Thread: US Air flight down in the Hudson River

rottinpeach - 1/15/2009 at 08:57 PM

Just now happened. LaGuardia to Charlotte flight.........


Many boats on the scene.

[Edited on 1/15/2009 by rottinpeach]


woodsdweller - 1/15/2009 at 09:01 PM

quote:
Just now happened. LaGuardia to Charlotte flight.........


Many boats on the scene.

[Edited on 1/15/2009 by rottinpeach]


initial reports say it ran into some birds.


sixty8 - 1/15/2009 at 09:02 PM

Watching this on TV!! Incredible that the plane held together during the crash and how long it's staying afloat. Hopefully everyone gets out alive. Say a prayer for those people.


Sandman - 1/15/2009 at 09:03 PM



rottinpeach - 1/15/2009 at 09:05 PM

What a picture.................looks like many got out by that shot. Hopefully....


lolasdeb - 1/15/2009 at 09:05 PM

That water has got to be dangerously cold. Glad there are no fatalaties here and that it was a controlled landing.


sixty8 - 1/15/2009 at 09:05 PM

Some passengers are saying that they think everyone got off. That would be great news.


rottinpeach - 1/15/2009 at 09:12 PM

A miracle if everyone gets off.

I have been on that flight from Charlotte to LGA many times. ALso have a lot of friends that are flight attendants. One friend just called and said his wife was not on it, but sometimes works that flight..........


bigann - 1/15/2009 at 09:17 PM

I hope everyone indeed got off safely.....cold maybe, but alive. I'm watching now and it's getting dark fast.


bigann - 1/15/2009 at 09:22 PM

Wow, the sun just came back out....must have just been real overcase from the first photos.


BigDaveOnBass - 1/15/2009 at 10:34 PM

What I want to know is....WHY were there still birds in NYC when it's so far into winter? I guess they couldn't afford to fly south this winter?

Had to make a little joke in relief that no one died or was seriously injured. Give the pilot and crew medals....and passengers a change of underwear.


gina - 1/15/2009 at 10:52 PM

Well BigDave, I think the birds are confused by the strange weather patterns. One day it is 40 degrees, the next day it is really cold. (and if you look on the national radar you will see it is clear and then wham in the space of 24 hours a big storm dumps snow on your area). The other thing I think is disruption of the sound space. You know that bees are dieing worldwide and they found out it is due to sound from cell phones when they are being used (it is something in the way the phones connect and the signals). Then there are disturbances to the electromagnetic field from equipment we use and also the military stuff.


bob1954 - 1/15/2009 at 11:46 PM

quote:
Then there are disturbances to the electromagnetic field from equipment we use and also the military stuff.

First thing I thought of when I saw that plane go down!


2112 - 1/16/2009 at 12:20 AM

I'm sure RBK will be along in a few minutes to blame the crash on Obama.


liveillusion - 1/16/2009 at 02:40 AM

Birds are a tremendous problem here in the city for airplanes. All year around too.
There are flocks of Canada Geese (who go no where all year ) Brandt & Snow geese. They travel in flocks and are abundant. JFK is right next to Jamaica Bay Wil;dlife refuge and they are always trying to scatter the Gulls and assorted geese.


PhotoRon286 - 1/16/2009 at 02:59 AM

quote:
Well BigDave, I think the birds are confused by the strange weather patterns. One day it is 40 degrees, the next day it is really cold. (and if you look on the national radar you will see it is clear and then wham in the space of 24 hours a big storm dumps snow on your area). The other thing I think is disruption of the sound space. You know that bees are dieing worldwide and they found out it is due to sound from cell phones when they are being used (it is something in the way the phones connect and the signals). Then there are disturbances to the electromagnetic field from equipment we use and also the military stuff.


Are you **** ing serious????


Link of some proof????


PhotoRon286 - 1/16/2009 at 02:59 AM

quote:
I'm sure RBK will be along in a few minutes to blame the crash on Obama.


More likely than gina's idea.


BigDaveOnBass - 1/16/2009 at 04:17 AM

quote:
Or it could be as simple as the fact that Canadian geese spend their winters in that part of the country.
That makes sense. New York is south of Canada.


alloak41 - 1/16/2009 at 05:36 AM

Amazing that the pilots were able to pull that off, losing both engines that close to the ground and adjusting for a perfect water landing. Next time I get on a plane, I want that guy!


Haisija - 1/16/2009 at 05:52 AM

Great job by the pilot. Glad to read that there were no serious injuries.
Geese...they are probably still in Canada also.
Cold snaps in Missouri, they stay and crap on the ice. They can handle to cold weather.
There is a unit known as the Kansas City flock. Gazillions of geese. I'm sure Bhawk can confirm it.


Haisija - 1/16/2009 at 06:44 AM

quote:
But, once again, this has nothing to do with a flock of geese crossing paths with a jet plane. In fact, birds colliding with planes isn't that unusual.




Seen several engines that were goosed or bird struck. Off to the junk yard they go.
Google up " bird strikes jet" in the photos.


alloak41 - 1/17/2009 at 07:21 AM

If you could nominate a positive, feel-good story so far for 2009 I'd say this would be it.

Still 50 weeks to go, but Sully is the leader in the clubhouse.


SantaCruzBluz - 1/17/2009 at 04:17 PM

I think this goes to show that what we like to call "heroic" is really just what most humans will do when given the chance. But my hat is off to all those ferry captains and others who immediately went to the scene to rescue people, and everyone else involved. Those folks were very fortunate to have such an experienced and skilled pilot in the cockpit. It's always good when a story has a happy ending. This will make a great movie!


Haisija - 1/17/2009 at 04:21 PM

3 cheers .
I'll be interested to see if it was a bird strike. I have't read the captain's accident report. 2 engines is kinda rare.


Bhawk - 1/17/2009 at 04:27 PM

quote:
Great job by the pilot. Glad to read that there were no serious injuries.
Geese...they are probably still in Canada also.
Cold snaps in Missouri, they stay and crap on the ice. They can handle to cold weather.
There is a unit known as the Kansas City flock. Gazillions of geese. I'm sure Bhawk can confirm it.


Absolutely. They leave little green lumps in every parking lot they frequent.


Bhawk - 1/17/2009 at 04:29 PM

The pilot's heroism goes without saying. He deserves all the accolades and more.

A couple other things are also mnidblowingly impressive from this as well - the fact that 155 people didn't panic - if there was ever a time to panic, being in a plane sinking in freezing water would certainly qualify. Also - the response time by the Port Authority and NYPD/FD boats. Amazing. New York certainly has tough resilience!


Haisija - 1/17/2009 at 04:32 PM

quote:
quote:
3 cheers .
I'll be interested to see if it was a bird strike. I have't read the captain's accident report. 2 engines is kinda rare.



It's rare, but geese fly in that V formation which spreads them out, so it is possible.


We service quite a few of US's Rolls Royce RB engines , I don't believe this was what was on the Airbus. If it was our service, I'll get a first hand look...and a feather.


SantaCruzBluz - 1/17/2009 at 04:37 PM

I've only flown in and out of NYC, never spent any time there. But the folks living in NYC are very impressive in the way they respond to emergencies.


Bhawk - 1/17/2009 at 04:54 PM

quote:
quote:
But, once again, this has nothing to do with a flock of geese crossing paths with a jet plane. In fact, birds colliding with planes isn't that unusual.




Seen several engines that were goosed or bird struck. Off to the junk yard they go.
Google up " bird strikes jet" in the photos.



I mentioned this in another thread, but this is certainly nothing new. My Dad has told me stories of when he was in the Air Force ('58-'62) and when they'd land their KC-135 in Tokyo they'd fly though giant numbers of "goony birds," then they'd have to spend a couple hours hosing the feathers and guts off the propellers and engines.


Haisija - 1/17/2009 at 05:24 PM

Always liked this one...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TyMGLjo6Ojo&feature=related



Haisija - 1/17/2009 at 05:29 PM

Right engine didn't break away, lucky foor the divers that they only have to retreive one.


bigann - 1/17/2009 at 05:36 PM

quote:
quote:
Well BigDave, I think the birds are confused by the strange weather patterns. One day it is 40 degrees, the next day it is really cold. (and if you look on the national radar you will see it is clear and then wham in the space of 24 hours a big storm dumps snow on your area). The other thing I think is disruption of the sound space. You know that bees are dieing worldwide and they found out it is due to sound from cell phones when they are being used (it is something in the way the phones connect and the signals). Then there are disturbances to the electromagnetic field from equipment we use and also the military stuff.


Are you **** ing serious????


Link of some proof????


I'm not saying this is true or false...but here's an article:

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp/2007/03/06/millions_of_bees_die_are_el ectromagnetic_signals_to_blame.htm


chris - 1/17/2009 at 06:39 PM


bigann - 1/17/2009 at 06:46 PM

If this guy ever wondered what his purpose in life was, that landing in the Hudson would have to be it. It's a real feel good story with a happy ending.....and we've all needed one of those lately I'm sure.


dougrhon - 1/17/2009 at 06:57 PM

Nobody has mentioned the co-pilot. Today I read that he took off his shirt and gave it to a freezing passenger whose shirt was wet.


bigann - 1/17/2009 at 07:44 PM

I've heard news reports talking about the co-captain and the rest of the crew and how important they all were to the final outcome. The point being made that the captain did a great job but he was supported by a lot of other people. One thing that impressed me was the captain was literally the last on off the plane after walking the interior twice to make certain everyone was out. Gives a new meaning to the captain going down with the ship!


chris - 1/17/2009 at 07:47 PM

Not to make light of this... but I can't help to think if I would have acted like Costanza and pushed all the children and women out of the way like he did on that episode.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuP9YClyPRY

skip to 1:25 into the video.


heineken515 - 1/17/2009 at 07:50 PM

Classic Costanza in that episode for sure...

That is indeed one of the amazing things about this story...several people that were on the plane said about the only thing you did hear were people praying.

The lack of hysteria is astounding for sure.


chris - 1/17/2009 at 08:01 PM

What makes me think is that I fly a lot. Especially between CLT and LGA.

Even though I fly 3x a month, I take Xanax. I am usually knocked out when we take off. WTF would I have done if I was on that plane?


rottinpeach - 1/18/2009 at 02:15 AM

My brother in law flies out of Charlotte quite a bit. Its usually to Boston, Philly, or New York. He told us that pilot flew some of his flights. He remembers that guy.


dougrhon - 1/18/2009 at 05:21 AM

They said the odds of a bird strike taking out both engines like that is less than one percent.


heineken515 - 1/18/2009 at 01:52 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
Well BigDave, I think the birds are confused by the strange weather patterns. One day it is 40 degrees, the next day it is really cold. (and if you look on the national radar you will see it is clear and then wham in the space of 24 hours a big storm dumps snow on your area). The other thing I think is disruption of the sound space. You know that bees are dieing worldwide and they found out it is due to sound from cell phones when they are being used (it is something in the way the phones connect and the signals). Then there are disturbances to the electromagnetic field from equipment we use and also the military stuff.


Are you **** ing serious????


Link of some proof????


I'm not saying this is true or false...but here's an article:

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp/2007/03/06/millions_of_bees_die_are_el ectromagnetic_signals_to_blame.htm


THat article is almost 2 years old. Later research has proven it false.


Here are snippets from http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572

There are three major possibilities that are being looked into by researchers:

pesticides
A new parasite or pathogen
A perfect storm of existing stresses may have unexpectedly weakened colonies leading to collapse

What about cell phones—do they have anything to do with CCD? (Colony Collapse Disorder)

The short answer is no.

There was a very small study done in Germany that looked at whether a particular type of base station for cordless phones could affect honey bee homing systems. But, despite all the attention that this study has received, it has nothing to do with CCD. Stefan Kimmel, the researcher who conducted the study and wrote the paper, recently e-mailed The Associated Press to say that there is "no link between our tiny little study and the CCD-phenomenon ... anything else said or written is a lie."



BigDaveOnBass - 1/18/2009 at 10:58 PM

Check this out.... What a story.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090118/ap_on_re_us/plane_splashdown_cockpit_dr ama

5 white-knuckled minutes aboard Flight 1549

NEW YORK – The birds flew majestically, in perfect formation, and the co-pilot saw them coming.

For a moment, it looked like they would pass beneath US Airways Flight 1549, but when Capt. Chesley B. Sullenberger looked up, they were there in his windscreen. Big. Dark brown. Lots of them.

His first instinct was to duck.

Then there were thumps, a burning smell, and silence as both jet engines cut out.

For a moment, the Airbus A320 hung in the sky 3,000 feet above the Bronx, its engines knocked so completely dead that one flight attendant said it sounded like being in a library.

Investigators provided this dramatic new description Saturday of what unfolded on the flight in the five brief minutes between its takeoff from LaGuardia Airport on Thursday and its textbook splashdown in the Hudson River.

The plane had been in the air for only 90 seconds when disaster struck. Air traffic controllers hadn't picked up the birds on their radar screens and were still giving climbing instructions when the pilot radioed that something had gone very wrong.

"Aaah, this is Cactus 1549," he said. "We lost thrust in both engines. We are turning back toward LaGuardia."

But he announced a new destination within moments. LaGuardia was out. So was Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

Sullenberger reasoned that his jet was "too low, too slow" and near too many tall buildings to reach any airport. And heading for Teterboro would mean risking a "catastrophic" crash in a populated neighborhood.

"We can't do it," he told air traffic control. "We're gonna be in the Hudson."

National Transportation Safety Board member Kitty Higgins recounted those radio transmissions and gave a detailed summary of Sullenberger's testimony to the investigation team on Saturday. She also recounted the NTSB's interview with the plane's first officer, Jeff Skiles, and three flight attendants.

Their account illustrated how quickly things deteriorated during the flight, and laid out the split-second command decisions that ultimately ensured that everyone aboard the plane survived.

The flight was supposed to have been the last leg of a four-trip day. The crew had begun the day in Pittsburgh, flown to Charlotte, N.C., then to LaGuardia, and were to head back to Charlotte in the afternoon. They got departure clearance at 3:25 p.m., and a minute later the jet was 700 feet in the air, heading north.

The birds came out of nowhere, Higgins said. They hadn't been on the radar screen of the air traffic controller who approved the departure, although other radar facilities later confirmed that their path intersected the jet as it climbed past 2,900 feet.

Back in the cabin, the passengers instantly knew something was wrong. They heard a thump, then eerie silence. A haze hung in the air. The flight attendants smelled something metallic burning.

"I think we hit a bird," said a passenger in first class.

In the cockpit, Sullenberger took over flying from Skiles, who had handled the takeoff, but had less experience in the Airbus.

"Your aircraft," the co-pilot said.

While the pilot quickly leveled the plane off to keep it from stalling and thought about where to land, Skiles kept trying to restart the engines. He also began working through a three-page list of procedures for an emergency landing. Normally, those procedures begin at 35,000 feet. This time, he started at 3,000.

Sullenberger made a sweeping left turn and took the gliding jet over the George Washington Bridge, and scanned the river, his best bet.

Pilots are trained to set down near a ship if they ditch, so they can be rescued before they drown or freeze to death in frigid seas. Sullenberger picked the perfect spot. The channel was 50 feet deep and clear of obstructions, but only minutes by boat from Manhattan's commuter ferry terminals.

It happened so fast, the pilots never had time to throw the aircraft's "ditch switch," which seals off vents and holes in the fuselage to make it more seaworthy.

Sullenberger issued a command over the intercom, "Brace for impact." Only 3 1/2 minutes had elapsed since the bird strike.

"Brace! Brace! Head down!" the flight attendants shouted to the passengers.

Security cameras on a Manhattan pier captured the spectacular landing. The jet came in easy, like it was coming down on land, and threw up spray as it slid on its belly.

Two flight attendants likened it to a hard landing — nothing more. There was one impact, no bounce, then a gradual deceleration.

"Neither one of them realized that they were in the water," Higgins said.

That changed quickly. The crew got two doors open. One water slide deployed automatically. The other had to be activated by hand. Passengers grabbed life preservers and seat cushions.

At the rear of the plane, a third flight attendant stopped a passenger from opening a rear door and letting in a gush of water, then made her way forward.

As the passengers made their way out onto the wings, she started to feel woozy. Only then did she notice that her leg had a severe cut — the most serious wound to anyone on board.

Sullenberger walked the cabin twice before abandoning ship.

He hadn't spoken to reporters yet on Saturday, but Higgins said, "He could not be more happy that he got everyone off the airplane safely."

The plane, too, was finally pulled from the river late Saturday night.

The bottom of the fuselage appeared to have been shredded and torn. Big chunks of loose paneling peeled away as it was lifted onto a barge — a sign, perhaps, of how close the jet came to breaking apart during a landing hard enough to rip metal, but slow and low enough to save 155 lives.


Haisija - 1/20/2009 at 05:41 PM

If it turns out that the aircraft that went into the Hudson was the same aircraft that lost power a few days earlier on the same fight from LGA to CLT , could get real interesting.


bigann - 1/20/2009 at 05:44 PM

Did you hear about the company who tried to charge four guys on the flight extra for cancelling their return tickets? The company said they'd be glad to take the man's credit card for the cancellation fees and he told them his card was at the bottom of the Hudson. After the publicity, the company waived the fees. Big of them considering they cancelled their original flight and rebooked them on the one that went down!!!


Haisija - 1/20/2009 at 06:29 PM

uh oh.....


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090120/ap_on_re_us/plane_splashdown


Haisija - 1/20/2009 at 07:11 PM

Goosein ?


BigDaveOnBass - 1/22/2009 at 04:20 PM

Coast Guard video of plane ditching in the Hudson released. Nothing happens until the 2:00 mark...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mLKfRVU3qM


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/

Url of this website:
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com//modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=viewthread&fid=127&tid=86695