I saw him in Berkley a month or two ago.

"Don't the trees look like crucified thieves........." That man had a way with words.




"I'll Sleep When I'm Dead"...great read.I've a;so read it twice......
as far as Zevon being "underated"....I'd have to disagree on that one...he got/get's a lot of props...


Instead of saying "under rated", I probably should have said, "under appreciated". You read the book, so you know that besides "Werewolves of London", he never really achieved the critical success level (success measured in dollar signs) of many of his contemporaries. Warren Zevon was never a high-grossing act - tours or record sales-wise.
Most of the "props" that he received came from fellow musicians and fans who "got" what he was doing. In a time where three verses of two chords and "baby-baby-baby" makes an artist a million bucks, songwriters like Warren Zevon went by largely ignored by the record-buying masses. Unfair as hell, if you ask me.

[Edited on 9/3/2010 by Rusty]

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7627
(7627 all sites)
Registered: 10/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 02:32 PM
quote:

I was so delighted when Jackson Browne covered not one, but two WZ songs when last I saw him in Berkley a month or two ago.



I was at that same show and it blew me away. I know Browne did Carmelita; what other Zevon tune did he do? On the basis of Browne's version of Carmelita that night I bought the Zevon record that it's on, his first major label release, "Warren Zevon". THAT is one great record; songwriting not for the casual listener to be sure. In other words, none of it is on any classic rock playlists.

 

____________________
Don't let the sounds of your own wheels
Drive you crazy
Lighten up while you still can
Don't even try to understand
Just find a place to take your stand
And TAKE IT EASY

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19026
(19030 all sites)
Registered: 10/5/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 02:44 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
Interesting to see this thread; just today I began reading (for the 2nd time) his biography "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead". Have always been a big fan and appreciate his lyrics tremendously. What a writer he was...

I was so delighted when Jackson Browne covered not one, but two WZ songs when last I saw him in Berkley a month or two ago.

"Don't the trees look like crucified thieves........." That man had a way with words.




"I'll Sleep When I'm Dead"...great read.I've a;so read it twice......
as far as Zevon being "underated"....I'd have to disagree on that one...he got/get's a lot of props...


Instead of saying "under rated", I probably should have said, "under appreciated". You read the book, so you know that besides "Werewolves of London", he never really achieved the critical success level (success measured in dollar signs) of many of his contemporaries. Warren Zevon was never a high-grossing act - tours or record sales-wise.
Most of the "props" that he received came from fellow musicians and fans who "got" what he was doing. In a time where three verses of two chords and "baby-baby-baby" makes an artist a million bucks, songwriters like Warren Zevon went by largely ignored by the record-buying masses. Unfair as hell, if you ask me.

[Edited on 9/3/2010 by Rusty]



agreed,he never reached commercial success as measured in $$..but,he did get much respect from critics & musicians....I got to see him in concert twice...both were amazing shows....

 

____________________

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3911
(3918 all sites)
Registered: 11/19/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 03:54 PM
Big Warren Zevon fan here. Was lucky to catch him live a couple of times, once in 1990 on
the "Enemy of the People" Tour (He was promoting the Hindu Love Gods CD at the time) and
again in 1996 on the "Mutineer" tour.

I've always loved these quotes from other people when discussing Warren:

"I'm no linguist, but I believe Warren Zevon may be the only man in the history of
human communication to use the word "brucellosis" in a song." -David Letterman

"He did everything but drink vodka from a silver boot then." -Clint Eastwood

Funniest lyric from Warren (from "Lord Byron's Luggage"):

"I had a little friend named Mister Johnson
Who always tried to be like me
He rose to the heights of his profession
He was hard on his friends and family."

So sad that he passed away at an early age. The CD's "Life'll Kill Ya" (released in 2000)
and "My Ride's Here" (2001) represented a strong comeback. "The Wind" is a touching
farewell from Warren, as is the VH1 (Inside) Out DVD (documenting the making of
"The Wind"). And of course, "Stand in the Fire" is one of the greatest live albums of
all time.

Haven't listened to Warren in quite a while, but will probably break out some CD's
this evening. Thanks, Isaac.


 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 338
(339 all sites)
Registered: 3/24/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 03:56 PM
quote:
I know Browne did Carmelita; what other Zevon tune did he do?


Seminole Bingo - It was one of the first songs in the set, acoustic with just Browne and Lindley

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13864
(13918 all sites)
Registered: 7/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 04:10 PM
quote:
quote:
I know Browne did Carmelita; what other Zevon tune did he do?


Seminole Bingo - It was one of the first songs in the set, acoustic with just Browne and Lindley


Seminole Bingo - co-written by author, Carl Hiaasen! Carl is something of a guitarist himself. He also co-wrote Zevon's, "Basket Case" (also the title of one of his novels) and has mentioned the Allman Brothers and Gregg Allman in several of his books.

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9610
(9621 all sites)
Registered: 8/3/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 06:11 PM
Huge Warren fan here. I have everything that has been "officially " released including the true first album Wanted Dead or Alive, which was actually better than a lot of folks (and Warren) have given it credit for, the Hindu Love Gods album w/ R.E.M., and the Early Sessions album with early demos and his two lyme and cybelle 45's.

The man was the real deal. Obviously a very intellegent guy, his songs all read more like literary narratives than mere "pop" songs.

In some ways the musical equivalent of Hunter S. Thompson, (until he finally sobered up for good) he lived his art and used his demons to fuel his creativity. He never tried to hide his flaws. He insisted his ex-wife Cyrstal include all the bad with the good in his bio I'll sleep When I'm Dead.

I can not say enough about Warren. The guy was real. And his music will always move me.

RIP Warren Zevon




[Edited on 9/3/2010 by les_paul_sunburst]

 

____________________
"In my dream the pipes were playing
In my dream I lost a friend
Come down Gabriel and blow your horn
Cause some day we will meet again"

Fallen Angel -Robbie Robertson (for HughDuty...and for TanDan)


RIP Strider...(1999-2012)

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 4622
(2977 all sites)
Registered: 1/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 07:13 PM
Hasten Down The Wind (Favorite Warren ballad) and Linda did it well.

Lawyers Guns and Money, you have to love that

Carmalita is another legendary one, Echo Park and all....

seems I read he wrote symphonies.....

 

____________________
*We Speak Analog* all else is a foreign language...

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 67074
(67591 all sites)
Registered: 10/27/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 08:25 PM
quote:
Huge Warren fan here. I have everything that has been "officially " released including the true first album Wanted Dead or Alive, which was actually better than a lot of folks (and Warren) have given it credit for, the Hindu Love Gods album w/ R.E.M., and the Early Sessions album with early demos and his two lyme and cybelle 45's.

The man was the real deal. Obviously a very intellegent guy, his songs all read more like literary narratives than mere "pop" songs.

In some ways the musical equivalent of Hunter S. Thompson, (until he finally sobered up for good) he lived his art and used his demons to fuel his creativity. He never tried to hide his flaws. He insisted his ex-wife Cyrstal include all the bad with the good in his bio I'll sleep When I'm Dead.

I can not say enough about Warren. The guy was real. And his music will always move me.

RIP Warren Zevon




Huge Warren fan.

He and my father in law died the same day.

Cancer sucks.

 

____________________
Hittin' The Web::Hugh Duty Memorial Giveaway has begun!

RIP Hugh Duty

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8379
(8380 all sites)
Registered: 3/22/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 09:00 PM
This is shot by a fan in the audience, so the quality isn't perfect, but the emotional content just get me every time I watch/listen to it.

Warren doing Renegade live...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aN7QjW2KJkM

 

____________________
Obamacare: To insure the uninsured, we first make the insured
uninsured and then make them pay more to be insured again,
so the original uninsured can be insured for free.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8379
(8380 all sites)
Registered: 3/22/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/3/2010 at 09:18 PM
I was looking at the notes associated with the video linked above ^^

In it was a link to the history of how the song Renegade came to be. It's long, but rather moving, so I'll put it below for the Warren faithful to read. The page has a number of other interesting Warren stories and tidbits ( http://web.archive.org/web/20050827160212/http://members.aol.com/zevonfan1/ private/clms4.htm )

quote:
Zevon Is A Rugby Player

By Harry the Wheelchair Renegade


"Tell those rugby guys they can stay and listen to Warren all night if they want,
but they're gonna have to get down off the tables . . ."
--Common refrain from friendly bar managers in Atlanta, circa 1983

Zevonfan1 and I recently had an e-mail conversation about what might have motivated Warren Zevon to start using the "smoking skull" image on his album covers. We figure that its source may go back some years and is likely to be related to Hunter S. Thompson, but after some discussion, we agreed that we don't know with any certainty what made him start using it in the late eighties to adorn his albums. I have a working theory of its motivation which I'll explain with some historical perspective. Please understand that this is speculative - based on a true story yes, but speculative none-the-less -- so if someone out there knows for sure otherwise (like the honorable Mr. Zevon himself) please accept my apologies.

Back in the early eighties I played rugby for the Atlanta Renegades Rugby Football Club and, as a team, we invaded a Zevon concert one night in a now nonexistent Atlanta club named the Harvestmoon. It was a general admission concert that started rather early so we needed a volunteer to hold a place in line for the team. I was a graduate student at Georgia Tech at the time and was therefore able to break away from school easier than my working cohorts so I stepped forward. Armed with a bottle of Wild Turkey, another student and I went to the bar in the late afternoon and started the line out front. Not long after, Warren came along and greeted us casually as he went inside. That was cause for another shot which we liberally obliged ourselves. People showed up behind us as the afternoon turned to evening, but every time a teammate arrived we signaled them to come directly to the front of the line where we held sway. Those behind us grumbled but there wasn't any real confrontation. When the doors finally opened, we had at least twenty guys assembled. We crashed like a wave through the doors and proceeded to take possession of all the tables bordering the stage which was very close. That night Warren played solo with only an acoustic guitar. I've never seen anything less than a perfect show in the half-dozen concerts I've attended, but that one was particularly impressive because only he and his true talent were visible up there alone on that stark stage. We drank a lot of beer and made a lot of noise which I think he genuinely appreciated. At the suggestion of the single roadie accompanying him we even sang the "Time, time, time, for another peaceful war ..." background vocals when he sang "Roland." Somehow in the midst of the festivities, my teammate Dirt convinced me to take off my Renegades tee-shirt and during an intermission we gave it to the roadie as a gift to Warren. I guess I had started early enough not to know better. Anyhow, all hell broke lose when he came out to perform the encore wearing it. We were definitely hooked on Zevon music thereafter.

From then on, for about ten years, whenever he came to town, we'd gather the team and go. Got to the point where he would come on stage and shout "Renegade!" and commonly wore one of our jerseys which we gave him each time. Many times he ad-libbed the famous line in "Werewolves of London" to be "Little old lady got mutilated late last night, Renegades of Georgia again." One of our teammates who owned a bar in Atlanta (Aunt Charley's alas, also no longer in existence) moved in local entertainment circles so, with his connections, at least two times we got to hang around after the concert and meet him. With that he kind of became the patron saint of our team which was fitting because rugby players are not known to walk straight lines (especially for an officer of the law) and Warren is the ultimate outlaw.

We didn't reserve our fandom strictly for concerts either. Hardly did a Saturday night following a home game pass during our Fall or Spring seasons that we didn't gather around a keg in our team bar and serenade the other patrons with the entire album of "Excitable Boy." Whether they liked it or not. It didn't hurt, of course, that one of our teammates owned the bar, but even with that the refrain was heard more than once, "Tell those rugby guys they can stay and listen to Warren all night if they want, but they're gonna have to get down off the tables . .. ." Warren's lyrics were very apropos to our game and our rowdy attitudes and one can only hope it kept us out of a brawl or two.

Those were golden years for many of us who look back from the future now, but they weren't without tragedy. In April of 1988 we played a championship match against the Boston Rugby Football Club in Philadelphia and, in an ill-formed scrum I broke my neck, permanently paralyzing me from the chest down. The difficulty my family and I experienced as a result is profound, yet the comradery of my team went very far in easing the burden. And we certainly didn't let it keep us from Zevon concerts. The following winter, either late 88 or early 89, Warren return to Atlanta where he played a small bar named "The Cotton Club." He was accompanied by Timothy B. Schmidt of Eagles fame and some other fine musicians whom I regret I cannot now name. It again was a vintage Zevon performance and came to be very special for me under the auspices of my injury. Somehow one of our team members got word of my situation to Warren back stage during a break and when he came out for the second set he dedicated the next song to me. It was the inspirational "Mohammed's Radio." Big ugly rugby players had tears in their eyes. And the tremendous beauty of Warren's music is that it lives - I can listen to that song now as I write these words and be back there for moment with my wife by my side and those big men showing more emotion than they would probably care to admit. After the concert we had the privilege to hang out with Warren for a short time. Across a table in that darkened bar I got a rare opportunity to speak to him of his music. My graduate study years before was in physics and I asked him about "Run Straight Down" which talks about entropy. I found that he didn't throw concepts such as that around idly just because they sound good. It was gratifying to experience the depth of his lyrics first hand.

There were other concerts after that and of course other albums. I cannot overstate the euphoria born amongst my teammates when Mr. Bad Example was released with the song "Renegade." Surely, with its decidedly civil war tone and haunting lyrics about rebellion and standing together against all odds, he included it in recognition of our presence throughout the years. Then, in an interview published in the Atlanta Journal and Constitution newspaper around 1990, he confirmed that the song was written as an acknowledgment of our support. At the time we also came to accept that the smoking skull was motivated by our team logo which is a skull and crossbones and is featured on the shirts and jerseys we gave him over the years. We actually got free entrance to a 1990 show and the passes were black laminated clip-on badges with the skull in the background. Its white letters read "Warren Zevon Tour 90 V.I.P. Renegades." I have two of them on my desk as I write this. To reiterate, I can't confirm this point with any certainty. But our patron saint had smiled upon us and we took it as a nice gesture.

It has now been several years since I attended a Warren Zevon concert. Other Renegades and I moved away, younger players took our places on the rugby pitch, and the collective way we shared his music has diminished. Occasionally when I get to Atlanta we crank up "Excitable Boy," toss back some beers, and disturb the bar patrons. Of course it's not the same. But Warren Zevon gave us the gift of his music and that will remain. Old rugby players don't die - they just smell bad and listen to Warren Zevon records.

Corroboration of my story can be made through the Atlanta Renegades Rugby Football Club. Although I don't know a lot of the current players, many members from my era still live in the area. The team website is www.3dkinetics.com/atlrenegades. If you are ever in Atlanta, go to the bar "Mike and Angelos" on East Paces Ferry Rd. The owner, Mike Duggan, is the bar owner I mentioned above and he was at all the concerts. Tell him "Harry the Wheelchair Renegade sent me" and you'll make a friend. I'm sure Warren never knew my real name. I truly believe, however, that if you were ever to ask him if he has any vague memories of me by my nickname, he'd say "yes" and confirm this story. And I suppose he could tell you the history of the smoking skull as well.


 

____________________
Obamacare: To insure the uninsured, we first make the insured
uninsured and then make them pay more to be insured again,
so the original uninsured can be insured for free.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9610
(9621 all sites)
Registered: 8/3/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/4/2010 at 04:08 AM
quote:
I was looking at the notes associated with the video linked above ^^

In it was a link to the history of how the song Renegade came to be. It's long, but rather moving, so I'll put it below for the Warren faithful to read. The page has a number of other interesting Warren stories and tidbits ( http://web.archive.org/web/20050827160212/http://members.aol.com/zevonfan1/ private/clms4.htm )

quote:
Zevon Is A Rugby Player

By Harry the Wheelchair Renegade


"Tell those rugby guys they can stay and listen to Warren all night if they want,
but they're gonna have to get down off the tables . . ."
--Common refrain from friendly bar managers in Atlanta, circa 1983

Zevonfan1 and I recently had an e-mail conversation about what might have motivated Warren Zevon to start using the "smoking skull" image on his album covers. We figure that its source may go back some years and is likely to be related to Hunter S. Thompson, but after some discussion, we agreed that we don't know with any certainty what made him start using it in the late eighties to adorn his albums. I have a working theory of its motivation which I'll explain with some historical perspective. Please understand that this is speculative - based on a true story yes, but speculative none-the-less -- so if someone out there knows for sure otherwise (like the honorable Mr. Zevon himself) please accept my apologies.

Back in the early eighties I played rugby for the Atlanta Renegades Rugby Football Club and, as a team, we invaded a Zevon concert one night in a now nonexistent Atlanta club named the Harvestmoon. It was a general admission concert that started rather early so we needed a volunteer to hold a place in line for the team. I was a graduate student at Georgia Tech at the time and was therefore able to break away from school easier than my working cohorts so I stepped forward. Armed with a bottle of Wild Turkey, another student and I went to the bar in the late afternoon and started the line out front. Not long after, Warren came along and greeted us casually as he went inside. That was cause for another shot which we liberally obliged ourselves. People showed up behind us as the afternoon turned to evening, but every time a teammate arrived we signaled them to come directly to the front of the line where we held sway. Those behind us grumbled but there wasn't any real confrontation. When the doors finally opened, we had at least twenty guys assembled. We crashed like a wave through the doors and proceeded to take possession of all the tables bordering the stage which was very close. That night Warren played solo with only an acoustic guitar. I've never seen anything less than a perfect show in the half-dozen concerts I've attended, but that one was particularly impressive because only he and his true talent were visible up there alone on that stark stage. We drank a lot of beer and made a lot of noise which I think he genuinely appreciated. At the suggestion of the single roadie accompanying him we even sang the "Time, time, time, for another peaceful war ..." background vocals when he sang "Roland." Somehow in the midst of the festivities, my teammate Dirt convinced me to take off my Renegades tee-shirt and during an intermission we gave it to the roadie as a gift to Warren. I guess I had started early enough not to know better. Anyhow, all hell broke lose when he came out to perform the encore wearing it. We were definitely hooked on Zevon music thereafter.

From then on, for about ten years, whenever he came to town, we'd gather the team and go. Got to the point where he would come on stage and shout "Renegade!" and commonly wore one of our jerseys which we gave him each time. Many times he ad-libbed the famous line in "Werewolves of London" to be "Little old lady got mutilated late last night, Renegades of Georgia again." One of our teammates who owned a bar in Atlanta (Aunt Charley's alas, also no longer in existence) moved in local entertainment circles so, with his connections, at least two times we got to hang around after the concert and meet him. With that he kind of became the patron saint of our team which was fitting because rugby players are not known to walk straight lines (especially for an officer of the law) and Warren is the ultimate outlaw.

We didn't reserve our fandom strictly for concerts either. Hardly did a Saturday night following a home game pass during our Fall or Spring seasons that we didn't gather around a keg in our team bar and serenade the other patrons with the entire album of "Excitable Boy." Whether they liked it or not. It didn't hurt, of course, that one of our teammates owned the bar, but even with that the refrain was heard more than once, "Tell those rugby guys they can stay and listen to Warren all night if they want, but they're gonna have to get down off the tables . .. ." Warren's lyrics were very apropos to our game and our rowdy attitudes and one can only hope it kept us out of a brawl or two.

Those were golden years for many of us who look back from the future now, but they weren't without tragedy. In April of 1988 we played a championship match against the Boston Rugby Football Club in Philadelphia and, in an ill-formed scrum I broke my neck, permanently paralyzing me from the chest down. The difficulty my family and I experienced as a result is profound, yet the comradery of my team went very far in easing the burden. And we certainly didn't let it keep us from Zevon concerts. The following winter, either late 88 or early 89, Warren return to Atlanta where he played a small bar named "The Cotton Club." He was accompanied by Timothy B. Schmidt of Eagles fame and some other fine musicians whom I regret I cannot now name. It again was a vintage Zevon performance and came to be very special for me under the auspices of my injury. Somehow one of our team members got word of my situation to Warren back stage during a break and when he came out for the second set he dedicated the next song to me. It was the inspirational "Mohammed's Radio." Big ugly rugby players had tears in their eyes. And the tremendous beauty of Warren's music is that it lives - I can listen to that song now as I write these words and be back there for moment with my wife by my side and those big men showing more emotion than they would probably care to admit. After the concert we had the privilege to hang out with Warren for a short time. Across a table in that darkened bar I got a rare opportunity to speak to him of his music. My graduate study years before was in physics and I asked him about "Run Straight Down" which talks about entropy. I found that he didn't throw concepts such as that around idly just because they sound good. It was gratifying to experience the depth of his lyrics first hand.

There were other concerts after that and of course other albums. I cannot overstate the euphoria born amongst my teammates when Mr. Bad Example was released with the song "Renegade." Surely, with its decidedly civil war tone and haunting lyrics about rebellion and standing together against all odds, he included it in recognition of our presence throughout the years. Then, in an interview published in the Atlanta Journal and Constitution newspaper around 1990, he confirmed that the song was written as an acknowledgment of our support. At the time we also came to accept that the smoking skull was motivated by our team logo which is a skull and crossbones and is featured on the shirts and jerseys we gave him over the years. We actually got free entrance to a 1990 show and the passes were black laminated clip-on badges with the skull in the background. Its white letters read "Warren Zevon Tour 90 V.I.P. Renegades." I have two of them on my desk as I write this. To reiterate, I can't confirm this point with any certainty. But our patron saint had smiled upon us and we took it as a nice gesture.

It has now been several years since I attended a Warren Zevon concert. Other Renegades and I moved away, younger players took our places on the rugby pitch, and the collective way we shared his music has diminished. Occasionally when I get to Atlanta we crank up "Excitable Boy," toss back some beers, and disturb the bar patrons. Of course it's not the same. But Warren Zevon gave us the gift of his music and that will remain. Old rugby players don't die - they just smell bad and listen to Warren Zevon records.

Corroboration of my story can be made through the Atlanta Renegades Rugby Football Club. Although I don't know a lot of the current players, many members from my era still live in the area. The team website is www.3dkinetics.com/atlrenegades. If you are ever in Atlanta, go to the bar "Mike and Angelos" on East Paces Ferry Rd. The owner, Mike Duggan, is the bar owner I mentioned above and he was at all the concerts. Tell him "Harry the Wheelchair Renegade sent me" and you'll make a friend. I'm sure Warren never knew my real name. I truly believe, however, that if you were ever to ask him if he has any vague memories of me by my nickname, he'd say "yes" and confirm this story. And I suppose he could tell you the history of the smoking skull as well.





That was a very moving story. Thank you very much for posting it ...

 

____________________
"In my dream the pipes were playing
In my dream I lost a friend
Come down Gabriel and blow your horn
Cause some day we will meet again"

Fallen Angel -Robbie Robertson (for HughDuty...and for TanDan)


RIP Strider...(1999-2012)

 

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 4622
(2977 all sites)
Registered: 1/8/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/4/2010 at 10:09 AM
my my, thanks..............

 

____________________
*We Speak Analog* all else is a foreign language...

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 18593
(18594 all sites)
Registered: 11/20/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 9/4/2010 at 10:49 AM
Thanks so much, Fuji, for sharing this story here ... very cool account of the heart and humor of the man. Keeping you in my heart, Warren.

quote:
seems I read he wrote symphonies.....
I recall reading somewhere that he had classical training as a young man (with Stravinsky, no less) and I think it came out in his composition and use of strings in some of his songs. Don't know about symphonies but I wouldn't discount that.

 

____________________
"Come on down to the Mermaid Cafe and I will buy you a bottle of wine, and we'll laugh and toast to nothing and smash our empty glasses down..."

 
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software


Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com