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Author: Subject: A Tribute to the Allman Brothers Band (Please give it time to load, lots of content)

True Peach





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  posted on 1/6/2008 at 02:03 PM
It takes a while for everthing to load, so wait until is says DONE on the bottom left hand corner of your PC screen. You may have to load it "again" to get ALL the photos. Sometimes the ones from Rolling Stone do not come in, but they will if you try again and give it time. It would probably be wise to bookmark this thread. The Tribute is 21 pages long. Hell I could have did more.



Hey folks !

After countless hours(at least 30), I have completed The Allman Brothers Band Tribute. It's really nothing special. Most of the pictures and the youtube videos you have probably seen. I basically took the Wiki info and built a tribute around it. I have included all the ABB releases and solo releases also. The reviews come from various sites (AMG, Amazon fans and myself). Some reviews were edited, due to length and content. I edited out almost anything negative about the band, there may be a couple of album reviews that are critical. I left out almost anything negative in the band bio, firings, drugs, fueds..etc. This is a tribute to the postive side of the Allman Brothers Band. If you want the negative, i'm sure you can find it elsewhere. Thats not what I wanted. I don't see the band in any negative way.

One mistake I made was not giving proper credit for some of the Photo's, but i'm going to go back and try to get the photographers name. If I make any photographers angry, then PM me and let me know or just remove your photos. I will edit out any info that is wanted removed. Same with the Videos, I did get the names on most of those. But if I have added anything that goes against Lana, Rowland or any band members feelings. I will remove it a.s.a.p.

All I have done here is put the "puzzle" together. No Photo's, videos or anything were shot by me. I just wanted to try and do the band justice and give folks something to enjoy. Not only Forum Members, but Guest also. I have labeled each page and each photo. Instead of copying a photo for a quote, just refer to the page and photo number. If you shot any photo or photo and want credit for it...just PM me with the page and photo number or page and video. Although I know some folks have copyright protection, I have not taken any photos for the purpose of stealing them. Only to share with a community that loves and cherishes The Allman Brothers Band.

Like I said, i'm sure there is nothing new here, I'm sure most of you have seen all the stuff I have put in this Tribute.

PLEASE DO NOT POST ANY MORE PHOTOS TO THIS THREAD AT THE PRESENT TIME. THERE IS A LOT OF CONTENT ALREADY AND IT TAKES A WHILE TO LOAD. WE WILL WORK ON THAT AT A LATER DATE.

So here we go, a Tribute to the Allman Brothers, not by me. This tribute is really from the folks that shot the pictures and videos.

Hope you enjoy it !

And now Brothers and Sisters The Allman Brothers Band


#1



The Allman Brothers Band

The Allman Brothers Band is a band from Macon, Georgia, labeled by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as "the principal architects of Southern rock. Originally formed in 1969, two years later they were described by Rolling Stone's George Kimball as "the best damn rock and roll band this country has produced in the past five years." They have been feted for their live performances. The band has been awarded eleven Gold and five Platinum albums between 1971 and 2005. The band continues to record and tour to the present day.

Allman Joys
#2
The Allman Joys was an early band with Duane and Gregg Allman fronting. It was originally the Escorts, but it eventually evolved into the Allman Joys. Duane Allman quit highschool to focus his days at home practicing guitar. They auditioned for Bob Dylan's producer, Bob Johnston, at Columbia Records, backing a girl trio called The Sandpipers. In true Beatlesque style, Johnson was more interested in the girls... Eventually, they went on to form Hour Glass and then the Allman Brothers Band.

#3
Here's Duane with the Allman Joys in Pensacola backing up a cute little local trio called the Sandpipers.

Musician Credits

* Gregg Allman (Organ)
* Duane Allman (Lead guitar)
* Bobby Dennis (Rhythm Guitar)
* Jack Jackson (Rhythm Guitar)
* Ralph Bollinger (Bass guitar)
* Tommy Amato (Drums)
* Ronnie Wilkins (Piano)

Story

From the back of the Early Allman compilation (Allman Joys - Early Allman):

"One quiet Nashville evening back in '66, songwriter John D. Loudermilk walked into a small club called the Briar Patch. Up on the bandstand was what looked like just another of the thousands of teen age rock bands of the era. When they started to play, Loudermilk could tell they weren't so typical after all. The two front men were both blond and very intense. One played a trebly, stinging guitar; the other sang in an anguished, world-weary voice. John D. wondered how it was that these two looked so young yet played with so much experience. Needless to say, he was very interested in the group, which called themselves the Allman Joys. Allman was the surname of the two blond brothers, Duane and Gregg, who leg the band. Although he'd never produced before, Loudermilk decided to take the group into the studio and cut some sides on them.
One of the Allman Joys' sides, "Spoonful," was released locally and sold well. But Loudermilk had already decided to concentrate on song writing, so he brought the group to Buddy Killen, head of Dial Records. Killen thought the group was quite good, so he had John Hurley take them into the studio to record more tunes.
'They were really way ahead of their times, I realize now," Killen says. 'Nobody really understood what Duane and Gregg were all about at the time. Eventually I gave them their release and they went to California, leaving these tapes behind.' Duane and Gregg Allman went on to form Hour Glass and the Allman Brothers Band."


Discography
Early Allman - Featuring Duane and Gregg Allman (Compilation, 1973)

#4
Duane Allman plays Spoonfull at Fort Brandon Armory..were you there? They were soon to be renamed from the Allman Joys to the Allman Brothers.

#5
Greg Allman (Allman Joys) at Fort Brandon

#6
Allman Joys(Allman Brothers) thank you letter to WTBC mid 60's.

#7
Tuscaloosa's own, Bill Connell, at Fort Brandon Armory with the Allman Joys. Notice the tie.

#8
Allman Joys letter to WTBC "Good Guys" thanking them for playing "SpoonFull"

#9
Here are those brothers from Daytona with their hepcat band the Allman Joys.
Those haircuts are due to be back in style any. time. now. Photo's from Florida Cracker

#10
This is their LA psychodelic phase. Duane's in the middle with the ruffled shirt, and the one on the end in the cape is baby brother. Photo's from Florida Cracker


Page 1









[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 01:36 PM
The 31st of February

The 31st of February was a rock and roll band formed by Jacksonville, Florida natives Scott Boyer, David Brown and Butch Trucks.

All three were alumni of Englewood High School in Jacksonville, though they did not come together musically until Brown and Trucks found themselves living on the same floor of a dormitory at Florida State University in the fall of 1965. Having heard the folk-rock of groups like The Byrds and The Lovin' Spoonful, saxophonist Brown bought an electric bass and started to jam with drummer Trucks, an alumnus of The Vikings, The Echoes and the Jacksonville Symphonette. Guitarist and vocalist Boyer, making his living as a folk singer, was contacted by Brown who offered his and Trucks' services if Boyer would trade his acoustic guitar for an electric guitar. Boyer agreed and the three formed a group, The Bitter Ind. (short for Independents).

Playing fraternity parties, growing their hair long and ceasing to attend their classes (in Brown's and Trucks' cases), the group left Tallahassee after the end of the school year and tried their hand at performing in Daytona Beach. After being turned down repeatedly by club owners, the group found a bit of luck, landing a one-night performance at the Club Martinique. Shortly into their set, two members of the Allman Joys, a group that frequently appeared at the club, walked in and sat down. After the group finished, the two members introduced themselves and lavished praise on the group. They were the namesakes of the Allman Joys, Duane and Gregg Allman. When the Bitter Ind. relayed their story of their inability to get steady employment, the Allmans offered them free lodging. In time, the Bitter Ind. returned to Jacksonville discouraged, their meeting with the brothers Allman the only high point of their journey.

Shortly after returning to Jacksonville, however, Trucks received a call from Duane Allman, stating that the Allman Joys were playing at the Beachcomber, a Jacksonville club, and that they needed a drummer. Trucks agreed to sit in for the night. After the show, Duane Allman suggested to Trucks to ask the club manager to let the Bitter Ind. audition. The manager agreed, loved the group's sound and let them stay on through mid-1967. After their engagement ended, the group, no doubt under threat of legal action from the New York nightclub The Bitter End, decided to change their name. After briefly using the moniker "The Tiffany System", the group found themselves in Miami, Florida, signed to folk giant Vanguard Records as The 31st of February. Their eponymous debut album was released in early 1968, a heady mix of folk-rock and psychedelic pop. After its failure to get noticed, the group added a lead guitarist and began to rework their sound.

Almost immediately, the group again ran into Duane and Gregg Allman, who had just broken up their post-Allman Joys group The Hour Glass. Electing to join forces, the newly-hired guitarist was fired and the remaining five-piece began performing throughout the Southeast. In September 1968, they began recording material for their second album, including nacsent versions of "Melissa" (which would come out on the Allman Brothers Band's Eat A Peach album in 1972) and "Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out" (which Duane Allman would later cut with Derek and the Dominos). Though the material would not come out until four years later, they serve as an important bridge towards the sound that The Allman Brothers Band would be producing within twelve months. Whilst in the midst of recording and touring, Gregg Allman elected to move out to southern California in order to let his brother and the remaining members of the Hour Glass be freed from their contract with Liberty Records. Though Gregg offered the others positions in his backing band, nothing came of it and in a matter of months, Butch Trucks would join Duane and Gregg Allman in The Allman Brothers Band.

Scott Boyer ended up forming the group Cowboy with Tommy Talton, eventually signing to the Allman Brothers Band's label, Capricorn Records.

David Brown ended up a studio bassist, eventually joining the Boz Scaggs Band and, later, Cowboy with Boyer. He is currently a member of Norton Buffalo and the Knockouts.


Discography

* The 31st of February (Vanguard, 1968)
* Duane & Greg Allman (Bold, 1973)

The Hour Glass

#1

The Hour Glass were a 1960s rhythm and blues band based in Los Angeles, California between 1967 and 1968. Among their members were two future members of the Allman Brothers Band (Duane Allman and his brother Gregg) and three future studio musicians at the world-renowned Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama (Pete Carr, Johnny Sandlin and Paul Hornsby).

Formed from the ashes of two disbanded rival groups that had played the same southern circuit, The Allman Joys (based in Florida) and the Men-its (based in Alabama), the group was booked in early 1967 into a month-long engagement in St. Louis, Missouri, where they met members of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, whose manager, Bill McEuen, arranged for them a contract with Liberty Records.

Moving to Los Angeles, they were soon opening for groups like The Doors and Buffalo Springfield and recording their eponymous debut album, full of lighthearted poppy soul that was quite contrary to what the group was performing in various clubs and theatres in California such as the Fillmore West and Troubadour, picked out by the label from a pool of songwriters including Jackson Browne. The album flopped, perhaps due to the fact that the group, aside from Gregg Allman, was sparsely used in the studio.

Onstage, the group rarely performed tracks off of the album, preferring original material by the younger Allman alongside covers of Otis Redding and Yardbirds songs. Over the next few months, however, the group lingered, unable to perform outside of southern California due to label constraints. Eventually losing bassist Mabron McKinney, they soldiered on, performing concerts and recording a second album, Power of Love, which featured bassist Pete Carr. However, like their debut, Power of Love, which also featured the songwriting skills of Gregg Allman and material that fit the group much better than the material on their debut, flopped.

Pulling out one last-ditch effort by leaving Los Angeles to work at the legendary FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, the group recorded a handful of tracks that, for once, showed their full potential in the studio. After these tracks were rejected by the label, the group became dejected and broke up. The group over, Duane and Gregg Allman went to Jacksonville, Florida where they jammed with folk-rockers The 31st of February, featuring drummer Butch Trucks. The others went to do session work in Muscle Shoals.

Liberty Records threatening to sue the group for disbanding, they were given the rights to a solo album by Gregg Allman to keep them from doing so. However, tracks for the album were only issued twenty-five years later when they were released as bonus tracks on the compact disc reissues of the group's two albums. With his brother back in Los Angeles, Duane Allman temporarily joined his fellow bandmates in Muscle Shoals, eventually forming The Allman Brothers Band, enticing his brother back from Los Angeles.


Personnel

* Duane Allman - guitars, sitar, vocal
* Gregg Allman - vocal, organ, piano, guitar
* Paul Hornsby - piano, organ, guitar, vocal
* Johnny Sandlin - drums, guitar, gong
* Mabron McKinney - bass (1967)
* Pete Carr - bass, guitar, vocal (1967-1968)

Albums

* The Hour Glass (Liberty, 1967)
* Power of Love (Liberty, 1968)
* The Hour Glass (compilation) (United Artists, 1973)
* Southbound (compilation) (Acadia, 2004)

#2

#3

#4

#5
Here's Duane with the Hourglass in their groovy threads.
Unfortunately, this isn't the last we'll see of the striped pants baby brother is wearing.
Like a bad penny, they'll turn up again.
Wail on, Skydog! Photo from Florida Cracker

#6
From the Hourglass days: the Allman boys in matching shirts. Adorable! Photo from Florida Cracker


#7





Page 2

[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:48 PM
Beginnings

The band was formed in Jacksonville, Florida on March 26, 1969, and consisted of Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar), Gregg Allman (vocals, organ), Dickey Betts (lead guitar, rhythm guitar, vocals), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums) and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson (drums).

The actual Allman brothers, Duane and Gregg, had originally been in a garage band called the Escorts, then the Allman Joys and finally the Hour Glass. Duane Allman—with a stint as a session guitarist in Muscle Shoals, Alabama on Johnny Jenkins Ton-Ton Macoute! album behind him (it was to be Duane's first solo album before the ABB was formed)


#1
Jenkins' band, the Pinetoppers, was the stuff of local legend during the late 50s and early 60s and featured a young Otis Redding as lead vocalist. Otis, who was also serving as Johnny's valet, recorded his first hit, "These Arms of Mine" (with Jenkins on guitar), using the remainder of a Jenkins session for Stax Records in 1962.

Johnny Jenkins & the Pinetoppers(With Jimmy Hall)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DetneVLbayg

#2
Johnny Jenkins played his custom Bluesouth electric guitar on the front porch of his Macon, Ga., home.1996

Duane started jamming with Dickey Betts, Butch Trucks and Berry Oakley in Jacksonville. Eddie Hinton, with whom Duane Allman had played in Muscle Shoals, was considered to play guitar, but Hinton refused in order to join the Muscle Shoals studio band. Duane brought in Jaimoe, a drummer he had played with in the past. The nucleus of the band was now formed. Gregg was in Los Angeles, fulfilling the Hour Glass contract with Liberty Records. He was summoned back to Jacksonville by Duane to "fill out the band and sing."

The Allman Brothers Band played numerous shows in the south before releasing their debut album, The Allman Brothers Band.

#3
Critics loved it.This might be the best debut album ever delivered by an American blues band, a bold, powerful, hard-edged, soulful essay in electric blues with a native Southern ambience. Some lingering elements of the psychedelic era then drawing to a close can be found in "Dreams," along with the template for the group's on-stage workouts with "Whipping Post," and a solid cover of Muddy Waters' "Trouble No More." There isn't a bad song here.

Idlewild South (1970)
#4
The best studio album in the group's history, electric blues with an acoustic texture, virtuoso lead, slide, and organ playing, and a killer selection of songs, including "Midnight Rider," "Revival," "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'," and "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" in its embryonic studio version, which is pretty impressive even at a mere six minutes and change. They also do the best white cover of Willie Dixon's "Hoochie Coochie Man" anyone's ever likely to hear.


It was after the release of Idlewild South that Duane Allman joined in the recording of the classic Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs with Eric Clapton's Derek and the Dominos group.
#5
Wishing to escape the superstar expectations that sank Blind Faith before it was launched, Eric Clapton retreated with several sidemen from Delaney & Bonnie to record the material that would form Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. From these meager beginnings grew his greatest album. Duane Allman joined the band shortly after recording began, and his spectacular slide guitar pushed Clapton to new heights. Clapton, ignoring the traditions that occasionally painted him into a corner, simply tears through these songs with burning, intense emotion. He makes standards like "Have You Ever Loved a Woman" and "Nobody Knows You (When You're Down and Out)" into his own, while his collaborations with Bobby Whitlock -- including "Any Day" and "Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?" -- teem with passion.


1971 saw the release of a live album, At Fillmore East,
#6
Recorded on Friday and Saturday March 12 and March 13 of that year at the legendary rock venue the Fillmore East. The album was another huge hit. Rolling Stone listed At Fillmore East as one of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time . It showcased the band's unique mixture of jazz, classical music, hard rock, and blues, with arrangements propelled by Duane's and Betts' dual lead guitars, Oakley's long, melodic "third guitar" bass runs, the rhythm section's pervasively percussive yet dynamically flexible foundation, and Gregg Allman's gritty Ray Charles-like vocals and piano/organ play which all completed the band's wall of sound. The rendition of Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues" was a straight-ahead opener, the powerful "Whipping Post" (with its famous 11/8 bass opening) became the standard for an epic jam that never lost interest, while the ethereal-to-furious "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" invited comparisons to John Coltrane and Miles Davis and the complex and surpassingly subtle rhythms in the driving "One Way Out" kept beat-counters, as well as all others, at once puzzled and mesmerized.

The Allman Brothers received the honor of being the last act to play the Fillmore East before it closed in June 1971. The final shows there achieved legendary status, partly due to bands' literally playing all night; in 2005 Gregg Allman would relate how the jamming musicians lost track of time, not realizing it was dawn until the side doors of the Fillmore were opened and the morning light poured in. The band continued to tour; decades later, a special-order recording of one of their final concerts in this lineup, S.U.N.Y. at Stonybrook: Stonybrook, NY 9/19/71, would be released. It reveals that Duane Allman's slide guitar playing on "Dreams" and other songs was touching the farthest reaches of both that instrument and his imagination.









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[Edited on 2/5/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:49 PM
Loss and triumph

#1
Duane Allman died not long after the Fillmore East album was certified gold, killed in a motorcycle accident on October 29, 1971 in Macon, Georgia (at the corner of Hillcrest and Bartlett) when he lost control avoiding collision with a flatbed truck used to carry heavy pipe.
#2
The loss of their leader was hard for the group to bear, but they quickly decided to carry on. The album continued to gain FM radio airplay, with stations even playing 13-minute and 23-minute selections.





Dickey Betts filled Duane's former role in completing the last album he participated in, Eat a Peach.
#3
A tribute to the dearly departed Duane, Eat a Peach covers two albums, running through a side of new songs, recorded post-Duane, spending a full album on live cuts from the Fillmore East sessions, then offering a round of studio tracks Duane completed before his death. On the first side, they do suggest the mellowness of the Dickey Betts-led Brothers and Sisters, particularly on the lovely "Melissa," and this stands in direct contrast with the monumental live cuts that dominate the album. They're at the best on the punchier covers of "One Way Out" and "Trouble No More," both proof of the group's exceptional talents as a roadhouse blues-rock band, Duane gets his needed showcase on "Mountain Jam," a sprawling 33-minute jam that may feature a lot of great playing.The record showcases the Allmans at their peak, and it's hard not to feel sad as the acoustic guitars of "Little Martha" conclude the record.This release tributes the proof of Duane Allman's immense talents and contribution to the band.



The group played some concerts as a five-man band, then decided to add Chuck Leavell, a pianist, to gain another lead instrument but without directly replacing Duane. This new configuration debuted on ABC's In Concert late-night television program.


#4
Weeks later, on November 11, 1972, Berry Oakley died in another motorcycle accident, only three blocks from the site of Duane's accident (near Napier Avenue and Inverness Street).
#5


#6
Oakley was replaced by Lamar Williams at the end of 1972, in time to finish the next album, Brothers and Sisters (1973):
#7
Brothers and Sisters, the Allman Brothers Band's first new studio album in two years, shows off a leaner brand of musicianship, which, coupled with a pair of serious crowd-pleasers, "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica," helped drive it to the top of the charts for a month and a half and to platinum record sales. This was the first album to feature the group's new lineup, with Chuck Leavell on keyboards and Lamar Williams on bass, as well as Dickey Betts' emergence as a singer alongside Gregg Allman. The tracks appear on the album in the order in which they were recorded, and the first three, up through "Ramblin' Man," feature Berry Oakley -- their sound is rock-hard and crisp. Lamar Williams steps in and shows he was the man to replace the much missed Berry. The interplay between Leavell and Betts is beautiful on some songs, and Betts' slide on "Pony Boy" is a dazzling showcase that surprised everybody. It served as a template for some killer stage performances, and it proved that the band could survive the deaths of two key members.

#8


#9
Allman Brothers at Knebworth Festival 1974, Lamar Williams far right



#10
The Allman Brothers Band had become one of the top concert draws in the country. Probably their most celebrated performance of the era took place on July 28, 1973 at the Summer Jam at Watkins Glen outside Watkins Glen, New York, in a joint appearance with The Grateful Dead and The Band. Approximately 600,000 people were estimated to have made it to the racetrack where this massive outdoor festival took place.
#11
#12


In the wake of the Allman Brothers Band's success during this time, many other Southern rock groups rose to prominence, including the Marshall Tucker Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd.
#13
Marshall Tucker Band - Can't You See - 1973 - weldonwho2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvJNa918h78
Marshall Tucker Band "Take The Highway" - tellittothedevil
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5yyeyLnnoo
#14
Lynyrd Skynyrd-"Simple Man" (VideoTribute) -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3QCDd8UiMc - royalslack
Lynyrd Skynyrd - "Sweet Home Alabama" - gawlerpete
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHsDa9_HSlA
Another peak of the Allmans' success came on New Year's Eve, 1973, when promoter Bill Graham arranged for a nationwide radio broadcast of their concert from San Francisco's Cow Palace. New arrangements of familiar tunes such as "You Don't Love Me" went out over the airwaves, as the show stretched out over three sets, with Boz Scaggs sitting in, along with Grateful Dead members Jerry Garcia and Bill Kreutzmann (The Allmans and Grateful Dead members guested at each others shows multiple times in the early 1970s).
#15

#16

Below is a link to this concert and Wolfgangs Vault:

Set 1
http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/dt/the-allman-brothers-band-concert/2105 -7096.html
Set 2
http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/dt/the-allman-brothers-band-concert/5069 5-7096.html
Set 3
http://concerts.wolfgangsvault.com/dt/the-allman-brothers-band-concert/5069 6-7096.html



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[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:49 PM
Turmoil and dissolution

Personality conflicts started to tear the band apart, however. Gregg Allman and Dickey Betts both began solo careers, while Allman married Cher, separated quickly, reconciled, and eventually separated again. Musically, Betts and Leavell were pulling in opposite directions, with Allman trying to mediate. The tension resulted in Win, Lose or Draw (1975):
#1
Some feel this was a poor showing from the group, considering the two-year lag between albums and what had come before. Despite a good cover of Muddy Waters' "Can't Lose What You Never Had" -- highlighted by a great Dickey Betts solo -- as an opener, there's not much here that's first-rate. The title track and Dickey Betts' instrumental "High Falls" are among the few highlights. The album's main fault lies not with what it is, but what it could have been, and who it's from. Some members did not participate on all tracks or doing so only from afar.Later, Leavell, Johanson, and Williams would form Sea Level, while Betts worked on his solo career.

Later, Leavell, Johanson, and Williams would form Sea Level, while Betts worked on his solo career.

Meanwhile, Capricorn Records released a compilation album, The Road Goes On Forever, and a live album, Wipe the Windows, Check the Oil, Dollar Gas.
#2
The 1973-1974 Allman Brothers Band featured here is the one that most fans actually saw, since a lot of listeners didn't discover them or get to their concerts until after the deaths of Duane Allman and Berry Oakley.Wipe the Windows isn't a landmark release like the Fillmore tapes.But no Allman Brothers Band fan should pass it up, for it is a most solid live album.This second-generation band, with Dickey Betts as the sole lead guitar and Gregg Allman and Chuck Leavell sharing the keyboards, also performs a preconceived version of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed".Compiled from shows in New Orleans, San Francisco, Bakersfield, Oakland, and Watkins Glen (New York).


#3
The group reformed in 1978 and released the strong Enlightened Rogues (1979).
#4
It featured new members Dan Toler (guitar) and David "Rook" Goldflies (bass), who replaced Leavell and Williams, both of whom concentrated on Sea Level instead. The Allman Brothers Band's best studio album since Brothers and Sisters is a loud, brash, collection of consistently solid if not first-rate songs. The singing is some of the best since Idlewild South. The dual-guitar lineup of Dickey Betts and Dan Toler is a reminder of what the group had been missing since Duane Allman's death. The music isn't earth-shattering, but it is exciting through and through.
#5

#6

#7

#8


The Allman Brothers Band signed to Arista Records. The group released a pair of critically-slammed albums, and then disbanded once again in early 1982.
#9
The second album from Allmans Mach Two shows them holding their own, wearing their influences (especially gospel) a bit more on their sleeves, and even coming up with a minor single in "Angeline."
#10
By the time the 1980s rolled around, the Allman Brothers had endured such a tumultuous ride the decade prior, that almost all of the air was let out of their musical tires by the time Brothers of the Road hit the record stands. Many of the elements of the Allman Brothers' sound remain intact here, but there are several things lacking that make this a less than essential album. The raw, rugged jams with climatic buildups and blistering guitar workouts have been substituted for a glossier, more pop-friendly sheen (thanks in no part to Clive Davis' involvement with the group at the time). And while "Straight From the Heart" saw a reasonable campaign on the charts, the rest of the album is tepid at best.

#12


Allman quickly formed the Gregg Allman Band with the Toler brothers in 1982 and began touring small venues and clubs. Betts, Leavell, Trucks and Goldflies formed the band Betts Hall Leavell Trucks (BHLT). Neither garnered attention from any record labels. BHLT would dissolve two years later.
#13

The Allman Brothers reunited in 1986 for a pair of benefit concerts for promoter Bill Graham in New York and Macon. Allman, Betts, Trucks, Jaimoe, Leavell, and Dan Toler performed together but no subsequent reunion plans for the band were made. The following year, the Gregg Allman Band and the Dickey Betts Band co-headlined a theatre and club tour. After each band played a set of music, Betts, Allman and the Tolers performed a closing set of Allman Brothers music together.

In 1987, Epic Records signed both Allman and Betts to separate solo contracts. The Gregg Allman Band had a surprise FM hit single with the title track to the 1987 album I'm No Angel. Just Before the Bullets Fly quickly followed from Allman in 1988.

The Dickey Betts Band was also formed during this time and released the album Pattern Disruptive in 1988. This series of collaboration among bandmembers and interest from a major label during the late 1980s laid the groundwork for next era of Allman Brothers Band activity and success.


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[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:49 PM
Revival



In 1989 The Allman Brothers reunited and returned to popular consciousness of the American public, spurred by Allman's recent FM radio solo success, the release of archival material by PolyGram, and the start of regular appearances on the American summer outdoor amphitheatre circuit. Warren Haynes (guitar, vocals), Johnny Neel (keyboards and harmonica), and Allen Woody (bass guitar) joined originals Allman, Betts, Jaimoe and Trucks. Leavell opted to go on tour again with the Rolling Stones, with whom he has been a touring member since 1982.
#1
After the 20th Anniversary tour, the band signed to Epic Records and released Seven Turns (1990), which got excellent reviews
:
#2
The Allman Brothers Band's comeback album, and their best blues-based outing since Idlewild South that restored a lot of their reputation. With Tom Dowd running the session, and the group free to make the music they wanted to, they ended up producing this bold, rock-hard album, made up mostly of songs by Dickey Betts (with contributions by new keyboardman Johnny Neel and lead guitarist Warren Haynes), almost every one of them a winner. Apart from the ripping opening number, "Good Clean Fun," which he co-authored, Gregg Allman's contribution is limited to singing and the organ, but the band seem more confident than ever, ripping through numbers like "Low Down Dirty Mean," "Shine It On," and "Let Me Ride" like they were inventing blues-rock here, and the Ornette Coleman-inspired "True Gravity" is their best instrumental since "Jessica."

#3
This was followed by Neel's departure and a series of moderately-selling, but critically well-received albums including Shades Of Two Worlds (1991)
#4
The group's follow-up to their comeback album is a major step forward, with more mature songs, more improvisation than the group had featured in their work since the early 1970s, and more confidence than they'd shown since Brothers and Sisters. It's all here, from acoustic bottleneck playing ("Come On In My Kitchen") to jazz improvisation ("Kind of Bird"), with the most reflective songwriting ("Nobody Knows") in their history.

Next came Where It All Begins (1994, certified Gold by the RIAA 1998),
#5
The Allman Brothers Band returned to record the surprisingly consistent live-in-the-studio venture Where It All Begins. It is l a solidly consistent album, driven by some of the virtues of live spontaneity. Highlights include Gregg Allman's frank drug song "All Night Train," the Bo Diddley-beat-driven "No One to Run With," and the glorious dual-guitar workout "Back Where It All Begins."

Both featuring new percussionist Marc Quinones. Warren Haynes and Allen Woody formed their own side project Gov't Mule in 1994. In 1995, the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 1996 they won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for "Jessica". When Haynes and Woody decided to concentrate full-time on Gov't Mule in 1997, Haynes was replaced on guitar by Jack Pearson.
#6
Woody was replaced on bass by Oteil Burbridge. Derek Trucks, nephew of original Brother Butch Trucks, replaced Pearson in 1999.

In 2000, the band forced Dickey Betts out for "personal and professional reasons." For this tour, he was replaced by Jimmy Herring.
#7
During the year 2000, former bassist Allen Woody was found dead on August 26th.:
#8
#9

The band did release the live CD Peakin' at the Beacon that year which chronicled the now-annual March tradition of a many-night stand at the Beacon Theater in New York City. The band has played the 2900-seat Upper West Side Manhattan theatre 173 times since 1989. The tradition is known as the "Beacon Run" among fans, who travel from across the United States, Canada and Western Europe to see these annual March and April shows.


Warren Haynes began appearing with the Allmans again in 2000 and rejoined full-time in 2001, while also maintaining his active schedule with Gov't Mule. (Haynes also toured during this time with Phil Lesh and Friends, and later with The Dead in 2004). Haynes' return marked a new period of stability and productivity for the band after nearly four years of lineup changes. The Haynes-produced Hittin' the Note was released in 2003 to popular and critical acclaim:
#10
The Allmans went into the studio to make their first album of new material in a decade, and the band's first record ever without guitarist Dickey Betts, who wrote and sang the last of the band's true hits in the 1970s. The result weighs on the latter side of the equation -- nervousness and fear that the old-road dogs didn't have it in them to make new music are completely unfounded. Hittin' the Note is the band's finest studio outing since Brothers and Sisters over 20 years before. The level of songwriting, inspiration, and execution is more than admirable; it's downright bone-chilling in places. Haynes, whose ringing, stinging tone cuts through the mix like a fine-edged stiletto, is complemented beautifully by Derek Trucks. Trucks displays the round-toned beauty that adds warmth and dimension to the twin-guitar interplay that is very much built on the Duane Allman/Betts model, but creates shadowy chord figures that come more from jazz than blues, adding another shade to the tonal palette. But it's the sheer melodic power and soul feel that comes right through a studio soundboard that is most astonishing. The band is given a more thundering intensity by drummers Jaimoe and Butch Trucks and percussionist Marc Quiñones. The bass chair is held down by newcomer Oteil Burbridge. In sum, Hittin' the Note does exactly what its title claims -- 11 tracks' worth and it burns on every one. This album is in-the-pocket, deep-grooving Allman Brothers Band blues-rock at its best.

As was the Live At the Beacon Theatre DVD film (2003, certified Platinum 2004).
#11

The live CD One Way Out(2004) also chronicled the Beacon concerts.
#12
Do we really need another live double CD by the Allman Brothers Band? Oh yeah. In fact, when they play this well, we need them in droves.This new version of the band with Trucks and Haynes manning the guitars has gelled into a formidable unit; in fact, they are something spectacular. Add to the fact that Gregg Allman is singing and playing better than at any time in his life (and Haynes is no slouch either), and you have the best live band in the world, bar none. Jaimoe and Butch Trucks weave in and through one another to provide an edgy, rollicking ballast to the separate-channel guitars of Derek Trucks and Haynes, who don't duel so much as propel one another to flights of six-string soulfulness and dizzying high-wire pyrotechnics -- Derek's slide playing is otherworldly; it's full of Indian modal and jazz scales, and Haynes, is, well, Warren Haynes. The other notable thing about One Way Out is its sound. Never has a live mix come across with such immediacy and dynamic tension. This is the sound of a band in the room with you. You are hearing the music as it was made from the stage; the listener is in the mix, not in front of it. Pair this with Hittin' the Note, the studio album from 2003, and you have the sound of a band that has no peers. One Way Out is essential for anyone interested in rock & roll. Period.

The Allman Brothers garnered back to back Grammy Award nominations in 2003 and 2004 in the category of Best Rock Instrumental for performances of "Instrumental Illness" from Hittin' The Note and One Way Out. In 2003, Rolling Stone Magazine named Duane Allman, Warren Haynes, Dickey Betts, and Derek Trucks to their list of 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time , with Allman coming in at #2 and Trucks being the youngest guitarist on their list.

The Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks lineup continued the band's connection with younger music fans via concert pairings with popular jam bands moe., The String Cheese Incident, and Dave Matthews Band among others. The Allman Brothers were a major attraction at the Bonnaroo Music Festival in 2003 and 2005. Since 2005, the Allmans have staged their own two day Wanee Music Festival at the Spirit of Suwanee Music Park in Live Oak, Florida. The Allmans, Gov't Mule and The Derek Trucks Band perform on different stages along with younger roots artists including the North Mississippi Allstars, Robert Randolph and The Family Band, Medeski, Martin and Wood, Devon Allman's Honeytribe, Nickel Creek,and others.

Allman Brothers' songs have been used in various advertising campaigns and television programs, with the most well-known use being that of "Jessica" used in both formats of the BBC television series Top Gear.


#13


Page - 6






[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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Karma:
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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:50 PM
Other notable Allman Brothers Band releases:


#1
Beginnings was originally put together by Atco as a double LP to encourage new fans who'd missed them to buy the group's first two albums, and proved so successful that it was kept in print on CD by Polydor when it acquired the group's catalog.


#2
A two-LP set compiled from The Allmans' first five albums was released for the 1975 Christmas season when Win Lose Or Draw took a quick nosedive on the charts. It features a lot of good music, but The Allmans aren't a singles band, so compilations don't really do them justice unless, like Dreams, they have a lot of time to do so.

#3
Spanning four discs and nearly 100 tracks, Dreams is one of those rare box sets that tells a story while delivering the definitive word on its subject. Its success has a lot to do with its status as Polygram/Bill Levinson's sequel to the acclaimed hit Crossroads, which summarized Eric Clapton's winding career perfectly. They follow the same approach here, gathering pre-Allman's recordings from the clan, including cuts by the Allman Joys, selecting the hits from the classic years, and adding stray cuts by solo projects to the mix. It's a smart move and it results in a terrific box that truly offers the definitive word on one of the longest-running dramas in Southern rock. Yes, the Allmans reunited rather successfully after this box, so none of that material is here, but it's not missed -- this is the story of the band.


#4
Live at Ludlow Garage 1970 features 91 minutes of the Allman Brothers Band in concert at a Cincinnati venue that they loved, nearly a year before their legendary Fillmore shows.They build their set on ambitious reinterpretations of songs by Blind Willie McTell, Muddy Waters ("Trouble in Mind"), John Lee Hooker ("Dimples"), and Willie Dixon (whose "Hoochie Coochie Man" is a soaring highlight of this two-disc set, in a version that makes every other white band's cover seem wimpy by comparison), climaxing with a searing 44-minute version of "Mountain Jam."

#5
A good idea that worked out even better, with one small caveat. The Fillmore Concerts is made up of performances from the two Fillmore shows that originally comprised Live at the Fillmore East and the concert portions of Eat a Peach, plus one track ("One Way Out") from a Fillmore show from a couple of months later. The 16-track masters from each show are transferred to digital and remixed by original producer Tom Dowd. The sound is sterling and the two-hour-plus running time makes this a dream for fans of the band, as well as an improvement on the original releases of this material. It is also a slightly less honest release, where "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" is concerned -- Dowd edited the version here together from two different performances, first and second shows, the dividing line being where Duane Allman's solo comes in. Not that this is the only concert album where this kind of editing has been done, but the original Live at the Fillmore contained a single take of the song, and some purists may prefer that. Otherwise, this set runs circles around more than 99 percent of the guitar albums ever released, with breathtaking sound

#6
A good live album, but not quite the worthy successor to the Fillmore shows in their various forms -- the band is in form throughout this more than one-hour distillation of shows in Boston and New York from their 1992 tour, covering old and new repertory, but there are no surprises.The crispness of the recording helps one fully appreciate the power and articulation of the playing by everyone, but especially Dickey Betts and Warren Haynes.

#7
The Allman Brothers Band's fifth live release in 25 years, cut during 1994 in Raleigh, NC, and at the Garden State Arts Center in New Jersey, is a high-water mark in their Epic Records catalog. If anything, they're even better here than they were on the earlier Evening With the Allman Brothers Band, the old material getting fresh new approaches -- the band was on for both nights, and presented sets, including an acoustic version of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and "Jessica" (which won a Grammy Award), that soared and flowed, especially Dickey Betts and Warren Haynes' guitars. What's more, the clarity of the recording and the volume at which it was recorded make this a most rewarding 70 minutes of live music on a purely technical level -- you can practically hear the action on the guitars during the acoustic set. It won't replace Live at Fillmore East or the live portions of Eat a Peach, but it deserves a place on the shelf not very far from them.

#8
The Allman Brothers shared the bill with the Grateful Dead on several notable occasions. This release recalls the Brothers in support of the Dead and Love in February 1970 at the fabulous Fillmore East. No specific dates for the performances are noted, so it is presumed this release is a composite from recordings made at some point during the two sets per night that the Allman's performed on February 11th through the 14th. There is no mistaking the unbridled fervor of the original line-up of the band. Rising to the challenge of exploratory psychedelia -- while remaining ever faithful to their Southern blues roots -- blues standards such as "(I'm Gonna Move to The) Outskirts of Town" and "Hoochie Coochie Man" are strengthened and extended beyond their typical assertions. No longer are they relegated to the inadequately rendered thrashings of garage rock. Betts and the Allman's understand the dynamics of blues. It is out of this respect for the art form that the band is able to pull off such authentic psychedelia-tinged Delta sounds. Likewise, the Allman Brothers were beginning to ascend as not only premier interpreters, but purveyors of a revolutionary new electric guitar-driven blues movement including the likes of Led Zeppelin, Eric Clapton's various outings, as well as the Ron "Pigpen" McKernan-led Grateful Dead. The early originals and performance staples "Whipping Post," "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed," and "Mountain Jam" -- which is based on the Donovan Leitch song -- are nothing short of revelatory. The band gels instantly into a symbiotic instrument with each member both playing and listening in equal measure. The recording also bears mentioning. Stanley Owsley -- the Grateful Dead's very own sonic solution -- recorded this music the same way that he documented the Dead night after night. His theories on live recording are unique and capture aural insights that are lost to some. Fillmore East, February 1970 is available exclusively through Grateful Dead Production.

#9
The Allman Brothers Band during the Beacon run of 2000, their first new album release in five and a half years, Peakin' at the Beacon. Derek Trucks, making his recorded debut with the band. There is plenty of guitar work, and it is up to the Allmans' usual standard. Following the instrumental opener, Gregg Allman sings lead on seven straight songs, all of which come from the band's first three studio albums. Betts finally appears as a vocalist on the ninth track, the 1990 folk-country tune "Seven Turns." Finally, there is a 27-and-a-half-minute version of the 1975 Betts instrumental "High Falls," a typical extended workout complete with jazzy interludes and a lengthy percussion section. The Allmans may not have been due for another live album (two of their last three releases being concert recordings), but the series of Beacon shows has become an annual event, and the disc serves as a souvenir from the March 2000 shows. Fans who attended those shows, or who just want to be reassured that the Allmans sound much the same as ever, may enjoy the album.

#10
The initial release of The Road Goes on Forever was solid, containing the simple basics of the Allmans' Capricorn recordings. The expanded version that Mercury released in 2001 improves it considerably by almost doubling its running length with 13 bonus tracks and sprawling over two full CDs. This gives plenty of space to showcase the Allmans at their unrestrained best, capturing some of their finest concert jams while sketching a full portrait of their time at Capricorn. As a historic document, the box Dreams still can't be beat, but for listeners who want a thorough anthology that's not exhaustive, this is an excellent choice.


#11
The Allman Brothers Band launch their own record label with a vintage live recording that appears to have sentimental value for at least one rabid fan, band manager Bert Holman, who, in his freshman year, booked the Allman Brothers to play two shows at the Leonard Gym at his college, American University, on Sunday, December 13, 1970, at 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. (The CD is drawn from both shows, with tracks one through five from the second set and "You Don't Love Me" and "Whippin' Post" from the first.) Holman provides liner notes that explain his involvement nostalgically, but for the listener, what is perhaps more important is that the Allmans were at a crucial stage in their development on that December night, having just returned from shows at the Fillmore East in New York on a tour promoting their second album, Idlewild South. Three months hence, they would return to the Fillmore East and perform the show captured on their epochal Live at Fillmore East album. So, the band playing at American University is near to the best the group could be. The set includes "Statesboro Blues," "Stormy Monday," and "You Don't Love Me," blues covers that would be repeated at the Fillmore and turn up on Live at Fillmore East, though the songs and the Allmans' treatment of them might have been unfamiliar to those in the audience at American University. "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" and "Leave My Blues at Home" had just appeared on Idlewild South, and this release marks the first live versions of them to be released by the Allmans. There is little new here, but the playing is fierce, especially the interaction of Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, and with a solid 20-plus-minute version of "Whippin' Post," Allman Brothers Band fans should be pleased with the band's first self-released effort.

#12
For the first time anywhere -- officially or not -- two (mostly) complete performances by the Allman Brothers at the Atlanta International Pop Festival over the Fourth of July weekend (they were the bookends of the fest) in 1970 have been issued with stellar sound, complete annotation and cool liner notes. The festival took place while the Allmans were in the process of recording their second album, Idlewild South, when they appeared on July 3 as the hometown openers of the entire festival and proceeded to blow the minds of over 100,000 people -- for their last set on July 5 at 3:50 a.m. they performed in front of as many as 500,000. Musically, other than a somewhat stiff version of "Statesboro Blues," the July 3 set is magical. There is a stunning version of "Dreams" lasting almost ten minutes with beautiful Hammond/guitar interplay between Gregg and Dickey. Long and ferocious versions of "Whipping Post" and "Mountain Jam" are here, but the track on the July 3 set is Berry Oakley's feral vocal read of Willie Dixon's "Hoochie Coochie Man." " A short (5:49) version of this song, it has a rock & roll immediacy that is strained out of the longer versions to gain the improvisational edge. Disc one also restores Gregg Allman's "Every Hungry Woman," to its rightful place -- previously only having been available on an anthology. Harp player Thom Doucette, no stranger to ABB fans, is here aplenty, adding his righteous, stinging harp lines to many tracks on both nights. The way Gregg's organ playing is recorded here offers a new view of just how integral an anchor he was for both guitarists to play off. He is a monster musician and, even at this early date, was showing off his improvisational and rhythmic skills.

Disc two is graced by the original live mixes of "Statesboro Blues" and "Whipping Post" that were released on First Great Rock Festivals of the Seventies and these are stunning for their intensity and focus, as well as clarity. "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" is as tough a set opener as there is with the ringing slide guitars attacking one another and going for broke to kick things off. The long versions of "Stormy Monday" and "'Liz Reed" are among the most intimate and groundbreaking the band ever recorded, while "Whipping Post" transmutes itself into a jazz tune for a few minutes and changes everything. The nearly half-hour "Mountain Jam" is deepened here by the addition of a third guitarist: Johnny Winter sits in with the ABB and Doucette for the definitive version of this classic -- you can forget the one on Eat a Peach after this. While it won't replace Live at the Fillmore East as the greatest live record ever made, this is an essential purchase for ABB fans, one that gives us the treat of a dignified rendering of a very important and defining moment in the band's early career. It also provides an excellent, even mind-blowing introduction to a band that was at the peak of its power.


#13
This album, recorded a scant five weeks before guitarist Duane's death. Annotator John Lynskey acknowledges that, also unlike the Dead, the Allmans did not vary their set list very much. "The Allman Brothers might have played the same songs night after night," he admits, "but they were never played the same way twice." The album, which compiles material from two shows on the same night, backs up his assertion. The titles may be familiar, but the jamming is not, as the band explores different ways to approach the songs, including one that is still in development. "Blue Sky," which would not appear on record until the group's next album, Eat a Peach, gets an 11-minute treatment that is a showcase for Duane Allman and Dickey Betts' guitar interaction. Six months after the legendary shows that produced their signature recording, At Fillmore East, and just before they changed forever with Duane Allman's death, this is the sound of the Allman Brothers Band at their peak.

#14
In Stand Back's subtitle, the word "The" is no mistake, nor is it a grammatical convenience. This sprawling two-disc set is the only cross-licensed retrospective to dig into the all of the band's studio recordings from its debut in 1969 to 2003's Hittin' the Note and to offer not only representative cuts but the shining examples of the band's studio and live prowess, its transitions from incarnation to reincarnation to mutation, and its seminal At Fillmore East live set. Disc one is comprised of five cuts from The Allman Brothers Band, three from Idlewild South, two from At Fillmore East (the 13-plus minute "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed " and "Statesboro Blues"), and a whopping six cuts from Eat a Peach. Disc two begins with a handful from Brothers and Sisters, a pair each from Win, Lose or Draw and Enlightened Rogues, and Dickey Betts' brilliant "Hell & High Water" from Reach for the Sky, issued in 1980. It goes on to include tracks from Brothers of the Road, Seven Turns, Shades of Two Worlds, and Where It All Begins, and ends with an edited version of Gregg Allman and Warren Haynes' fine "High Cost of Low Living." There are 32 tracks in all, and the sound and package are excellent. Certainly it serves as a great introduction for the newcomer, but perhaps more importantly, it is the only place to get all the band's best cuts from albums that are sometimes spotty. Producer Bill Levenson has, with input from the band, assembled a truly awesome, even unbeatable collection.



#15
This third release, the archivists turn to the lineup that existed just after Duane Allman's death, which consisted simply of the remaining five members: singer/keyboard player Gregg Allman, guitarist/singer Dickey Betts, bass player Berry Oakley, and drummers Jaimoe and Butch Trucks. After Duane died, the decision to continue without him was made quickly, but the band did not consider replacing him. Since a hallmark of their sound had been the twin guitar parts of Allman and Betts, however, some rearrangement of the material was necessary. The two shows compressed into nearly 98 minutes on the two CDs here occurred less than four months after the accident, but according to annotator John Lynskey, the Allmans were making their 23rd appearance as a quintet. So, the performance finds them settled into the new approach. It is one in which Gregg Allman's organ playing is more prominent, and in which, as Lynskey notes, Oakley is adding what are essentially low-note guitar parts on his bass here and there. But the big change, of course, is in the guitar sound. Betts plays some of Duane's parts on the familiar numbers of the repertoire (the band was also introducing material from its about-to-be-released album Eat a Peach), but he is reinventing himself as well as evoking his late partner in many of his solos, notably during the 21-and-a-half-minute "You Don't Love Me," when he really solos in the absolute sense -- everyone else lays out and lets him play by himself. At the same time, of course, when Betts is playing like Allman, no one is playing like Betts, and that is noticeable, for example, in "One Way Out," which is simply lacking its rhythm guitar part because there's nobody to play it. By early November 1972 (just prior to Oakley's fatal motorcycle accident), nine months and another 70 shows later, the Allmans would return to being a sextet with the addition of pianist Chuck Leavell. So, the quintet period is a short one in the band's history. On the basis of this recording, it can be judged as more than just a case of musicians bravely soldiering on; without Duane, they all have to work a little harder, and even if they're not the same, they demonstrate their right to keep calling themselves the Allman Brothers Band.

#16
The company's fourth album, takes a further leap by chronicling a show held after the death of bassist Berry Oakley and the reconfiguration of the band to include new bassist Lamar Williams and pianist Chuck Leavell. When the Allmans arrived at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on Long Island, NY, for two concerts in the spring of 1973, they were, as annotator John Lynskey notes, moving into larger venues to accommodate their much increased audience, playing two shows at a 15,000-seat sports arena rather than theater dates. Even as tragedy threatened to overcome it, the Allman Brothers Band had become a very successful act by 1973. In the midst of the turmoil, the group was also trying to finish a new album, and, indeed, singer/organist/guitarist Gregg Allman announced to the crowd that the LP, Brothers and Sisters, would be out in two weeks. (It actually appeared three months later.) In anticipation, the band played "Wasted Words," "Jessica," "Come & Go Blues," and "Ramblin' Man" from the forthcoming album during the first set. The obvious difference between this lineup and the previous ones was in the changed arrangements due to the different instrumentation. Leavell covered for Gregg Allman on keyboards when he picked up a guitar, as on "Wasted Words," but much of the time this version of the Allmans was a two-keyboard/one-guitar unit rather than the two-guitar/one-keyboard configuration of Duane Allman's time. That difference was particularly notable during the long jams on "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" at the end of the first set and in virtually the entirety of the second set, as lengthy performances of "Les Brers in A Minor," "Whipping Post," and "Mountain Jam" succeeded each other. Guitarist Dickey Betts had turned to slide work in emulation of Duane Allman, and he was highly proficient, but the twin-guitar lines of old were gone, and the improvisational sections took a jazzier turn. The Allman Brothers Band remained a formidable performing unit in 1973, but it was a less directed effort than it had been in the past.

#17
Any new music from the original lineup of the Allman Brothers Band is great to hear, and their new Archive Series CD, Boston Common 8/17/71, is one you will listen to often, from the first note to the last one! The band played in Boston many times in their early days, and it continues to be one of their favorite towns to perform in. The ABB truly reached their first big peak in 1971, and this single-disc CD showcases the music they presented on the stage each night they went out. Along with some cool samplings of their stage banter are amazing versions of "You Don't Love Me," "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed," and a riveting and unusual "Whipping Post" that ends the show.



Page - 7

[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 10984
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Registered: 5/24/2002
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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 04:51 PM
Various and Solo Works


Duane Allman
#1
Duane and Wilson Pickett

Duane Allman and Wilson Pickett - Hey Jude (Audio with Photos) - unstoppable3rd
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-dwSt2p0Gg
Working with Duane Allman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=st-0_4JWowA - (Audio with Photos) LuckieVideos
Duane Allman Herbie Mann - Push Push
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_5XZ8-ehs4 - unstoppable3rd
DUANE ALLMAN / HAPPILY MARRIED MAN (Audio with Photos) - hank2953
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncUG96ZFx7c
John Hammond/Duane Allman - "Shake for me"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg7DEZ3oYnQ (Audio with Photos) DirtyWhoer420

#2
Duane Allman's greatness was apparent on his recordings with the Allman Brothers, yet there was another side to the superb guitarist. For many years, he was a highly respected session musician, playing on cuts by Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, King Curtis, Boz Scaggs, Delaney & Bonnie, and Clarence Carter, among others. By including those session cuts, as well as a sampling of his brief sojourn in Eric Clapton's Derek and the Dominoes and a few rare solo tracks, along with a number of representative Allman Brothers songs, the double-album Anthology winds up drawing a complete portrait of Allman. He may have recorded plenty of other material worth hearing, but this has the bare essentials for an excellent introduction and retrospective.

#3
Anthology, Vol. 2 features a live cut by Delaney & Bonnie, plus a pair of what were then previously unissued Allman Brothers Band live tracks (among them "Midnight Rider" from the Fillmore East in June 1971). There's another good Duane Allman solo number and a good Hour Glass track ("Been Gone Too Long"), more session work with Aretha Franklin and King Curtis, Ronnie Hawkins ("Matchbox"), Wilson Pickett ("Born to Be Wild"), Johnny Jenkins, Boz Scaggs, Sam Samudio, and Otis Rush. Anyone who owns the first double-CD set will almost certainly have to own this one as well.

Gregg Allman
#4

Gregg Allman...I'm No Angel (Video) bellybutton4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ij8oQJVN5ZQ
Gregg Allman...Slip Away (Audio with Videos) MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo1gCBk0fd8
Gregg Allman & Cher / Can You Fool (Audio) hank2953
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3xFOUR3_UQ
"I always liked the above Gregg and Cher song" - OldDirtRoad
Gregg Allman...Hopelessly Miss You
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QS1bCWlNl9I (Audio) MYFREEBIRD
Gregg Allman - Oncoming Traffic (Audio) pipersofzion
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIlwnhORJck
Gregg Allman - Come And Go Blues (Rehearsal) audioglass
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T75YklbUXj8
Gregg Allman & Warren Haynes- All My Friends -3/28/07 - NYC - LazyLightning66
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE3OeI14kMk
Gregg Allman "Queen of Hearts" Birmingham Alabama - HDMAN100

#5
Recorded in the same year as the Brothers and Sisters album, this solo debut release is a beautiful amalgam of R&B, folk, and gospel sounds, with the best singing on any of Gregg Allman's solo releases. He covers his own "Midnight Rider" in a more mournful, dirge-like manner, and Jackson Browne's "These Days" gets its most touching and tragic-sounding rendition as well. Although Chuck Leavell and Jaimoe are here, there's very little that sounds like the Allman Brothers Band -- prominent guitars, apart from a few licks by Tommy Talton (Cowboy, ex-We the People), are overlooked in favor of gospel-tinged organ and choruses behind Allman's soulful singing.

#6
Gregg Allman's tour in support of his debut solo LP, Laid Back, led to the recording of this album (originally two LPs) at Carnegie Hall in New York and the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, NJ. It's a match for Laid Back in musical value and then some, with a good, wide range of repertory and great performances throughout by all concerned, plunging head-first and deep into blues, R&B, honky tonk, and gospel. Strangely enough, the album contains only three of Laid Back's songs -- "Don't Mess Up a Good Thing" opens the show in a properly spirited, earthy manner, but it's the second song, "Queen of Hearts," in a soaring rendition, with gorgeous backing by Annie Sutton, Erin Dickins, and Lynn Rubin, and superb sax work by Randall Bramblett and David Brown, that shows Allman in his glory as a singer and bandleader. Allman gives a lively, raucous, honky tonk-style rendition of the Elvis Presley hit "I Feel So Bad," complete with a killer guitar solo by Tommy Talton, and "Turn on Your Lovelight" gets an extended treatment worthy of the Allman Brothers Band. One would expect that, with Chuck Leavell and Jaimoe present in the band, there were be more similarity to the Allmans' sound, and that they'd be prominently featured, but Tommy Talton and bassist Kenny Tibbetts get more of a spotlight. Several Allman Brothers songs are present here, in more laid-back and lyrical versions, and the Capricorn Records band Cowboy -- essentially serving as the core of Allman's touring band -- gets a featured spot with two songs, "Time Will Take Us" and "Where Can You Go," that leave one wanting to hear a lot more concert material from them, and from Talton as a singer. The Gregg Allman Tour was reissued on CD in late 2001 in a clearer, sharper remastered edition that contains Martin Mull's complete introduction of the band.

#7
in a way, Playin' Up a Storm doesn't really highlight Gregg Allman's strengths, since it's a little smoother and soul-inflected than his work with the Allman Brothers. Then again, that's not a problem; after all, why make a solo album that's exactly like your full-time gig? Consequently, Playin' Up a Storm is a well-made, expertly performed set of blues-rock, soul-pop, and straight-ahead rock & roll. There aren't any true classics here, but the thing that makes it one of Allman's best solo efforts is the terrific performances. Not only is he in fine voice, delivering each song with conviction, but his supporting band -- featuring such luminaries as Dr. John and Bill Payne -- is sterling. All the grooves are in the pocket, the sound is enticing, and the overall effect is just right. Good stuff !

#8
Bought this when it first came out (on an album). It remains my favorite for all these years. The pop song, "I'm No Angel," prompted its purchase but it remains a classic to me because of its non-hits. Each song is my "favorite" until the next one plays. That being said, the song "Things That Might Have Been"--which contains my all-time favorite song phrase, "I could spend my life on a wonder..."--and "It's Not My Cross to Bear" are hypnotizing. They are so melodic and aurally rich. Jazzy, with some R&B and pop mixed in, this CD is really original. It borrows from many genres and comes up with its own very satisfying blend.This CD never gets stale.- An Amazon Review

#9
Nearly ten years separate Gregg Allman's third and fourth solo albums(not counting Allman & Woman). By 1986, he crafted I'm No Angel, an album designed to be a comeback. After all, the title track alone was a statement of purpose, a declaration of his bad-boy ways. Slick surfaces and keyboards dominate. On the title track, a song that justifiably became one of his signature tunes, it's a corker. I'm No Angel is, by and large, a solid and thoroughly enjoyable set of songs. A very solid release.

#10
Gregg Allman vocals are solid on all 13 tracks and he appears with a core band of Bill Stewart on drums, David Hood on bass, and Jack Pearson on dobro, slide and Acoustic guitars. There are also approximately 25 other musicians rotating in and out on various tracks bringing with them everything from a horn section to precussion instruments and cello. The CD is jumpstarted with a freshened up version of the Allman classic "whippin' post". All songs, with the possible exception of the country flavored "memphis in the meantime" are consistently good bluesy numbers with tight rhythms, generous leads and Allman's familiar smokey vocals. It is hard to imagine how a CD of this caliber can go relatively unnoticed. Highly recommended.- An Amazon Review

#11
There's no such thing as too much Gregg Allman. This 2 CD Set will not disappoint the Allman fan!! In fact, it is a must have!! The discs highlight Gregg's ability to take an audio sensation and turn it into a physical reaction. You feel the pain in the sound. I am an avid blues fan, and few, if any, elicit the response I feel when I listen to Gregg Allman. His vocal style is a window into his soul, and he's giving the listener a glimpse in. This set is a treasure with it's previously unreleased tracks and remastered tracks!

#12
If you like the Allman Brothers, then "The Best Of Gregg Allman" is a must have collection for any fan. The CD collects some real gems from his Epic records solo albums like "Just Before The Bullets Fly", "I'm No Angel" and "Searching For Simplicity". The smokey growl of Allman is in fine form on The rocking hit "I'm No Angel", "Slip Away", "Ocean Awash The Gunwale and "Brother To Brother". Three previously unreleased tracks are here as well. One can see that a lot of care and effort went into this CD package. Gregg allman is without a doubt one of the truly under appreciated blues singers of the rock era. Just keep in mind that this collection covers 1987 to present.

Dickey Betts
#13

Dickey Betts interview on Ramblin Man familiar70
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mk6zUz7dlNA
Dickey Betts - Interview - anodynefilms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJL493gm7Lo
Dickie Betts/Brian Setzer- Barbed Wire Fence (+4) joez116
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G05eifufACQ
Spirit - If I Miss This Train - 1978 (with Dickey Betts) stever1957
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpX34-eGcQg
Dickey Betts and Great Southern - Les Brers in A Minor - newbliss3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ps0UdogMVXI
DB & GS - Midnight Special - Southbound
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmN3cembTLg - sfz5
Dickey Betts "Statesboro Blues" monte403
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgLpiCjE03o
#14
After the runaway success of the Allman Brothers' classic Brothers and Sisters LP -- an album on which Dickey Betts virtually architected the open loping country sound with his newly found singing voice and easy, slimmed down guitar style -- the guitarist decided to try his hand at a solo album. Highway Call is, in essence, the second chapter in Betts finding his own voice as not only a singer, but also as a songwriter as well. At a brief half-hour in length, Highway Call is nonetheless an emotionally powerful slice of small country life offered with a vast emotional landscape. The tone is nostalgic in that each of the songs here reflects memory and the yearning for a simpler, less cluttered life lived in the open spaces, away from the chaotic roil of rock stardom and all of its trappings. Highway Call stands as the artist's finest solo moment, one that holds his true voice easily expressing itself far from the madding blues wail of the Allmans, deep in the center of a Georgia holler with the sun beating down on the peach trees or on the incessant babble of a backwoods creek calling his listeners to the mystery inherent in simple living and in playing honest, heartfelt music.

#15
Three years after the issue of his landmark solo recording, Highway Call , guitarist, singer, and songwriter Dickey Betts released the debut by his "other" band, Great Southern. Attempting to capture the loose, easy feel of Highway Call and combine it with the more blues-driven sound of the Allmans. The undertone of the album is the shuffle, both country and blues, aided in large part by Topper Price's harmonica and the able second guitar of Dan Toler. But the feel is all Betts. Great Southern is a very fine album that despite its polish holds a wealth of fine songs and truly astonishing playing within its grooves.

#16
On his third solo outing -- and his second with his backing band Great Southern -- Allman Brothers lead guitarist Dickey Betts moves back into the deep-fried Southern boogie that the Brothers are (in)famous for and serves it up with just a smidgen of country and comes out with another winner. Once again the mood is laid back and greasy with the guitars taking center stage in a funky, spunky mix that concentrates as much on the backbeat as it does on the swinging Southern boogie blues. There is no attempt to be "relevant" or "cutting edge." But there is no retro feel on this disc either; it sounds consistent with a man's vision who's always considered himself right on time and still does. Loud, tough, and funky, Atlanta's Burning Down is a winner.

#17
After a long layoff, Betts cut this blistering guitar rock album in a style strongly reminiscent of The Allman Brothers Band. In fact, his band contains pianist Johnny Neel and second guitarist Warren Haynes, both of whom would join the next edition of The Allmans when they re-formed; Allmans drummer Butch Trucks guests.

#18
Let's Get Together is a good-time, swinging, blues and New Orleans R&B-drenched romp through the roots of American music. Betts showcases his immense knowledge of American musical forms as this ten-minute instrumental courses through bop, gypsy swing, Brazilian samba, rock, blues, country, and jazz fusion, all of it done with taste and aplomb; Betts is too much of a musician to have to show off, and he has nothing whatsoever to prove. Though he hasn't done any solo records in a while, this cannot be considered Dickey Betts' comeback; he's simply stepped out on his own again and, in sharp contrast to other acts that are usually more than the sum of their parts, as a result of his split with the Allmans, listeners now have two fine acts to take pleasure in instead of just one.

#19
"Collectors # 1" is unlike anything Betts has attempted before. In this all acoustic outing, Betts has chosen to explore every genre he has contributed to over a forty year career. Betts is the only living musician who can handle blues , rock, country, jazz- and now Gaelic- and make it all his own. The return of Dan Toler is a welcome one and the guitar playing on this disc is first rate. All in all, a very good CD that will no doubt please fans of Dickey Betts and the Allman Brothers Band.

#20
This excellent compilation includes all the best of Dickey Betts' best work between the mid-seventies and late 1980's. The lone Allman Brothers Band track from 1973, "Ramblin' Man," was the band's biggest radio hit ever, penned and sung by Betts.There are four tracks from his debut solo album, "Highway Call", and a great live track with Betts joined by the Charlie Daniels Band andfriends during a Volunteer Jam. "Sweet Mama," written by Billy Joe Shaver rocks. There is also and live Betts track, "No Hard Times" that originally appeared on the Capricorn Records release "Hotel, Motels and Road Shows." Four tracks each from both of his Dickey Betts and Great Southern releases join two tracks from The Dickey Betts Band (featuring Warren Haynes and Matt Abts, later of Gov't Mule, and keyboard wiz Johnny Neel.)
It's a great collection that flows along with ease, showcasing all the various sides of Betts, from country to blues, jazz and even gospel. A fine tribute to "The Ramblin' Man."

#21
There is nothing new on this album at all but there are some very good versions of some classics - "Back where it all Begins"- and some rarer GS tracks like "Good Time Feeling". The real highlight however is the pure, clean country vocals of Dickey. Nobody can replicate it, it's totally unique, and it should be heard by all ABB and country fans.


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[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 05:06 PM
Various Side and Solo (Continued)


Warren Haynes( I have not included Gov't Mule here, there is a "Tribute" to them already on this site, by me)
#1
Dave Matthews Band feat Warren Haynes "Cortez The Killer" - CptAJ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITSUF7v2kJE
Warren Haynes, Joe Bonamassa, and Pat Travers - NAMM 2007 - RebelliousHutterite
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mF2vw9I-_wk
Warren Haynes plays the blues. - Sweeetloaf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iChAWaX5ZDo
Warren Haynes Band - Loaded Dice - Greyful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9tSxb0cTDM
Warren Haynes Band - Ain't Supertitious - Greyful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDMszPwwxSw

#2
Produced by Chuck Leavell, Warren Haynes' first solo album is a refreshing change of pace from his work with the latter-day incarnation of the Allman Brothers Band. Although the feel of this album is undeniably classic rock, with much of Free's bluesy swagger. The songs on this record are tight and concise, focusing on immediate riffs, gritty vocals, and cool arrangements to sell them. Haynes amply demonstrates why he is one of the most lauded straight-ahead rock lead guitarists of the '90s. Fans of Haynes' work with the Allman Brothers Band would surely be interested in this recording.

#3
With his ongoing membership in the Allman Brothers Band, Gov't Mule, Phil Lesh & Friends, and the Dead, guitarist/singer Warren Haynes doesn't really have time for a solo career. Yet while performing at the 2003 Bonnaroo Festival, he followed a Saturday night set with the Allman Brothers Band with a Sunday afternoon solo set, accompanying himself on acoustic and electric guitar, and here it is on CD. Haynes uses his guitar chording to support his soulful voice on what sounds like a personal choice set list.


Sea Level
#4

Fusion combo Sea Level was formed in 1976 by keyboardist Chuck Leavell, bassist Lamar Williams, and drummer Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson following their exit from the Allman Brothers Band; guitarist Jimmy Nalls completed the original lineup, which in 1977 issued its self-titled debut LP on the Capricorn label. Honing its distinctive marriage of rock, blues, and jazz through relentless touring, the group returned to the studio to cut 1978's Cats on the Coast, followed later that year by On the Edge; although Jaimoe returned to the Allmans, Sea Level recorded two more albums -- 1979's Long Walk on a Short Pier and 1980's Ball Room -- before dissolving.

#4
The debut album contains most of their best material, bright guitar, and keyboard-based instrumentals. Chuck Leavell shines on five of his tunes. Jimmy Nalls plays sweet guitar. Their first and best album. Some fine vocals, nicely crafted on "Nothing Matters but the Fever." With Chuck Leavell, Lamar Williams, and Jaimoe from the Allman Brothers, you know there was a lot of talent on board here. A really strong set of songs.

#5
Sea Level had an energy and a sound of its own; it was an Allman Brothers spinoff, but hardly an exact replica. The material on Sea Level's self-titled debut album of 1977 fell into two main categories -- vocal-oriented Southern pop/rock and instrumental jazz fusion -- and the same goes for its second album, Cats on the Coast. The vocal offerings (which include "That's Your Secret" and "Had to Fall") are pleasant, and fusion instrumentals like "Storm Warning," "Song for Amy," and "Midnight Pass" should appeal to anyone who spent a lot of time listening to Return to Forever, Larry Coryell, or John McLaughlin in the 1970s.

#6
By the time Sea Level recorded its third album, On the Edge, percussionist Jai Johanny Johanson had left the Georgia combo to return to the Allman Brothers. The music still fell into two main categories: vocal-oriented Southern pop/rock and instrumental jazz fusion.Most of the material is enjoyable, if less than mind-blowing. The best tracks made fans want to hang in there and keep supporting the band. "Fifty-Four" and "On the Wing" are engaging fusion instrumentals. Even though this LP is slightly uneven, it has more plusses than minuses and is worth having in your collection.

#7
Due to various complications between Sea Level and Capricorn Records, Long Walk on a Short Pier was never officially released in the U.S. -- it was only distributed as a promo before it was pulled from the schedule. It surfaced in Canada, but for many years, it was one of the rarest albums in their catalog. Capricorn reissued the album in 1998, fulfilling the desires of hardcore fans of the group. Their Southern rock-blues-jazz fusion had run out of steam by 1979, and while there are some good solos scattered throughout the album, only the devoted fan will want to search them out.

#8
The writing of Chuck Leavel combined with the talents of the band members makes this one of the best jazz/crossover groups of all time, from sounding like the Allman Brothers for 16 bars than drifting back into Chuck's intricate jazz melodies is a thing of beauty, if you like melodies over melodies played with prescision and beauty this is the band for you.

The Derek Trucks Band
#9
The Derek Trucks Band-I'd Rather Be Blind, Crippled And Crazy - sonybmg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBDkFcwmAuY
The Derek Trucks Band-Crow Jane - sonybmg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eC01c7VuYjM
Derek Trucks Band & Susan Tedeschi -- "Little by Little" (film clears up before song starts)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjSXjpyiYKg
Derek Trucks Band: "Good Morning Little School Girl" cleantones
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GN5cvrDtv3M
Johnny Winter & Derek Trucks Band -- Highway 61 (Crossroads) vicioustruth
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp7BrzrfJMM

#10
Derek Trucks began building his own legacy at the age of 12, playing scorching slide guitar that prompted many to hypothesize that he was the reincarnation of Duane Allman in the flesh. The nephew of Allman Brothers Band drummer Butch Trucks, Derek was virtually born into a show business family, but don't think for a minute that he doesn't create his own opportunity. Backed by a skin-tight rhythm section and complimented by a top-notch organist, the youthful guitarist blazes through new arrangements of jazz and blues classics. He turns the trumpet wizardry of Miles Davis into slide-guitar magic, and his readings of a couple of Coltrane tunes pack a terrific punch. The band also contribute several of their own compositions, paving the way for a bright future as a group of tight-knit, talented musicians. A flawless recording.

#11
Whereas guitar phenom Trucks' first album was of the improvisational sort to the highest degree, fusing Coltrane and Sun Ra to Hendrix, this second effort (his first for the House of Blues imprint) puts his playing and music more firmly in Southern American roots music territory. With guest shots from Warren Haynes ("Good Morning Little Schoolgirl," "Fourty-Four" and "Death Letter"), Larry McCray ("Ain't That Lovin' You"), Matt Tutor (vocals on "Preachin' Blues" and "Alright") and Jimmy Herring, there's more of a jam session feeling to this disc than that of a cohesive album. All in all, a young artist still showing promise.


#12
For his first solo project after replacing Dickie Betts in the Allman Brothers Band, 23-year-old Derek Trucks pushes the stylistic envelope even further than on his last diverse release. Prodding into Latin, Indian, and fusion jazz, this stylistically varied effort exudes enough blues and funky R&B to keep the Allman Brothers Band fan's attention while expanding their boundaries. Trucks' playing is edgy, electric, and distinctive throughout, with his slide work not surprisingly reminiscent of Duane Allman at times. Joyful Noise is a powerful, uncompromising statement. Derek Trucks shows he is a remarkably talented young guitarist who refuses to be stylistically pigeonholed by the history of the legendary band he joined.

#13
Though recorded nearly two years before the release of the Derek Trucks Band's previous album, Soul Serenade feels like a step forward from Joyful Noise in its maturity and focus. By almost any measure, this is a jazz album; the only references to rock can be heard in the overdriven tone and bluesy slide phrasing that Trucks consistently employs. The prominence of the Hammond organ, and in particular its registration and abundant Leslie tremolo, also nods transparently toward the leader's apprenticeship in the Allman Brothers Band. The rhythm feel is subtle, though, with an understated swing that borrows from this or that corner of world music but unmistakably centers itself on jazz practice.. One track, the Gregg Allman vocal cameo, a full-blooded rendition of "Drown in My Own Tears" that features brisk back-and-forth between the singer and Trucks, sinks from the jazz embrace and into the bosom of the blues; another, "Sierra Leone," builds a musical bridge from the Missisippi Delta back to Africa, in resonant acoustic timbres. In this context, these two moments only enrich the spectrum of Soul Serenade without at all detracting from the integrity and maturity of Trucks's vision.

#14
Derek Trucks is a world-class slide guitarist, still only 24 at the time of this recording. Most know him as a guitarist with the Allman Brothers Band. But here, with a smoking group of collaborators, he plays an incendiary, soulful, and wildly adventurous set that challenges all the accepted rock paradigms. This is the record to turn the heads of those who haven't gotten hip to Trucks' bottleneck magic. This performance is so inspired, so utterly spellbinding, it transcends the genre classifications it employs to get the music across. The jamming is tight and full of surprises, and there is no aimless guitar wankery. This is a band that plays like a single, flowing unit, where nuance, dynamic, and intuition are the order of the evening and the modus operandi for encountering and relaying this information to an audience. This is the right time for the Derek Trucks Band to issue a concert recording. The truth remains, however, that any way you cut it, this is a live album for the ages.

#15
This is, perhaps, the one. Derek Trucks has been on an aesthetic quest for something since he began his own recording career in 1997 -- apart from his membership in the Allman Brothers Band. Each record has gone further into establishing Trucks not only as a slide guitar wizard , but also as a serious songwriter, fine arranger, and bandleader. The Derek Trucks Band, as evidenced by the release of 2003's Soul Serenade, is a unit -- a band -- whose core has been together for eight years. They create an atmosphere, a sound, a musical sense of place and community. There are no tracks here that give way to loose jamming; these are songs. In fact, it was carefully crafted and executed. But the rawness, the energy, and the unpredictable musicality are everywhere present. Songlines is the finest moment in the Derek Trucks Band's recording career. It's a fully mature, deeply reckoned studio album that bears repeated listening to reveal all its subtlety and the beauty of its creation.


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[Edited on 2/5/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 05:06 PM
#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12
Gregg and Red Dog - ABB Farm, 1973

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

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[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/7/2008 at 05:07 PM
#1
Dickie & Berry - 12/31/71

#2

#3


#4
#5

#6

#7

#8

#9
Gregg and Mom / 1974

#10


#11

#12
Red Dog, Tuffy, & Twiggs-Allman Brothers Farm, '73

From Terry Jones Rogers Website
#13

#14
L-R Dave "Trash" Cole, Twiggs Lyndon, Red Dog, Virginia Speed, Buddy Thornton, Michael Artz


Grinderswitch :L-R Rick Burnette, Larry Howard, Dru Lumbar, Joe Dan Petty





Page - 11







[Edited on 2/9/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:13 AM
#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8


#9
#10

#11

#12
Wilson "the Wicked" Pickett at FAME Recording Studios at the sessions for "Mustang Sally"



Below is a link that I could not take pictures from, but it has some great photos from the old Piedmont Park days

http://projects.accessatlanta.com/gallery/view/music/0908allmanpark/



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[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:16 AM


The Following Photos are From Florida Cracker - A Southern Woman on the Net Site. One of the best personal web sites I have ever seen. Not only for ABB band related topics, but for all kinds of news...celebrity, music, world, Satewide, you name it, she's got it. If you get a chance please visit her site, you will not regret it. I don't know if she is a member here or not. But she should be. What a treasure of ABB/Duane era photos she has. I hope she does not mind me including them in this tribute(I tried to find a way to contact her). I think these photo's are going to be the highlight of these threads. Any of you that are responsible for her getting any of these photos, please post and take credit. These are some truly awesome pictures and a pleasure to see.These Photos feature the Duane era.

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7
This poster for one of Duane's last shows has the strangest drawing of Duane I've seen thus far.
What is that they have him wearing? A barber's bib? Oh, no! Not the 'chops! - Flordia Cracker

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12
Duane and... a Brylcreemed Dickey(?) just can't hide from the bass.

#13

#14

#15

Page -13

[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:16 AM

Photo's from Florida Crackers (A Southern Woman on the net) site. (Continued)


#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8
Thom and Duane at Chapel Hill.

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13
(1st Grade Palmer School on Leake Ave near Belle Meade Mansion. Duane is on first row seated center.

#14
2nd Grade same school.Duane is seated 2nd from right.

#15
(3rd Grade same school. Duane is again seated 3rd from the left.

#16

#17

#18

#19

#20

#21

#22
Aretha Franklin sessions.

#23
Ronnie Hawkins and Duane

#24

#25

#26


Page - 14

[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:17 AM
Photo's from Florida Crackers (A Southern Woman on the net) site. Continued

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11
Gregg and Duane

#12

#13
Duane and Aretha

#14
Duane at the Dentist

#15

#16
Eric Clapton,Carl Radle and Duane

#17
J.Geils and Duane

#18

#19

#20
Duane and J. Geils

#21

#22

#23

#24


Page - 15



[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:17 AM
Photo's from Florida Crackers (A Southern Woman on the web net) site.(Continued)

#1

#2

#3
Second row from top, all the way to the right Duane. Third row from the top, two from the left Gregg.

#4
John Hammond and Duane

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9
Duane with Derek and the Dominoes

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17
Bonnie, Delaney and Duane.

#18

#19
Duane and Dickey


#20

#21

#22

#23
Duane


#24
Brother Duane R.I.P.

"God Bless you Brother Duane.You are loved and missed by Lord knows how many Family members, friends and fans. You were truly a treasure for us all during your short stay on this earth. The music you gave us lives on in our hearts and souls forever. You were a musical genius that left one of the greatest marks on the music scene ever. Even today you touch our hearts and ears with your magical sound. We still shed tears for you and Berry, Dear Brother. You are a legend among legends. We love you forever, and wait to see you play in that great concert hall in the sky."


Page - 16




[Edited on 1/30/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:17 AM

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano











Goodbye to the Dickey era of the ABB - We love you Brother Dickey !!!!


THE CURRENT ERA OF THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND !!!!!!!!!!!




























The Allman Brothers Band – Photo by Grant Ness














Johnny Winter at the Beacon with the ABB.












Page - 17

[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:17 AM





Jaimoe, Chuck Leavell, Gregg and Butch


Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by Mike D'Ariano

Photo by DanCipriano


Photo by DanCipriano

Photo by DanCipriano


Derek and Peter Frampton Photo by Dino Perrucci












Devon Allman – Photo by Jenn Lutke
Honeytribe "One Way Out" Part 1 - sekrph
Honeytribe "One Way Out" Part 2 - sekrph
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3vrc25Y48w



Susan Tedeschi – Photo by Jenn Lutke
Susan Tedeschi~(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean - susea
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_3BFGyztNM


Vaylor Trucks – Bonobos Convergence
Bonobos Convergence - "Home on Derange"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iumX8jKZqO0


The Happy Couple
Derek Trucks Band & Susan Tedeschi -- Little by Little - vicioustruth
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjSXjpyiYKg


Allman Brother for a day "Zakk goes Wylde"
Zakk Wylde's Black Label Society - In This River Live Part 1 (for Dimebag )
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7kwjE5nJDY&feature=related
Zakk Wylde's Black Label Society - In This River Live Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40PySmErNq0&feature=related


Page - 18







[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:17 AM
Allman Brothers Band - Duane Allman era



TheAllman Brothers "Dreams" (Fillmore East 1970) - MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txm2UQeYiss

Allman Brothers Band - "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" 1970's - starrlyte420
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75km7FZvQAg

Allman Brothers Band "Ain't Wastin Time No More" from early 70's - craigtheairplaneman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnuCWlIVhSw

Allman Brothers Band - "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" 70's -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aaR9Vv4zTY

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festival Part 1 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3VCf1dvq0&feature=related

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festival Part 2 -Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLj4F4-PuY8

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festival Part 3 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkS45MBu8s8&feature=related

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festival Part 4 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YutLfKlyag&feature=related

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festiva Part 5l - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AC7BARmHCc&feature=related

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Fastival Part 6 -Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMDnp4BD1e0&feature=related

The Allmans Brothers Band 7-17-70 Love Valley Festival Part 7 - Scotia Dave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KXDmufVMEM&feature=related



Allman Brothers 1972

Allman Brothers "In Concert" 11-2-72 part 1 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsJQHOQD5lc

Allman Brothers "In Concert" 11-2-72 part 2 - Scotaidave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8HTBeFVUbI

Allman Brothers "In Concert" 11-2-72 part 3 -Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zsI7_Epq_U


Music from the Chuck Leavell, Lamar Williams era

The Allman Brothers Band 1973 Sat Night In Macon Part 1 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtMjP4xeqpg&feature=related

The Allman Brothers Band 1973 Sat Night In Macon Part 2 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9nu2IMVOW0

The Allman Brothers Band 1973 Sat Night In Macon Part 3 - Scotiadave
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEfRrM6hyAk&feature=related

The Allman Brothers Band - Done Somebody Wrong - hoooley1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6kwuM8N8vU

Allman Brothers Band "Midnight Rider" September 73 Macon, GA - craigtheairplaneman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Wylf60h_9k

The Allman Brothers Band - Ramblin' Man, Sep '73 - sassafraser
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE5OwqF1lNU


Music from the Dan and Frankie Toler, Rook, Lawler era

The Allman Brothers Band - "You Don't Love Me" - Gainesville, Florida 1982. - lgtmelo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrBxbMGqWEs

Allman Brothers Band "Ramblin' Man" 1982 - thirdwatchFAITH
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WGVW7byRCA

Allman Brothers "You Don't Love Me" 1982 - MYFRREBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dp8OqmtB90

Allman Brothers "Can't Take it with you" 1982 - MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuZCi5sbSzc
The Allman Brothers Band : "Whipping Post" - Gainesville Fla. 1982 -

The Allman Brothers Band: "Jessica" - Gainseville Fal. 1982 - dullsville
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaBm4ej-1vg

The Allman Brothers Band "Blue Sky" Gainesville Fla. 1982 - MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fFDV_SZ7N4

Allman Brothers "In memory of Elizabeth Reed" 1982 - MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxQPzKEK1yY

Allman Brothers - "Midnight Rider" - astralasia23
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqCc1l_v_uI

Allman Brothers - Hotel Room Jam 1982 - audioglass
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMfTD8ja2UQ


Page - 19




[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:18 AM
The Allman Brothers Band...."Statesboro Blues" Reunion Tour Rehearsa Videol - 1989
MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=708C6rwqmVw

The Concert footage for 10/26/91 is a little grainy, but the show and sound is very good. If you set the picture on Youtube to the smallest setting, the picture is much clearer. Thanks to Scotiadave for putting it on there. Enjoy

Allman Brothers Band 10/26/91 :Walnut Creek Amphitheatre ,Raleigh, North Carolina

"Youtube Videos by Scotiadave"

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 1 -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3muucfrz2FM

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjkSVOvrY_I

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoXYgirthCs

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G339M3XUdAY

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 6
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJ9elE-GhOU

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfdD_v_tD9Y

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 9
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ymqd_jeg8E8

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 10
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yN6dCMW8sU

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxPU4uV43tM

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlrOXl77058

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97znd_Xn5o0

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 15
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lh7fqpmsGQs

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 16
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uYbkStK4qI

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 17
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnuuNwAc4Kc

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 19
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTInrmxkvlQ

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 20
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9WQiZkK_b8

Allman Brothers 10-26-91 part 21
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIe2UwvHEEs

11-1-95 :Another Great show from the Dickey era, good film quality, great sound. Once again Thanks to scotiadave for the Youtube up load. "This one is Dedicated to "Rainy" " Because Dickey's on fire for this one


The Allman Brothers Band : Austin City Limits, Austin Texas 11/1/95

"Youtube Videos by Scotiadave"

Set List
1. Don't Want You No More
2. It's Not My Cross To Bear
3. Ain't Wastin' Time No More
4. Sailin' 'Cross The Devil's Sea
5. Ramblin' Man
6. Midnight Rider
7. The Same Thing
w/Matt Abts
8. Blue Sky
9. End Of The Line
10. Back Where It All Begins
11. No One To Run With
12. One Way Out

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1_hTmPOwPE

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxWnHkYboSA

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3HO1qzjDlA

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhT_0GDAk4k

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu6LpwPMv3Q

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 6
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5QK94K_pJg

The Allman Brothers 11-1-95 part 7
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PA2bbeDUYi0

Various Other Clips from The 90's


The Allman Brothers Band "Blue Sky" (Germany 1991) - jat13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1jpQu6qR1E

The Allman Brothers Band "End of the line" (Germany 1991) - jat13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FCQwv82FV8

The Allman Brothers Band "Seven Turns" Video - sonybmg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TdxqhOiHUE

The Allman Brothers Band "Good Clean Fun" Video - sonybmg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqAByBui7bg

The Allman Brothers Band - "You Don't Love Me" (On David Letterman) - lgtmelo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMAHQAtUB58

"Dedicted to Greggswoman"
The Allman Brothers Band - "Melissa" July 23rd, 1992 - anodynefilms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzwMLQi-caU

"Blue Sky versions Dedicated to Rainy"
The Allman Brothers Band - "Blue Sky" July 23rd, 1992 - anodynefilms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIr2ZIaFV30

The Allman Brothers Band "Blue Sky" Jones Beach 08/31/90 - stealyourboognish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88PDewk6IiY

The Allman Brothers "Blue Sky" Concert for the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame - mosriste
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNoRtL5MWZU

The Allman Brothers Band "Blue Sky" Jones Beach 08/31/90 - stealyourboognish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88PDewk6IiY

The Allman Brothers Band - One Way Out - Jones Beach 8-31-90 pt. 1 - stealyourboognish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kg4E9zY2k-M&feature=related

The Allman Brothers Band - One Way Out - Jones Beach 8-31-90 pt. 2 - stealyourboognish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_-pDnlf_W4

The Allman Brothers Band "Midnight Rider" - Rock N Roll Hall of Fame - stephmarie79
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66acq5ZJFzQ

The Allman Brothers Band "Gambler's Roll", Roskilde Festival, Denmark, June 27th, 1991 - davidaron
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blCCxsvmUYs

The Allman Brothers Band "Get on with your Life" Capitol Theatre 1991 - ripa170
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYuwr3tNXaM

The Allman Brothers Band "Statesboro Blues" Live at Great Woods - MYFREEBIRD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAx8RYSnj50



Page 20






[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 1/13/2008 at 11:18 AM
The Wanee show below is a very good example of how great this band still is, how todays version of the band can hold their heads high with pride for the the excellent music they still give us. Washed up band on the oldies circuit, no way in hell, Legends in their own time..Hell Yeah !!!


Wanee April 14th 2006

Videos by jcrow28

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 1 - jcrow28
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-tduI1LSnY

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1h2RD26i0V4

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAga3_TtI44

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZxRvnhz5Dc

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4kHJHtE5RE

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 6
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LA4tyMD1RqU

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 7
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNKrZbqhxBA

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4T3ur-dX3YA

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee - April 14th, 2006: Part 9
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8rYvQ5xUNA

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 10
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w8YrCxddcI

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 11
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ce3hvIfsoD0

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkWL-HHcae4

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrTFq0D0Hvk

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYW64Q4wico

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 15
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q9LIvcywy0

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 16
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m5qnQsgA3M

Allman Brothers Band Live @ Wanee April 14th, 2006: Part 17
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QH-cQHHJM0


Various videos from the current Allman Brothers Band

A lot of youtube content for the current ABB has been shot with cellphones or shaky camcordera and has poor sound. Also a lot are just short clips, not the whole song. So I left them out. Also I thought that I had found some great stuff until I realized it was the Beacon 2003 DVD. I removed it from here. The Wanne stuff above alone is a great representation of the Band.

The Allman Brothers Band "Whipping Post" partial Boston 8/7/07 - denverrose420
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzb-Y-huYMg

The Allman Brothers Band "Southboud" partial / Peter Frampton/ Asbury Jukes Horns - easygoer13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1XXI9KOLeA

Allman Brothers Band - Don't Keep Me Wondering TV 2005 - rhythmstick
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3ScV6NZo1c

The Allman Brothers Band "Leave my Blues at Home" Rosemont Theatre in Chicago
jgerlach777
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LO-mDUMReFY

The Allman Brothers Band " And it stoned me" Allman Brothers Band 4/6/07 Angelini5120
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1a1qYMG-08

The Allman Brothers Band w/ Luther Dickinson "One Way Out" 8/3/07 - VTJAFO
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doXmMUVy4JM

The Allman Brothers Band: Melissa (live 2007) - easygoer13
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVzKbwA2h2U

The Allman Brothers Band 5/4/07 Memphis - " The Night they drove ole Dixie down " (Partial)
entropy4205
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dju6aM8hPsw

Various fan Tributes and Montage's from youTube

The Allman Bros With Duane Allman - Denza
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkgwnbfNHjA

The Allman Brothers Band - Montage / Homage - billstoll
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS6tU1o0nJ8

The Allman Brothers Band ( Tribute ) From a Fan - unscrupulousrane07
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgQ9pl9n_js


I hope you all enjoy this, I tried to make it as good as possible. I love the Allman Brothers and I always will. They are part of my life. They take me on a wondeful trip down memory lane and the trip is still going on.

This Tribute is Dedicated to the Allman Brothers Band and Crew, Lana,Rowland, All the Forum, Guest book folks and ABB fans everywhere.

I love you my Brothers and Sisters. Peace and Love to you all.




Kenny

Duane Allman Tribute "Little Martha"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmSPCOby-1A

The Road goes on forever.................................................

Page 21



[Edited on 2/8/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 2/8/2008 at 05:00 PM
PLEASE DO NOT POST ANY MORE PHOTOS TO THIS THREAD AT THE PRESENT TIME. THERE IS A LOT OF CONTENT ALREADY AND IT TAKES A WHILE TO LOAD. WE WILL WORK ON THAT AT A LATER DATE.

***************************************************************

I think that as part of this thread we should each tell a little how we discovered the Allman Brothers Band's music and what it has meant to our musical lives. Let them know just how much we love them and their music.

"I had heard some of the Allman Brothers music from some of the older "Freaks" that lived in our neighborhood, but I guess the first album that turned me on to the them was Duane Allman's "Anthology" I was 16. I remember I had two of those "Color organs" that hooked up to my stereo, they had different colored lights that flashed to the sound of the music. I would put both LP's of "Anthology" on the record player, lay back, burn one, then watch and listen to the music. I loved that record...all of it, especially the Allman Brothers songs(Dream's most of all). "Going down slow", "Loan Me a Dime", "Rollin' Stone", Down Along the Cove,"Please Be With Me", "Layla" and "Mean Old World" were the other ones I played most. "Stand Back" and "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" also caught my ear. Great songs.

I was working at a dept store called "Treasure Island". I was a buggy boy, pushing those shopping carts in during the cold month of December. I purchased "Beginnings" and after that I was hooked for life.

I had a little cheap cassette player(mono) that I would tape music from the radio. I set a 60 minute tape to record of off WRAS (Ga. State radio station). Some older friends of mine were driving to Tennessee to go camping for the weekend. Since I was younger, I had to beg my Mom to let me go with a bunch of hippies to the Mountains.

When we got there, folks were partying at a big lake that had cliffs around it that people would dive from. There must have been 50 people, hippies, older folks, kids, you name it. We all partied all day. Then night came and everyone was talking about how they liked to camp there and get high. We were all wasted, it was late. I got out the old cassette player and hooked one big speaker up to it. Then I put in the tape I had recorded, keep in mind I had not listened to it yet.

Well it turned out that what was on it was most of "Live at the Fillmore East". I had never heard "You don't love me" and I do not think most of the folks there had either. When it came on we all went nuts over this great long song with all the killer guitar work. Everyone was boogying their a$$e$ off. Going "Wow man...who in the hell is that".

I partied until I passed out, got up in the morning...hung over and there was folks sleeping on the ground everywhere. As soon as we got to Atlanta I bought "LATFE". My love for the band grew stronger. Duane became my favorite guitar player and Gregg my favorite singer. Duane's guitar was as if it was plugged into his heart and soul. So much feeling. Gregg's voice roared with the aches and pains of love and life. Berry's bass lines thundering with the music and a pair of drummers who sounded like a freight train rollin' down the tracks.

By the time I really got into the band, Duane had already died. I remember the older long hairs at school talking about it. They were sad. I also remember these two old Rednecks on my street...older men in their 40's. They were talking about that "Long haired hippy that had gotten killed on that motorcyle"..that he was "Probably on some kind of dope". It pissed me off so bad.

At one time I thought there was 3 Allman Brothers in the band, but the third one turned out to be Mark Almond(not the one from Soft Cell..lol). Somebody had told me he was the 3rd brother. So being a little "stoner" dude I ran out and bought a Mark Almond record, expecting it to be like the ABB. I was not even thinking of the Allman/Almond spelling of the names...what an idiot. The first time I saw them was the Lamar Williams/Chuck Leavell era. Later I would get into Sea Level also. I have seen the band many times since.


After that I eagerly awaited every Allman Brothers release. "Brother and Sisters, "Win lose or Draw" and the rest. I even liked the "Arista' albums and bought them right as soon as they came out, like I have any Allman Brother release. I remember waiting so long for "Enlightened Rogues" to come out" I loved it.

Again there was no new music, but all the old music never got tiresome. Especially the first two, Eat a Peach and LATFE.

When "Seven Turns" came out I was all over it. Had no Idea who Warren Haynes or Allen Wood was. Of course I got it the day it came out. They sounded fresh and as good as ever.

I have always gotten their music the day it came out at the store. Waited a long time for "Hittin the Note" and I loved it also. I hope one day soon they will grace us with at least one more studio release...or 2 or 3 more.

Their music has always touched my heart, Duane and Derek's slide playing can bring tears to my eyes and has many times. It's the feeling, you know what I mean. Gregg has always been in my top 5 vocalist, when he was not number one.

I want to take this time to say "THANK YOU" to the Allman Brothers Band...for being so much of my musical life. The greatest band to ever come from the USA, and one of the greatest of all time. All of your songs are part of certain era's of my life and will be until i'm here no more. Hopefully then I will be in Heaven listening to Duane and Berry playing live for the first time. I love you guys, your music will always be a special part of me".

The Allman Brothers are on of the few bands that I never get tired of or bored with. I can still put in the first two and get those same feeling I got back at that old Dept store when I bought "Beginnings". LATFE never gests old, only better with time.

Thank you from my musical heart and soul,
Kenny




PLEASE DO NOT POST ANY MORE PHOTOS TO THIS THREAD AT THE PRESENT TIME. THERE IS A LOT OF CONTENT ALREADY AND IT TAKES A WHILE TO LOAD. WE WILL WORK ON THAT AT A LATER DATE.


I'm sure there is some errors within these 21 pages. I will try to keep it corrected and in good order for us to enjoy and to add to.

 

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  posted on 2/8/2008 at 06:40 PM

Of the 1,233 views, at least 1,190 was my editing..LOL

One page at a time, then start over....over and over. I thought I would finish in an hour today...took me 5.

Supposed to be at my Aunts next week, No PC. So I wanted to finish today.

 

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  posted on 2/9/2008 at 08:42 AM
One of my faves is page 11, picture 12.


Twiggs looks cool, like a Cowboy.


Twiggs Defense

One night in the 1970s, the Allman Brothers arrived at a club in Buffalo, New York to play a gig. They were fifteen minutes late.

When the club's owner refused to pay them, a roadie named Twiggs Lyndon stabbed him three times with a fishing knife. The man died of his injuries and Lyndon was arrested and charged with first-degree murder.

At the ensuing trial, Lyndon's lawyers argued that he had been temporarily insane at the time of the incident; touring with the Allman Brothers, they declared, would drive anyone insane.

Bassist Berry Oakley was called to the stand and, though he was barely coherent and had to run to the bathroom several times to vomit, he did manage to answer a few questions:

"Did you take any dope in the last month?"
"Uh-huh."
"In the last week?"
"Oh yeah."
"What about the last hour?"
"You bet."

Incredibly, Lyndon was acquitted.

-Gregg Allman



On Page 11...I just added pictures #13,#14,#15. from Terry Jones Rogers Website.


[Edited on 2/9/2008 by OldDirtRoad]

 

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  posted on 2/9/2008 at 02:28 PM

 

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