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Author: Subject: Farm Aid in NYC

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 07:17 AM
New York City to Host Farm Aid
Jun 11, 5:13 PM EST


The Associated Press

NEW YORK -- The Farm Aid benefit concert is planting itself in New York City later this year, organizers said Monday.

The show will be held at Randalls Island on September 9.

Farm Aid co-founders Willie Nelson and John Mellencamp made the announcement with Mayor Michael Bloomberg at Union Square, which has a renowned fresh-produce market. The trio took a quick walk through one of the booths and munched snap peas for the cameras before holding a news conference about this year's concert.

The lineup will include Nelson, Mellencamp, Neil Young and Dave Matthews.

Farm Aid concerts have been raising money for farmers since 1985. The organization's mission includes supporting family farms, changing the system of industrial agriculture, advocating fair prices and encouraging people to buy locally grown food that is organic and humanely produced.

It has raised more than $30 million since it began. Last year's concert was in Camden, N.J., and the year before was in Chicago.

"We're so happy that y'all have invited us, Farm Aid, to New York City," Nelson said. "More people eat probably around here than anywhere in the world."

Ticketmaster will begin selling tickets Saturday at 10 a.m.


 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 07:40 AM
Yeah, New York City is known worldwide for all of it's family farms.

You'd think it'd be held in upstate NY or somewhere where there is actually some farm land.

 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 07:45 AM
Hell, if they can have it in Camden they can have it anywhere

Mellencamp alone may be enough to get me there

 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 08:36 AM
Willie is coming to NYC to harvest money my friends.
 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 08:41 AM
Any Mule for this year's gig?
 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 08:44 AM
If playing this in NYC and other "urban" locations makes more money for the farmers, then I am all for it.

 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 10:56 AM
Actually, NYS has many, many family farms both upstate (which is a rather large area of land) and in Long Island. Of course they are always threatened by land development because of people's constant need for bigger and bigger houses, especially in Long Island.

Does anyone know if there is parking at Randall's Island?

Last year Mule was not announced until very late in the game.

BTW, Last year Mellencamp was terrific as was Steve Earl and of course my favorite, Neil Young. That was the highlight for me. To see Neil Young. He is my most favorite song wriiter and it was a real thrill to see him up close. I ended up buying a ticket from someone who upped the price a few times , but it was so worth it. And of course, Mule rocked. It was a very special event. I also enjoyed Dave's solo set.

I'm gonna buy a ticket (if it is a decent seat) and then if Mule doesn't perform, I will evaluate the rest of the line up, but really, it was a terrific day of music last year. Also, if you buy a ticket and don't use it, you can always sell it MFG. Just saying.

 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 10:58 AM
I attended the Farm Aid that was in Pittsburgh a few years back and it was a blast!!!! Have fun everyone and don't forget to pre-party at McSorley's
 

True Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 11:27 AM
didn't ABB do farm aid in like 95 or 96 or so???

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 01:23 PM
quote:
Yeah, New York City is known worldwide for all of it's family farms.

You'd think it'd be held in upstate NY or somewhere where there is actually some farm land.


That's exactly what I was thinking. Randall's Island is a crummy venue and a pain in the butt to get in and out of. I would have thought about going if it were somewhere upstate.

Pete

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 01:44 PM
I went to Farm Aid IV at Indianapolis in 1990. It was a great experience. Among the many artists on the bill that year was Guns~n~Roses, Kentucky Headhunters, Elton John made a surprise appearance, and there were a ton of up and coming country artists who played, like Garth Brooks and Alan Jackson. That's when "New Country" was just breaking big. It was a great show and a great cause.

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 02:16 PM
I will be there - I heard about this a few months ago as a rumor and was hoping it was true.

Dave + Neil = GOLD

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 02:38 PM
quote:
Hell, if they can have it in Camden they can have it anywhere



hey man there is plenty of crack farming going on there! but seriously Jersey is the Garden State and within ten +/- miles of Camden there are some lovely farms.

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 05:20 PM
Just one interesting thing - before I posted, it said that the last post in this thread was by Kreedham when it was by Linnie, anyone else notice that or wonder what's up?

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 05:20 PM
quote:
I went to Farm Aid IV at Indianapolis in 1990. It was a great experience. Among the many artists on the bill that year was Guns~n~Roses, Kentucky Headhunters, Elton John made a surprise appearance, and there were a ton of up and coming country artists who played, like Garth Brooks and Alan Jackson. That's when "New Country" was just breaking big. It was a great show and a great cause.



I loved when Iggy did " I Wanna be Your Dog" for all the farmers

Steven Addler plowin' head first into his kit when GNR took the stage

Plus getting to see Big Mon

Only bad thing is I did'nt know big dave then or we could of had a cold one or 2 or 3

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 05:37 PM
quote:
Yeah, New York City is known worldwide for all of it's family farms.

You'd think it'd be held in upstate NY or somewhere where there is actually some farm land.


Brother Dave, you know we think alike when it comes to farms and the countryside and getting off the hard road, but I think this is actually a good thing. NYC is the media capital of the world, and everyone in NYC eats food. They need to be reminded of where it comes from, and what it takes to grow it, and how important family farms are to the mix and the true American ethos. My brother's girlfriend, for instance, who was raised on Long Island, when I first met her a few years ago she had never seen a full-blown corn field. I tried to get her to walk out into the middle of one, but she was freaked.

However, even in NYC, there are growers;

quote:
Monday June 4, 2007
Students plant seeds of change
Garden taking root near Columbus School


D.J. Empet, 12, plants vegetables in a community garden near Columbus Park in Binghamton. He and his classmates at nearby Columbus School read a book on how a community garden revived a neighborhood in Cleveland, and they are applying it to Binghamton.

WAYNE HANSEN / Press & Sun-Bulletin


Related material:
Binghamton community garden takes root


By George Basler
Press & Sun-Bulletin

BINGHAMTON -- James Grayson is a self-described "city kid" who's only seen tomatoes and cucumbers in a supermarket.

But the past month or so, the 12-year-old city resident has been getting his hands dirty as he helps convert a vacant, litter-filled lot in downtown Binghamton into a community vegetable garden.

His voice has a sense of pride as he talks about the work. "This place used to be really bad with weeds, glass and graffiti," he said.

The garden, on a 125-by-34-foot plot next to Columbus Park, is the joint effort of three classes at the Columbus Learning Center, 164 Hawley St., and Paul Harger, a community gardener who envisions creating small gardens throughout the city.

Harger sees the garden as a step toward bringing some pride to the struggling downtown neighborhood. "This can show how we can take an area that's in really sad shape and bring the community together," he said.

The idea originated with Jocelyne Jesenof, who teaches a fifth- and sixth-grade class at the center, which is run by the Broome-Tioga Board of Cooperative Educational Services for students who have been removed from their home schools because of discipline or other problems.

Here, students read a book entitled "Seedfolks" by Paul Fleishman that tells the story of how a community garden transformed a Cleveland neighborhood, crossing barriers of age, ethnicity and backgrounds.

The students liked the book, and Jesenof thought, "This would be a wonderful opportunity for our kids." She saw planting a garden as a way for them to engage in hands-on learning, learn lessons in cooperation and see something grow to fruition.

Jesenof worked to get a grant from the Southern Tier Community and Labor Aid for "seed money" and received permission from the owner of the lot to use it for a garden. Two middle-school classes, taught by Amanda Spottek and Lauriel McCoy, then became involved in the project. At the same time, Jesenof made contact with Harger, so the garden expanded to become a joint school-community project.

"This is a grassroots effort at its truest level," Jesenof said.

Work began this spring. The first step was cleaning litter and weeds from the lot, using picks and shovels, Harger said. The city's Graffiti Abatement Team cleaned graffiti off an adjacent building, which is used for storage by a rug company.

Some 36 large wooden boxes -- six of which the students built themselves -- now sit on the lot. Harger plans to have 50 boxes there by the end of June, all filled with soil and compost. The students and Harger are planting tomatoes, beans, carrots, marigolds and other vegetables and flowers.

Students come to the garden, weather permitting, for about 45 minutes every day. Harger is there every day for hours. On the weekends, four to eight neighborhood youngsters have been helping him, he said.

"I think it will change a lot. I hope people treat it with respect," said Aaron Sargeant, 12, of Endicott, one of the Columbus students working on the garden.

Harger brims with enthusiasm as he talks about the project. He calls it "a prototype" for other gardens throughout the city. He is now in the process of recruiting neighborhood volunteers to help him. "This is going to kick butt," he said. "If you want to save downtown, you have to save the surrounding neighborhoods."

Still, the garden is in its very early stages, he said. Realistically, out of every volunteer group that starts a community garden, only about 6 percent see it through to the end, he added.

Harger also recognizes that some will call this a fool's errand, with little chance of success. "They can sit on their butts and be naysayers," he said. "This is a neighborhood where it has to work."

This summer, students from the center's summer school programs will continue to tend the garden. They will be joined by youngsters in a summer enrichment program run by the nearby Broome County Urban League. Harger also plans to recruit neighborhood volunteers to help him.

While he wants to keep the garden open, fencing will go up if vandalism takes place, he said. He hopes that doesn't happen.

The payoff will hopefully come in the fall when the vegetables are harvested and possibly distributed to people in the neighborhood.

"I think it's awesome. It's a great opportunity for our kids to be part of the community," said McCoy as her class worked in the garden on a recent school day.




quote:
Thu 7 Jun 2007

Environmentalist dreams of New York rooftop farms
By Sinead Carew

NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York is better known for tall buildings and crowded streets than farms but a group of environmentalists say Gotham's rooftops could be used to grow enough vegetables to feed the entire city and reduce dependence on far-away farms.

New York Sun Works has opened an environmentally friendly Science Barge to prove its point. Moored on the Hudson River, it grows and harvests lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes in a greenhouse using rain and energy from solar panels and wind turbines and biofuels.

The nonprofit group says that if similar outfits, with hydroponic systems using water and no soil, were installed on the city's 14,000 acres (5,665 hectares) of unshaded rooftop, it could feed as many as 20 million people in New York City and the surrounding metropolitan area year round.

"If we planted those rooftops with hydroponic greenhouses ... we could grow comfortably more than enough fresh vegetables for the entire population of New York City," said Ted Caplow, head of the group behind the project.

Cities such as Havana, Hanoi and Singapore produce much of their food, but New York ships in almost all its food.

Caplow, an environmental engineer uses the barge, which cost $250,000 (126,000 pounds) to build, to show city kids how vegetables grow and to promote making New York more self-sufficient.

Growing local produce could cut carbon emissions, seen by scientists as a key cause of global warming, by reducing the need for trucks to deliver vegetables from long distances.

While many city residents have no access to rooftops, much less the permission to build farms on them, Caplow believes there could be possibilities for entrepreneurs or communities to use roofs of public buildings, or stores.

He envisions growers selling produce at farmers markets, to neighbourhood groups or at city chain stores like Whole Foods.

In the three weeks since the project opened, Caplow said he has had inquiries from roughly a dozen groups looking to set up similar operations, with questions coming from people as far away as the Middle East and Uruguay.

USES IN SCHOOL

Other interested groups include city schools looking to help teach horticulture and science and potentially provide food for the cafeteria.

Gioya Fennelly, a science teacher at Eleanor Roosevelt Intermediate School in Manhattan, said she is working on a plan to build a rooftop garden to help with classes.

"I've been toying with this for many years," said Fennelly, who started a garden in the school grounds about 10 years ago but favours a rooftop greenhouse to avoid vandalism, improve hygiene conditions and to make winter garden classes possible.

New York has other similar horticulture projects. Brooklyn's East New York Farms produces food in community gardens and young people sell the food locally. And volunteers in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn work at the nonprofit Added Value, which grows plants on a 3-acre (1.3-hectare) plot that was once a dilapidated playground.

But since ground-level space for community gardens is limited, Caplow favours use of the city's unused rooftops, which have about 10 times more space than the total U.S. ground covered by greenhouses.

He also notes that greenhouses produce seven times more food than traditional farmland using four times less water.

(c) Reuters 2007. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters and the Reuters sphere logo are registered trademarks and trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world.


 

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  posted on 6/12/2007 at 05:42 PM
http://www.cityfarmer.org/subrooftops.html

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 6/13/2007 at 06:10 PM
Tickets are priced at $100 for reserved and $50 for lawn, I just picked up a pair of lawn tickets.

 

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