Thread: Byrd: Obama in power grab

RBK - 2/25/2009 at 04:26 PM

Perhaps our 'best and brightest' will likewise ignore the words of one of their longtime democrat stalwarts who is warning of the same kind of institutionalized 'democrat-cy' that has right-thinking people up-in-arms. No doubt, overnight, Robert Byrd will be relegated to the same "traitor to the revolution' status now enjoyed by Joe Lieberman, et al.

I have become convinced that those who unflinchingly support BarryO are hopelessly ignorant if not downright stupid.

# # #

Byrd: Obama in power grab
By JOHN BRESNAHAN | 2/25/09 10:34 AM EST

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), the longest serving Democratic senator, is criticizing President Obama’s appointment of White House “czars” to oversee federal policy, saying these executive positions amount to a power grab by the executive branch.

In a letter to Obama on Wednesday, Byrd complained about Obama’s decision to create White House offices on health reform, urban affairs policy, and energy and climate change. Byrd said such positions “can threaten the Constitutional system of checks and balances. At the worst, White House staff have taken direction and control of programmatic areas that are the statutory responsibility of Senate-confirmed officials.”

While it's rare for Byrd to criticize a president in his own party, Byrd is a stern constitutional scholar who has always stood up for the legislative branch in its role in checking the power of the White House. Byrd no longer holds the powerful Appropriations chairmanship, so his criticism does not carry as much weight these days. Byrd repeatedly clashed with the Bush administration over executive power, and it appears that he's not limiting his criticism to Republican administrations/.

Byrd also wants Obama to limit claims of executive privilege while also ensuring that thes White House czars don’t have authority over Cabinet officers confirmed by the Senate.

“As presidential assistants and advisers, these White House staffers are not accountable for their actions to the Congress, to cabinet officials, and to virtually anyone but the president,” Byrd wrote. “They rarely testify before congressional committees, and often shield the information and decision-making process behind the assertion of executive privilege. In too many instances, White House staff have been allowed to inhibit openness and transparency, and reduce accountability.”

The West Virginia Democrat on Wednesday asked Obama to “consider the following: that assertions of executive privilege will be made only by the president, or with the president’s specific approval; that senior White House personnel will be limited from exercising authority over any person, any program, and any funding within the statutory responsibility of a Senate-confirmed department or agency head; that the President will be responsible for resolving any disagreement between a Senate-confirmed agency or department head and White House staff; and that the lines of authority and responsibility in the Administration will be transparent and open to the American public.”


SquatchTexas - 2/25/2009 at 04:53 PM

quote:
One of these things is not like the other.... Strange how your John Bresnahan penned article leaves a large amount of relevant information out.


From Politico and John Bresnahan

quote:
Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), the longest serving Democratic senator, is criticizing President Obama’s appointment of White House “czars” to oversee federal policy, saying these executive positions amount to a power grab by the executive branch.

In a letter to Obama on Wednesday, Byrd complained about Obama’s decision to create White House offices on health reform, urban affairs policy, and energy and climate change. Byrd said such positions “can threaten the Constitutional system of checks and balances. At the worst, White House staff have taken direction and control of programmatic areas that are the statutory responsibility of Senate-confirmed officials.”

While it's rare for Byrd to criticize a president in his own party, Byrd is a stern constitutional scholar who has always stood up for the legislative branch in its role in checking the power of the White House. Byrd no longer holds the powerful Appropriations chairmanship, so his criticism does not carry as much weight these days. Byrd repeatedly clashed with the Bush administration over executive power, and it appears that he's not limiting his criticism to Republican administrations/.

Byrd also wants Obama to limit claims of executive privilege while also ensuring that thes White House czars don’t have authority over Cabinet officers confirmed by the Senate.

"As presidential assistants and advisers, these White House staffers are not accountable for their actions to the Congress, to cabinet officials, and to virtually anyone but the president," Byrd wrote. "They rarely testify before congressional committees, and often shield the information and decision-making process behind the assertion of executive privilege. In too many instances, White House staff have been allowed to inhibit openness and transparency, and reduce accountability."

The West Virginia Democrat on Wednesday asked Obama to "consider the following: that assertions of executive privilege will be made only by the president, or with the president’s specific approval; that senior White House personnel will be limited from exercising authority over any person, any program, and any funding within the statutory responsibility of a Senate-confirmed department or agency head; that the President will be responsible for resolving any disagreement between a Senate-confirmed agency or department head and White House staff; and that the lines of authority and responsibility in the Administration will be transparent and open to the American public."

Obama faces a decision as early as next week on whether to support a claim of executive privilege made by former President Bush in refusing to allow Karl Rove, the former deputy White House chief of staff, to be deposed by the House Judiciary Committee on the White House’s role in the 2006 firing of nine U.S. attorneys.

Bush claimed "absolute immunity" for top advisors in resisting such subpoenas, by Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), chairman of the Judiciary Committee, filed a lawsuit over the issue. The case is on appeal, and the Obama administration is scheduled to file a motion next week laying out its stance on the issue.


Given that accountability is a key platform for Obama, Im not real worried about him keeping his word. Bush never cared about any form of accountability and its one of the reasons we are in the overall mess we are in. Next time, at least be honest enough to post the whole article, not just the bits and pieces you decide are important.


Brock - 2/25/2009 at 04:53 PM

While I don't agree w/ your conclusions on the effect of Byrd's letter, I do think Byrd has a point. Regardless of the President's party, strict adherence to the separation of power has served us well. We recently talked about Pres Obama possibly overstepping the statutory delegation from Congress on the census. That is, the Constitution vests in Congress the right to effect the census. Congress then delegated by statute that power to the Sec'y of Commerce. Presumably, because the Senate confirms the Sec'y, it can ensure a good person will oversee the census. So if the Pres moves the census to his chief of staff, as he floated, the Congress could amend the statute to take the power back.

I expect the same sort of statutory delegation has occurred w/ subjects that these other new, non-senate approved czars might oversee. The Pres would be wise to consider Sen Byrd's letter. Byrd is a walking history book of the Senate.


gondicar - 2/25/2009 at 05:18 PM

Move along, nothing to see here...


Billastro - 2/25/2009 at 05:37 PM

quote:
Move along, nothing to see here...
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?

There are none so blind as those who will not see.

Billastro


Bhawk - 2/25/2009 at 05:45 PM

quote:
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?



So let me get this straight. Conservatives have been ripping on Byrd for years. I mean years. They've been calling him "Sheets" Byrd for his past affiliation with the Klan for years. And now he's a respectable senior member of the Senate because he happens to say something that you are inclined to agree with?

Give. Me. An. Absolute. F*****g. Break.


SquatchTexas - 2/25/2009 at 06:41 PM

quote:
quote:
Move along, nothing to see here...
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?

There are none so blind as those who will not see.

Billastro


Thats not quite the intent of his message when taken in its entire context. He was warning against these issues and a lack of accountability. Thats just a little different than claiming that Byrd is freaking out over a 'power grab' by Obama.


DerekFromCincinnati - 2/25/2009 at 06:44 PM

Senator Byrd needs to retire and go home. he has done some good for my native state, but he has also been part of the problem. He set a whole state up to depend on the ups and downs of the coal industry and counting on governmental handouts in the form of pork. Depending on government like that does not incentivize branching out into other industries and West Virginia has suffered because of it. Every other turn of the corner has a road or bridge or building or something with Robert Byrd's name on it. The exit ramp and highway leading, eventually, to the mountain roads that lead to my grandpa's place in Pierpoint Holler - named after Byrd. Bridges, roads and buildings in Huntington where my Mom's side of the family came out of - Byrd, Byrd, Byrd. It's inescapable. While I appreciate his support of the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame and his donating of his Senate Leadership-inscribed fiddle, he needs to go home and nod out for a while.


gondicar - 2/25/2009 at 06:48 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Move along, nothing to see here...
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?

There are none so blind as those who will not see.

Billastro


Thats not quite the intent of his message when taken in its entire context. He was warning against these issues and a lack of accountability. Thats just a little different than claiming that Byrd is freaking out over a 'power grab' by Obama.


EGG-ZACT-LEE.

Besides, wasn't it Billastro who said in the RBK fan club thread he started that we should all ignore him? I was just acting on his advice after coming to the completely unneccessary, antagonistic, and classic troll-tactic line, "I have become convinced that those who unflinchingly support BarryO are hopelessly ignorant if not downright stupid."

EDIT: Billastro just proved (in another thread) that he is a much bigger man than RBK will ever be.

And with that I am done once and for all with RBK's threads. And I feel better already.

[Edited on 2/25/2009 by gondicar]


RBK - 2/25/2009 at 08:01 PM

quote:
quote:
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?



So let me get this straight. Conservatives have been ripping on Byrd for years. I mean years. They've been calling him "Sheets" Byrd for his past affiliation with the Klan for years. And now he's a respectable senior member of the Senate because he happens to say something that you are inclined to agree with?

Give. Me. An. Absolute. F*****g. Break.


What conservatives have, or haven't, said about Byrd in the past is entirely irrelevant to the point he making here. The point you conveniently overlooked in your feigned indignation.


Billastro - 2/25/2009 at 08:07 PM

quote:
Besides, wasn't it Billastro who said in the RBK fan club thread he started that we should all ignore him? I was just acting on his advice after coming to the completely unneccessary, antagonistic, and classic troll-tactic line, "I have become convinced that those who unflinchingly support BarryO are hopelessly ignorant if not downright stupid."

EDIT: Billastro just proved (in another thread) that he is a much bigger man than RBK will ever be.

And with that I am done once and for all with RBK's threads. And I feel better already.

[Edited on 2/25/2009 by gondicar]
1. Touche!

2. Thanks again for the kind words. I'll try not to make you eat them

3. Me too.

Billastro


brofan - 2/25/2009 at 08:12 PM

quote:
quote:
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?



So let me get this straight. Conservatives have been ripping on Byrd for years. I mean years. They've been calling him "Sheets" Byrd for his past affiliation with the Klan for years. And now he's a respectable senior member of the Senate because he happens to say something that you are inclined to agree with?

Give. Me. An. Absolute. F*****g. Break.


You nailed it. The same way that Hilary was the Anti-Christ until it became apparent that Obama could win the nomination and gain enough momentum to win the election. Then Rush and his dittoheads all of a sudden sported woodies for her during the whole "Operation Chaos" debacle. Which Limbaugh should be doing time for, BTW-along with all of his "apparatchiks" who did his bidding.


brofan - 2/25/2009 at 08:14 PM

quote:
Senator Byrd needs to retire and go home. he has done some good for my native state, but he has also been part of the problem. He set a whole state up to depend on the ups and downs of the coal industry and counting on governmental handouts in the form of pork. Depending on government like that does not incentivize branching out into other industries and West Virginia has suffered because of it. Every other turn of the corner has a road or bridge or building or something with Robert Byrd's name on it. The exit ramp and highway leading, eventually, to the mountain roads that lead to my grandpa's place in Pierpoint Holler - named after Byrd. Bridges, roads and buildings in Huntington where my Mom's side of the family came out of - Byrd, Byrd, Byrd. It's inescapable. While I appreciate his support of the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame and his donating of his Senate Leadership-inscribed fiddle, he needs to go home and nod out for a while.


I thought building bridges, roads and buildings created jobs...


RBK - 2/25/2009 at 08:34 PM

quote:
quote:
Senator Byrd needs to retire and go home. he has done some good for my native state, but he has also been part of the problem. He set a whole state up to depend on the ups and downs of the coal industry and counting on governmental handouts in the form of pork. Depending on government like that does not incentivize branching out into other industries and West Virginia has suffered because of it. Every other turn of the corner has a road or bridge or building or something with Robert Byrd's name on it. The exit ramp and highway leading, eventually, to the mountain roads that lead to my grandpa's place in Pierpoint Holler - named after Byrd. Bridges, roads and buildings in Huntington where my Mom's side of the family came out of - Byrd, Byrd, Byrd. It's inescapable. While I appreciate his support of the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame and his donating of his Senate Leadership-inscribed fiddle, he needs to go home and nod out for a while.


I thought building bridges, roads and buildings created jobs...


The government is NOT who you want to depend on to create jobs. The very notion that government is the answer flies in the face of what truly learned people know about government. These are the same people who brought you The War on Poverty, Social Security, Medicare, the public school system, Post Office and Midnight Basketball for goddsakes. Think man, think!


Bhawk - 2/25/2009 at 08:36 PM


spacemonkey - 2/25/2009 at 09:03 PM

quote:

In a letter to Obama on Wednesday, Byrd complained about Obama’s decision to create White House offices on health reform, urban affairs policy, and energy and climate change. Byrd said such positions “can threaten the Constitutional system of checks and balances. At the worst, White House staff have taken direction and control of programmatic areas that are the statutory responsibility of Senate-confirmed officials.”



I disagree with the Senator. As long as these policy czars only advise policy and don't direct the cabinette level
secretaries confirmed by the senate then their is no grab of power. Despite the fact cabinet secretaries
are confirmed and have their budgets set by congress, They still report directly to the president and can be removed
by the president at his pleasure.

The president is free from any constraints by congress to determine the structure of his own staff and advisors on policy
so long as they don't undermine the senate confirmed positions.

If he wants policy czars to advise him. that is his priveledge.

Byrd didn't get to set policy from his appropriations chair. Only through appropriations and by writing law through
bills does congress get its authority. They do not control the cabinette level postions, That is the President's domain.

If anything. This is a power grab by Byrd.









DerekFromCincinnati - 2/25/2009 at 09:38 PM

quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
Senator Byrd needs to retire and go home. he has done some good for my native state, but he has also been part of the problem. He set a whole state up to depend on the ups and downs of the coal industry and counting on governmental handouts in the form of pork. Depending on government like that does not incentivize branching out into other industries and West Virginia has suffered because of it. Every other turn of the corner has a road or bridge or building or something with Robert Byrd's name on it. The exit ramp and highway leading, eventually, to the mountain roads that lead to my grandpa's place in Pierpoint Holler - named after Byrd. Bridges, roads and buildings in Huntington where my Mom's side of the family came out of - Byrd, Byrd, Byrd. It's inescapable. While I appreciate his support of the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame and his donating of his Senate Leadership-inscribed fiddle, he needs to go home and nod out for a while.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



I thought building bridges, roads and buildings created jobs...


Not for 50 f*cking years. 50 years is a hell of stimulus bill. Coal or dependence on government pork does not incentivize the state to pursue other industries. The end result is that you either work in or on the mines, and my family knows first hand what the end result of that can be, or leave the state as a young person. Yes, if you are older and can afford to come back, it is an amazingly beautiful, wild and still isolated part of America. But for young folks, your job is to leave of you can. I know first hand.

quote:
Kathy Mattea Returns To West Virginia

The Herald Dispatch

By Derek Halsey

It is the dichotomy of the West Virginia experience -- a land of beautiful mountains, rolling hills, rivers and creeks, and valleys filled with good people. Yet it is also a state that does not provide enough job opportunities to keep the young folks at home. In neighboring Lincoln County, a move is afoot to do something about enhancing the lives of its young citizens.

In May, the Lincoln County Friends of the Arts (FOA) organization was formed, a group "dedicated to enhancing, promoting and celebrating the heritage of Lincoln County and the lives of its residents." The first event promoted by the FOA is this week's Lincoln County Heritage Festival, which will feature works by local and regional artisans and musicians, historical exhibits and performances by country music star Kathy Mattea on Thursday night and the legendary Dr. Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys on Saturday night. The focus of the festival will be the students of the area.

Lincoln County is one of West Virginia's most rural hamlets. Other than a couple of strip mines and some gas wells, there is not much in the way of large businesses among its hills and hollers. But, things are starting to turn around for the young folks of the county. The impetus for starting the FOA began as the brand new million-dollar Lincoln County High School was being built. This 2006-07 school year is the first for the school, which consolidated four other high schools in the area, and which boasts a sparkling new performing arts center.

The president of the FOA organization is local boy made good, Dan Butcher. Butcher was born and raised in Lincoln County, but left to find his fortune elsewhere after he graduated.

"What you will discover is that there are some very good people there that want to do well," Butcher said. "They're somewhat strapped because where they choose to live is not necessarily going to enable them to meet their financial goals. Like most rural areas, it's a hard scrap of life, whether you are in the coal fields or near the coal fields. It's always been that way. It's very typical of a county in West Virginia."

The objectives of the FOA are specific, Butcher said.

"The goal is to establish an arts organization that is well-grounded in solid business fundamentals, and that will provide for two things; a cultural experience for the arts in a rural area, and to enhance the education prospects for the next generation of kids that comes through.

"The second component is to create some form of economic activity. Lincoln County, with its geographic proximity to Huntington and Charleston and its cheap housing and a lot of available empty buildings, could make it as an arts community."

One project related to the festival that has already reaped benefits was the call for old photographs in the county. "They are starting to surface, that's for sure," Butcher said. "We've collected well over 150 different photos, some dating back to the 1880s. We've got photos of the first passenger train that ran from Salt Rock to Midkiff that went through West Hamlin. We have photos of a postmaster from 1906 who was driving around in a horse and buggy."

The focus of the festival on Thursday will be on the students, and many West Virginia organizations will be a part of the school-based fair. For instance, there will be regional artisans who will come in as a part of the Tamarack Foundation to show their woodworking wares, glass works, sculptures and other arts. There will be demonstrations on everything from horse shoeing to quilt making as the West Virginia University Extension Service sets up shop. The West Virginia Music Hall of Fame will have a booth there, and there will be an array of folk singers, fiddlers, cloggers, and storytellers performing during the next three days.

The Appalachian Education Initiative is also helping to put the weekend's events together. Meeting with the students and the public will be noted West Virginia authors Denise Giardina and Allen H. Loughry II. And, in a special school assembly, Kathy Mattea will address and play for the students of Lincoln County on Thursday before performing later that night.

Mattea grew up in Cross Lanes, W.Va. Both of her grandfathers were coal miners, and her story is a typical one.

"My mom, when she was still alive, I remember her talking about different factories that were shutting down and moving overseas, and all the chemical plants that were moving out that sustained the part of the state that I lived in," Mattea said in a phone interview.

After graduating from high school, Mattea had every intention of getting a college degree, but an opportunity presented itself.

While in college, Mattea and her musical friends recorded some demos and sent them out to a few record companies. All they got back were the usual form letters rejecting the songs, but on two of the letters were some hand-written notes praising the singer of the group. Mattea took that and ran with it, moving to Nashville and giving herself five years to make it.

"What happened for me was, and this is part of what I talk to these young kids about, it wasn't about whether I made it or not. It was about having the answer to that question so that I could go on with my life," Mattea said. "It was about really facing the question and saying, 'OK, well, I'm going to try it. If it doesn't work out, then I'll know.' And, I won't have to spend the rest of my life going, 'Well, what if I had done this, or what if I had done that.'

"Once you do that, you may not ever have a big music career, but you'll have another kind of peace that you can't get any other way. And then, that is success. Showing up for your own life is success.

"The way I look at it is, the only thing I have that is of any value is my own experience," Mattea said. "What I see my role in talking to these kids is to tell one person's story and maybe spark something in someone.

"And I don't know what it is that I might spark in somebody. I don't think it is my place to tell them that it is good to stay or good to go. It is not my place to tell somebody else what their decision should be. The only thing that I can really do is to try and inform them and impart something about the process that led me to clarity about my own decision. From that, I hope that they can learn something about where to find their own clarity about their own decisions. Because, I really believe that it is absolutely right for some people to leave, and it is absolutely right for some people to stay behind. And, I believe it is absolutely right for some people to leave and go out into the world and gain some knowledge so they can come back and make a change."

There is one thing that hasn't changed in Mattea, however, and that is her love for West Virginia.

"It is stunning," Mattea said of the beauty of the Mountain State. "That's the thing that I'm constantly struck with when I come home. I drove up into Fayette County a few months ago to see my father's oldest sister, my only remaining aunt on that side of the family, and just below Charleston up in Montgomery a few miles up the river, the mountains just explode. I was reminded again of the sheer beauty of it. It's just a breath-taking place.

"I went to see a friend that is real sick and is at the Mayo Clinic, an old family friend and he is from West Virginia, and I walked in and there was a Wolf Creek calendar from Alderson on his wall that had a silk screen of the mountains on it. Everywhere I go, wherever I walk into someone's house who is from West Virginia, one of those is on the wall. It's just a lovely little reminder.

"I'll meet people all over the country who will say. 'I'm a fellow West Virginian.' And I'll be like, 'Oh, really. How long have you been gone?' 'Oh, 25 years. We had to leave for work.' But they don't think of themselves as an Arizona person, or a California person, they really think of themselves as a West Virginian."


PhotoRon286 - 2/25/2009 at 11:29 PM

Byrd needs to retire.

The whole career politician thing (Jesse Helms) is a bunch of crap.

Noone needs to be "the 30 year Senator from bumpheck" any more.

Let all levels serve two terms then go away.


dougrhon - 2/26/2009 at 04:00 AM

quote:
While I don't agree w/ your conclusions on the effect of Byrd's letter, I do think Byrd has a point. Regardless of the President's party, strict adherence to the separation of power has served us well. We recently talked about Pres Obama possibly overstepping the statutory delegation from Congress on the census. That is, the Constitution vests in Congress the right to effect the census. Congress then delegated by statute that power to the Sec'y of Commerce. Presumably, because the Senate confirms the Sec'y, it can ensure a good person will oversee the census. So if the Pres moves the census to his chief of staff, as he floated, the Congress could amend the statute to take the power back.

I expect the same sort of statutory delegation has occurred w/ subjects that these other new, non-senate approved czars might oversee. The Pres would be wise to consider Sen Byrd's letter. Byrd is a walking history book of the Senate.



All presidents try to accrue power. All strong Senators oppose it. I think the last President that did not try to accrue power was Calvin Coolidge.


dougrhon - 2/26/2009 at 04:01 AM

quote:
quote:
The Democratic Senator with the most seniority implies that President Obama is involved in a power grab, and you say there's nothing to see?



So let me get this straight. Conservatives have been ripping on Byrd for years. I mean years. They've been calling him "Sheets" Byrd for his past affiliation with the Klan for years. And now he's a respectable senior member of the Senate because he happens to say something that you are inclined to agree with?

Give. Me. An. Absolute. F*****g. Break.


I agree with you. I wouldn't listen to a thing that windbag says and if he says something I agree with I would have to strongly re-consider my opinion. This is why politics today is a ridiculous game.


Brock - 2/26/2009 at 04:16 AM

quote:
quote:
While I don't agree w/ your conclusions on the effect of Byrd's letter, I do think Byrd has a point. Regardless of the President's party, strict adherence to the separation of power has served us well. We recently talked about Pres Obama possibly overstepping the statutory delegation from Congress on the census. That is, the Constitution vests in Congress the right to effect the census. Congress then delegated by statute that power to the Sec'y of Commerce. Presumably, because the Senate confirms the Sec'y, it can ensure a good person will oversee the census. So if the Pres moves the census to his chief of staff, as he floated, the Congress could amend the statute to take the power back.

I expect the same sort of statutory delegation has occurred w/ subjects that these other new, non-senate approved czars might oversee. The Pres would be wise to consider Sen Byrd's letter. Byrd is a walking history book of the Senate.



All presidents try to accrue power. All strong Senators oppose it. I think the last President that did not try to accrue power was Calvin Coolidge.


The above is but a series of truisms. I'm more interested in your opinion on the subject itself and whether Sen Byrd is right to resist the Pres placing more authority in non-Senate confirmed officials.


RBK - 2/26/2009 at 02:42 PM

quote:

All presidents try to accrue power. All strong Senators oppose it. I think the last President that did not try to accrue power was Calvin Coolidge.


The above is but a series of truisms. I'm more interested in your opinion on the subject itself and whether Sen Byrd is right to resist the Pres placing more authority in non-Senate confirmed officials.


Which was the purpose of the thread, BTW. Those who are now seeing the warnings that they scoffed at (re BarryO) coming to fruition are desperate to deflect the truth. Primarily from themselves.


dougrhon - 2/26/2009 at 06:08 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
While I don't agree w/ your conclusions on the effect of Byrd's letter, I do think Byrd has a point. Regardless of the President's party, strict adherence to the separation of power has served us well. We recently talked about Pres Obama possibly overstepping the statutory delegation from Congress on the census. That is, the Constitution vests in Congress the right to effect the census. Congress then delegated by statute that power to the Sec'y of Commerce. Presumably, because the Senate confirms the Sec'y, it can ensure a good person will oversee the census. So if the Pres moves the census to his chief of staff, as he floated, the Congress could amend the statute to take the power back.

I expect the same sort of statutory delegation has occurred w/ subjects that these other new, non-senate approved czars might oversee. The Pres would be wise to consider Sen Byrd's letter. Byrd is a walking history book of the Senate.



All presidents try to accrue power. All strong Senators oppose it. I think the last President that did not try to accrue power was Calvin Coolidge.


The above is but a series of truisms. I'm more interested in your opinion on the subject itself and whether Sen Byrd is right to resist the Pres placing more authority in non-Senate confirmed officials.


No. I disagree with Byrd. It has been a long time since the President was limited to the Cabinet Heads for advice seeking. The President should be entitled to have a staff he wants to work with and Congress has no say over that per the Constitution.


RBK - 2/26/2009 at 08:03 PM

Truth bump


RBK - 2/26/2009 at 08:16 PM


RBK - 2/26/2009 at 08:33 PM


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/

Url of this website:
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com//modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=viewthread&fid=127&tid=88761