Thread: Does your music reveal your politics?

LeglizHemp - 2/17/2014 at 10:36 PM

Streaming music service Pandora says it can predict your politics by the music you listen to. Laurie Segall reports.

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/us/2014/02/17/sot-wolf-segall-pando ra-politics.cnn.html


BillyBlastoff - 2/18/2014 at 03:28 AM

This is interesting and unsettling.


Fujirich - 2/18/2014 at 04:23 AM

I find this micro-marketing revolting, but inevitable.

It seems that there will be nowhere one can go in the future where we will not be marketed to.


gotdrumz - 2/18/2014 at 06:38 AM

I beg to differ.....

politics suck and the music I listen to doesn't


gondicar - 2/18/2014 at 02:00 PM

quote:
I find this micro-marketing revolting, but inevitable.

It seems that there will be nowhere one can go in the future where we will not be marketed to.


Get ready for more of it because this kind of marketing is becoming more and more important in how competitive, consumer-driven business is conducted in the 21st century.

For someone that is constantly banging the drum of letting markets be truely free, I find it odd that you would be so put off by the reality of what that means. In a free and open market where real competition exists, business will use whatever tools are available to them to reach their audience, sell more product and reap more profit. The only way to prevent it is more gov't regulation...or some kind of mass revolt from consumers but we all know that won't happen.

What is more reveloting/detestable to you, this type of marketing or any attempt to regulate or even eliminate it? I thought I knew the answer based on your previous ramblings (the exerpt below from one of your posts in the "Senate Dems Solicit Help From an Old Friend" topic), but now I'm not so sure?

quote:
I see those politicians as even more detestable than the businesses trying to influence them, as the businesses at least have to perform to some reasonable standard of quality and efficiency, otherwise competitors will put them out of business or the market will sour on their products.


BillyBlastoff - 2/18/2014 at 03:42 PM

quote:
quote:
I find this micro-marketing revolting, but inevitable.

It seems that there will be nowhere one can go in the future where we will not be marketed to.


Get ready for more of it because this kind of marketing is becoming more and more important in how competitive, consumer-driven business is conducted in the 21st century.

For someone that is constantly banging the drum of letting markets be truely free, I find it odd that you would be so put off by the reality of what that means. In a free and open market where real competition exists, business will use whatever tools are available to them to reach their audience, sell more product and reap more profit. The only way to prevent it is more gov't regulation...or some kind of mass revolt from consumers but we all know that won't happen.

What is more reveloting/detestable to you, this type of marketing or any attempt to regulate or even eliminate it? I thought I knew the answer based on your previous ramblings (the exerpt below from one of your posts in the "Senate Dems Solicit Help From an Old Friend" topic), but now I'm not so sure?

quote:
I see those politicians as even more detestable than the businesses trying to influence them, as the businesses at least have to perform to some reasonable standard of quality and efficiency, otherwise competitors will put them out of business or the market will sour on their products.



Excellent job maintaining consistency in the overall conversation Gondicar. Conversation is an art form. And just like in improvisational music listening is just as important as playing. I imagine you would have been a fine addition to the forums taking place in town squares in ancient Greece. Good on ya!


emr - 2/18/2014 at 04:27 PM

Big deal. Advertising on Lawrence Welk was different than that on American Bandstand


Fujirich - 2/18/2014 at 04:58 PM

quote:
What is more reveloting/detestable to you, this type of marketing or any attempt to regulate or even eliminate it?
The fact that I don't like it personally doesn't mean that I want some new bureaucracy created to oversee it. If it becomes annoying to enough people, the market will supply answers for that too.

Remember all the telemarketing from 800-numbered hustlers years ago? The market had already created a number of cheap solutions ($20 +/-) to block those calls. Did we need a 'do-not-call' list? Not in my opinion.

Smart companies that are concerned about what customers think of them will offer a means to opt out. Simple as that.

The ones that will be most annoying about using these technologies will be politicians. The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.

Back to the topic; on Pandora, I have set up stations for: ABB, Santana, Floyd, Knopfler, Snowy White, Camel, and Count Basie. I wonder what that says about my politics.


BoytonBrother - 2/18/2014 at 05:23 PM

This is purely a gimmick for entertainment. This site proves that music taste does not determine politics. I have plenty of die hard Springsteen fans that are equally far left and far right.

Of course there are exceptions. Pure hippy music will skew liberals, pure country will skew conservatives, Lady Gaga skews liberals, etc, but the majority will have an even mix.

Again, this site, and Allman fans in general, continue to blow my mind year after year. I can't think of any other band, except for The Beatles maybe, that has such a diverse set of fans: old, young, male, female, blue collar, white collar, hippies, corporate suits, bikers, conservatives, and liberals. Pretty amazing.


LeglizHemp - 2/18/2014 at 05:30 PM

its all about collecting info to put a profile together.

Take a quiz to see what your playlist might say about you.

http://projects.wsj.com/quiz/?uid=PandoraPoliticalAds&type=flat


gondicar - 2/18/2014 at 05:46 PM

quote:
This is purely a gimmick for entertainment.

It is not a gimmick. Music choices are defintely part of the data set that advanced marketers and other companies that deal in big data are amassing on consumers. That data is then modeled to create macro profiles that can then be used to deliver targeted advertising messages across a myriad of platforms, including plain old direct mail. This is science that is way more advanced than most in the general public know or care about.



[Edited on 2/18/2014 by gondicar]


LeglizHemp - 2/18/2014 at 05:56 PM

Don't forget the NSA

quote:
Music choices are defintely part of the data set that advanced marketers and other companies that deal in big data are amassing on consumers. That data is then modeled to create macro profiles that can then be used to deliver targeted advertising messages across a myriad of platforms, including plain old direct mail. This is science that is way more advanced than most in the general public know or care about.


alloak41 - 2/18/2014 at 06:03 PM

quote:
The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.


Perfect approach to attract the low information voter. Obama is unmatched in that endeavor.


Sang - 2/18/2014 at 06:09 PM

quote:
quote:
The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.


Perfect approach to attract the low information voter. Obama is unmatched in that endeavor.



Thanks for pointing that out for the 15th time, while ignoring the studies on the viewers of Faux News................ it's an effort to even read any of your posts anymore......


alloak41 - 2/18/2014 at 06:15 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.


Perfect approach to attract the low information voter. Obama is unmatched in that endeavor.



Thanks for pointing that out for the 15th time, while ignoring the studies on the viewers of Faux News................ it's an effort to even read any of your posts anymore......


Sorry, but one would be hard pressed to find a better example than that. The low-information voter tag didn't exactly just come out of nowhere.


kdick - 2/18/2014 at 06:25 PM

Not in the least. The amount of music genre's vs. political parties would suggest that it would be impossible to make the comparison. Music is very personal, politics is sold to you and I would suggest in this day and age, many vote to exercise their democratic right but for the least offensive idiot that is running in one of the maybe three choices available. Do the right thing, listen to music and get politcally agnostic!! Vote none of the above.........................................................


Sang - 2/18/2014 at 06:37 PM

quote:
Sorry, but one would be hard pressed to find a better example than that




My guess is that was another right wing email you believed - how would they have access to your voting record? Or your neighbors? They could have totals for a precinct, but that is it. Explain exactly where this happened and how they got someone's voting record......


Bhawk - 2/18/2014 at 06:43 PM

Campaign flyers? LOL


gondicar - 2/18/2014 at 06:59 PM

quote:
The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.

*If* such a flyer was distributed, without some evidence (beyond Fujirich's say so) I have a very hard time believing that it was sourced by, even approved by, or even seen by the Obama campaign itself. There were and are plenty of groups on both sides spraying crap like this (and worse) around...and some of them are even tax exempt!

quote:
Sorry, but one would be hard pressed to find a better example than that.

When it comes to campaign literature, there are always other examples...whether they are "better" will vary with opinion. Anyone else remember this one?







[Edited on 2/18/2014 by gondicar]


gondicar - 2/18/2014 at 09:22 PM

quote:
Don't forget the NSA

quote:
Music choices are defintely part of the data set that advanced marketers and other companies that deal in big data are amassing on consumers. That data is then modeled to create macro profiles that can then be used to deliver targeted advertising messages across a myriad of platforms, including plain old direct mail. This is science that is way more advanced than most in the general public know or care about.



And don't forget the real elephant in the room, Google. You think they shelled out over $3 billion for Nest just because they make nice thermostats?

[Edited on 2/18/2014 by gondicar]


BrerRabbit - 2/18/2014 at 09:25 PM


if my music really reflected my politics they would lock me away

"If my thought dreams could be seen
theyd probably put my head in a guillotine"

Dylan Its All Right Ma, I'm only bleeding


BillyBlastoff - 2/18/2014 at 09:44 PM

quote:
If it becomes annoying to enough people, the market will supply answers for that too.


The market already does. I pay for a commercial free subscription to Pandora.

quote:
Did we need a 'do-not-call' list? Not in my opinion.


This is clearly where our opinions differ. I think government must regulate business. Corporations by their nature are greedy and soulless entities. Allowed to operate unfettered they will do anything to make a profit. Remember Bhopal?

I'll admit a corrupt government doing the regulating sucks. At least it is something.


gondicar - 2/18/2014 at 10:00 PM

quote:
quote:
If it becomes annoying to enough people, the market will supply answers for that too.


The market already does. I pay for a commercial free subscription to Pandora.


But that doesn't mean that Pandora isn't using your usage data in other ways (selling it, for example).


BillyBlastoff - 2/18/2014 at 10:09 PM

quote:
But that doesn't mean that Pandora isn't using your usage data in other ways (selling it, for example).


I agree. I'm sure they contribute to targeted junk mail and other crap I get everyday.


alloak41 - 2/18/2014 at 11:43 PM

quote:
Corporations by their nature are greedy and soulless entities. Allowed to operate unfettered they will do anything to make a profit.


We get it by now. You feel that the pursuit of profit INVARIABLY brings out the worst in people. That's one way to look at it and I suppose that's true in certain cases, but that's not the rule. The pursuit of profit also brings out positive aspects in people.


pops42 - 2/18/2014 at 11:50 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
The Obama campaign sent out a personalized flyer in the last cycle that tried to contrast the recipient's voting record against their neighbor's. It was a classless attempt to generate feelings of exclusion and non-group behavior because you didn't vote for The One in the previous cycle, as it claimed your neighbors did. It was bs, but certainly would fool or impact those not thinking it through.


Perfect approach to attract the low information voter. Obama is unmatched in that endeavor.



Thanks for pointing that out for the 15th time, while ignoring the studies on the viewers of Faux News................ it's an effort to even read any of your posts anymore......


Sorry, but one would be hard pressed to find a better example than that. The low-information voter tag didn't exactly just come out of nowhere.
How about f*cktards that vote against their own economic self interests [the majority of republican voters] those that don't make 200k+ a year, [roped in by things like guns, anti woman's reproductive rights, anti civil rights] those are your "low information voters"


BillyBlastoff - 2/18/2014 at 11:59 PM

quote:
We get it by now. You feel that the pursuit of profit INVARIABLY brings out the worst in people. That's one way to look at it and I suppose that's true in certain cases, but that's not the rule. The pursuit of profit also brings out positive aspects in people.


Corporations are not people.


pops42 - 2/19/2014 at 12:14 AM

I saw a bumper sticker in el-paso that read: Ill believe corporations are people when texas executes one.


BillyBlastoff - 2/19/2014 at 12:53 AM

Heheheheheheheh.

To quote G.W.


alloak41 - 2/19/2014 at 01:27 AM

quote:
quote:
We get it by now. You feel that the pursuit of profit INVARIABLY brings out the worst in people. That's one way to look at it and I suppose that's true in certain cases, but that's not the rule. The pursuit of profit also brings out positive aspects in people.


Corporations are not people.


I think you missed the point. Are the file cabinets and fax machines running the day to day operations?


Billastro - 2/19/2014 at 03:19 PM

My wife and I are almost completely immune to any kind of advertising unless we hear about something we already would have bought. Coupons, pop-ups, magazine ads, commercials, etc. may alert us but they don't nudge us into buying something just because we've been targeted.

"Just say no!" works in a lot of ways!

Billastro


lukester420 - 2/21/2014 at 12:44 PM

quote:
Heheheheheheheh.

To quote G.W.

Hahahha, my day has been made.


jerryphilbob - 2/22/2014 at 02:40 PM

If you take the chip, you will be tracked, monitored, and targeted.


I would say, don't take the chip.


ScottyVII - 2/24/2014 at 06:43 AM

I remember one time I was on leave at a Dead concert in Philly and while I was waiting in line for beer a woman in line with me asked me what I did for a living, I politely replied that I was a Soldier stationed at Fort Bragg, NC. She then pretentiously replied "you're in the Army and you follow the Dead?" I was caught flatfooted and at a total loss for words when a couple behind me came to my defense and said to the woman "hey, it takes all kinds of people to make the scene special." My point is title does not dictate behavior!


gotdrumz - 2/24/2014 at 05:45 PM

quote:
If you take the chip, you will be tracked, monitored, and targeted.


I would say, don't take the chip.


I( like my chips with a nice slab-o-fish and a Guinness


sevan378 - 2/24/2014 at 06:21 PM

Based on the range of views on this forum, I'd say the politics run the gamut from pretty far right to way out left, so ABB fans befuddle those marketers.


dougrhon - 2/28/2014 at 09:42 PM

quote:
I remember one time I was on leave at a Dead concert in Philly and while I was waiting in line for beer a woman in line with me asked me what I did for a living, I politely replied that I was a Soldier stationed at Fort Bragg, NC. She then pretentiously replied "you're in the Army and you follow the Dead?" I was caught flatfooted and at a total loss for words when a couple behind me came to my defense and said to the woman "hey, it takes all kinds of people to make the scene special." My point is title does not dictate behavior!


A lot of people still think that conservatives are not cool enough to like rock music or jam music. It's ridiculous and untrue. I remember when some reporter expressed surprise that Bush had the Stones on his Ipod.


gondicar - 2/28/2014 at 09:51 PM

quote:
quote:
I remember one time I was on leave at a Dead concert in Philly and while I was waiting in line for beer a woman in line with me asked me what I did for a living, I politely replied that I was a Soldier stationed at Fort Bragg, NC. She then pretentiously replied "you're in the Army and you follow the Dead?" I was caught flatfooted and at a total loss for words when a couple behind me came to my defense and said to the woman "hey, it takes all kinds of people to make the scene special." My point is title does not dictate behavior!


A lot of people still think that conservatives are not cool enough to like rock music or jam music. It's ridiculous and untrue. I remember when some reporter expressed surprise that Bush had the Stones on his Ipod.


Former Mass governor William Weld (republican) was a big Dead fan. I saw him while he was governor during intermission at a Dead show at the old Boston Garden in 1991...he had red hair and stood about 6'4" and he was walking through the concourse dressed is a suit and tie with a couple of plainclothed troopers escorting and the trippy tie-dyed deadheads kept yelling "hey guv what's up!" and he was giving the thumbs up back to them...it was really kinda surreal.



[Edited on 2/28/2014 by gondicar]


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