Thread: Clapton Tour- WOW-Reviews

chuckels - 3/15/2013 at 11:45 AM

Set list says it all.

Clapton Set list Phoenix

1. Hello Old Friend
2. My Father's Eyes
3. Tell The Truth
4. Gotta Get Over
5. Black Cat Bone
6. Gotta Get Better
7.Tempted
8. I Shot The Sheriff
9. Drifting
10. Nobody Knows You
11. Tears in Heaven
12. Goodnight Irene
13. Wonderful Tonight
14. How Long
15. Stones in My Passway
16. Love in Vain
17. Crossroads
18. Little Queen of Spades
19. Layla
20. Cocaine
21. Sunshine of Your Love
22. High Time We Went




[Edited on 3/19/2013 by chuckels]

[Edited on 4/3/2013 by chuckels]


matt05 - 3/15/2013 at 12:22 PM

yeah the setlist says clapton lied and pulled back out "tears in heaven" and "my fathers eyes", 2 songs he stated in 2001 he retired after the reptile tour


rayg - 3/15/2013 at 01:06 PM

that must have been a long show. EC typically plays 16-18 songs. Any set list with Got To Get Better sounds good to me. Wht doesn't he play The Core?


dadof2 - 3/15/2013 at 01:16 PM

Very different setlist from past years...given EC's great band for this tour,I'd love to hear this....


peccles - 3/15/2013 at 02:43 PM

I wish he would retire Wonderful Tonight, Crossroads, Layla, Cocaine, and Sunshine of Your Love. His set list from '94 tour was good:
8 November 1994 - Eric Clapton & His Band
The Fillmore San Francisco, CA
Eric Clapton – guitar / vocals
Andy Fairweather Low – guitar
Chris Stainton – keyboards
Dave Bronze – bass
Andy Newmark – drums
Jerry Portnoy – harmonica
The Kick Horns (Simon Clarke – baritone saxophone, Roddy Lorimer – trumpet, Tim Sanders – tenor saxophone)

01. Motherless Child
02. Malted Milk
03. How Long Blues
04. Kidman Blues
05. County Jail
06. Forty Four
07. Blues All Day Long (Blues Leave Me Alone)
08. Standing Around Crying
09. Hoochie Coochie Man
10. It Hurts Me Too
11. Blues Before Sunrise
12. Third Degree
13. Reconsider Baby
14. Sinner’s Prayer
15. Can’t Judge Nobody
16. Early In The Morning
17. Every Day I Have The Blues
18. Someday After A While
19. Tore Down
20. Have You Ever Loved A Woman
21. Crossroads
22. Groaning The Blues
23. Five Long Years
24. Ain’t Nobody’s Business


HeathO96001 - 3/15/2013 at 03:12 PM

Thanks Chuckels! I can't wait to see Eric Clapton in CT next month!


musicmann - 3/15/2013 at 03:14 PM

Nice. Hoping to see EC @ the Crossroads festival next month!


allmanfan21 - 3/15/2013 at 05:22 PM

I'm seeing him in Dallas next Tuesday night!!!!!!!! If he does this setlist, it will be awesome!!


Brock - 3/15/2013 at 05:29 PM

Thank you Chuckles. I too will be seeing EC in something like 13 sleeps!


KWidgeon - 3/15/2013 at 05:34 PM

Looks like it was a great show! I, too, am tire of Wonderful Tonight, Cocaine & My Father's Eyes and most definitely agree on Got To Get Better in A Little While - love that tune.


chuckels - 3/15/2013 at 06:01 PM

What can I add. When EC wants to play look out. Band is excellent, Paul Carrack
brings back the Keyboard player who can really sing, which eric really enjoys.

Here is review from Arizona Republic.

Eric Clapton eased into the opening night of his tour in support of the just-released “Old Sock” at US Airways Center on Thursday, March 14, gently strumming acoustic guitar on “Hello Old Friend,” a laid-back track from “No Reason to Cry,” at the helm of a nine-piece band.

That mellow vibe continued on “My Father’s Eyes,” a reggae-flavored easy-listening hit from “Pilgrim.” But he’d strapped on an electric by the third song, “Tell the Truth” by Derek and the Dominos, squeezing out sparks on the first of several awe-inspiring solos, a series of fluid, well-phrased runs that really hit its stride when Clapton leaned into the bent notes at the end of certain lines and let them ring out. There was no shortage of stunning guitar work, of course, both by Clapton and second guitarist Doyle Bramhall II, by the time they’d closed the proper set with an epic “Cocaine” and then returned to start the encore strong with “Sunshine of Your Love.”

The man has assembled quite the cast of players for this tour, from the undeniable rhythm section of drummer Steve Jordan and bassist Willie Weeks, to Paul Carrack of Squeeze on Hammond B-3 organ and piano. On several occasions, the groove that rhythm section worked was as impressive as the soloing (see “Tell the Truth” and “Black Cat Bone,” which really swung). And Bramhall more than held his own against the master, while those female backup singers, Sharon White and Michelle John, added goosebump-raising gospel-flavored soul to the proceedings. They pretty much carried the vocals on “I Shot the Sheriff” and their wailing made the “Old Sock” original “Gotta Get Over” an unexpected highlight of the early set.

Clapton was good about sharing the spotlight, allowing for excellent solos from Bramhall, Carrack, pedal-steel guitarist Greg Leisz (who tore it up on “Black Cat Bone” by Albert Collins) and a second keyboard player, Chris Stainton. That also meant Carrack was able to sing a few, including Squeeze’s “Tempted,” Ace’s “How Long” and an encore-closing cover of the old Joe Cocker hit, “High Time We Went” (which Stainton co-wrote).

Early highlights included a slinkier reading of “I Shot the Sheriff,” which featured an epic Clapton solo that ended with him mirroring the melody on his way to restating the opening riff really high on the neck of his guitar, and a wah-guitar-driven rendition of “Got to Get Better in a Little While,” a funky, gospel-flavored gem by Derek and the Dominos.

Clapton returned to acoustic guitar for a mid-show mini-set of quieter material that started strong with “Driftin’ Blues” before making its way through a version of “Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out” that sounded more like Bessie Smith’s rendition than the one by Derek and the Dominos, a breezy, reggae-flavored “Tears In Heaven,” “Goodnight, Irene” and “Wonderful Tonight” (with Bramhall supplying the signature guitar line and Clapton recasting the tale in future tense for no apparent reason).

After Carrack took the mic for “How Long” with Clapton supplying a really nice solo, the concert turned into a Robert Johnson tribute, including a hard-grooving slide-guitar-driven “Stones in My Passway,” a swaggering “Love in Vain,” Clapton’s Cream staple “Crossroads,” which earned the most enthuastic audience reaction of the night to that point, and some of Clapton’s sweetest bends on “Little Queen of Spades.”

They pulled out of the Johnson mini-set with “Layla,” White and John taking the high notes on the chorus hook and Clapton turning in another epic solo. A pregnant pause at the end of his last solo made it feel like they were skipping the piano coda, but they didn’t, to their credit. There were moments were they seemed a little lost on that part, but this was the opening night of the tour, and they more than made up for the sense that they hadn’t quite practiced that section enough with moments of transcendence. Clapton could closed the set with that. Instead, he stuck around for “Cocaine,” stretching it to twice the length it is on “Slowhand” with rousing gospel vocals, yet another brilliant Clapton solo, a Carrack organ solo and a spotlight-stealing explosion of notes from Stainton working his way up the keys with a combination of reckless abandon and savage intensity.

Starting the encore with one of Cream’s best songs was an excellent way to build on the momentum of those last two numbers. And “High Time We Went” was a spirited (and playful) way to say goodnight. Just when you thought it was over, Jordan brought it back to life with some powerful drumming, Clapton grinning as he waved goodbye the final time the chorus rolled around, as though to say, “No, really, it’s high time we went.”

The Wallflowers opened the show with a well-received set that included "6th Avenue Heartache" and seemed to peak with a rousing rendition of the even hit "One Headlight." But then, Jakob Dylan took it up a notch with a spirited cover of Elvis Costello's cover of Nick Lowe's Brinsley Schwarz song "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding" before closing with another track from "Bringing Down the Horse," "The Difference."

Also, Dylan's really looking like his dad these days. Of course, it may just be the hat.


chuckels - 3/15/2013 at 10:42 PM






jkd-xrds - 3/15/2013 at 10:55 PM

Hey all, Long time!

I got to see this show last night, too. I was really pleased with the line-up and the set list. I was afraid it was going to be a let down after the last Clapton shows I attended (one with Winwood and several others w/ D. Trucks back in 2006/2007). The set list was a great mix, loved the accoustic stuff once again. He can't do a show without Wonderful Tonight, etc. - that's what most of the audience is there to hear. I was really surprised to hear Little Queen of Spades again - that was a treat although I missed Derek Trucks on that and Layla.
Layla was confusing during the coda - not sure Doyle Bramhall or Greg Leisz knew what part they were supposed to play. Doyle looked either hung over or very, very tired the entire night but played well. Not sure how well Tempted and How Long fit into the night but Paul Carrack still has a great voice - he looked and played inspired.
All in all, a great night with some nice surprises. We had great seats and a great view. I kept thinking this may be the last time I see him - heard he wants to retire in a couple years.


jkd-xrds - 3/15/2013 at 10:59 PM

Great pictures, chuckels!!


Charlesinator - 3/16/2013 at 12:58 AM

Hey "Wonderful Tonight" has been getting guitar players laid for over thiry years now. Keep it in the set! I'd love to hear "Peaches And Diesel" Anybody think that one maybe about Duane???


darencole - 3/16/2013 at 01:40 AM

Would love to hear that setlist!


sheep - 3/16/2013 at 02:17 AM

It would be nice if the fans could send the message that he doesn't need to play Cocaine and Wonderful Tonight anymore. Other than that, I'm really enjoying the new CD. Got to Get Over, one of only two new songs, has a nice feel to it, with the dual guitar interaction. One of his better new songs in quite a while.

[Edited on 3/16/2013 by sheep]


chuckels - 3/16/2013 at 03:26 AM

Concert review: Phoenix crowd glad EC was here
March 15, 2013
By: Ted Hansen
Rating for Eric Clapton, March 14, 2013, Phoenix, Arizona

5 out of 5 Stars

It was billed as the opening night of Eric Clapton’s 50th Anniversary Tour. If this is Clapton’s golden anniversary of performing, then he must have joined The Roosters and The Yardbirds back in 1963 at age 3 (he was actually 17). Clapton’s performance on Thursday, March 14, 2013 at the U.S. Airways Center in Phoenix was neither tired nor old, as a fifty year celebration might suggest. Clapton wowed the near capacity crowd and did nothing to dispel the graffiti writing found in 1967 in an English Underground station that “Clapton is God.”

Sandwiched in between hello (“ Hello Old Friend”) and goodbye (“High Time We Went”), Clapton and his all-star band showcased his fifty year career. There were songs from his group days such as Derek and the Dominoes’ “Tell the Truth,” “Layla,” and “Nobody Knows When You’re Down and Out” plus Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love.” There were his early solo career hits such as “I Shot the Sheriff” and “Wonderful Tonight.” His “unplugged” resurrection in the 1990’s gave the evening “Tears In Heaven.” Clapton’s love affair with the blues and especially, blues man Robert Johnson, was evident by his four song mini set of Johnson’s tunes including “Crossroads” and “Love in Vain.”

Clapton took the stage for his over two hour set, acoustic guitar in hand, opening with the mellow and inviting, “Hello Old Friend,” which had the standing audience quickly sitting back down to enjoy the evening. Although the audience remained seated most of the night, it seemed appropriate. With a multitude of blues oriented tunes, Clapton would have been just at ease playing a small blues nightclub rather than a large arena. For a good portion of the night, all that was missing was the rise of cigarette smoke and a bottle of whiskey on an uneven table.

The best seem to push their ability by surrounding themselves with the best. Clapton’s band would be any performer’s dream. Grammy award winning, Blue Brothers member, Steve Jordan handled drums. Long time touring vet and session man Willie Weeks performed his magic on bass. Greg Leisz, a master sideman, dominated with his pedal-steel guitar work all night long. Sought after guitarist, Doyle Bramhall II supplied second guitar. Expert piano was conjured up by long time Clapton keyboard player and former member of Joe Cocker’s band, Chris Stainton. Former Ace, Squeeze and Mike and the Mechanics vocalist Paul Carrack played keyboards as well. As they have on Clapton’s tours for the past many years, Michelle John and Sharon White added their sweet backup vocals.

When you are a three time inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, you have earned the right to change up the tempo of your songs and Clapton did just that. “Tell the Truth,” had a much more 1950’s rock and roll style to it than the song has been recorded. “I Shot the Sheriff” was less reggae and more rock.

Clapton had no problem sharing the spotlight with his band. Leisz and Bramhall were given numerous solos. Carrack’s vocals spiced up the night with his rendition of “Tempted." With “How Long,” Carrack managed to pull back a crowd that Clapton seemed on the verge of losing after a five song “unplugged” set.

Momentum built with “Crossroads,” which took on an almost revivalist flair. Having a robed choir filter through the aisles would not have seemed out of place. With “Little Queen of Spades,” everybody in the band seemed to cut loose. Stainton and Bramhall had nice solos. No longer was the performance one of quaint blues associated with an intimate nightclub. This was beginning to become a full blown soul revue.

With the audience now standing, Clapton tore into “Layla,” with roars of approval from the crowd. As masterful of the blues as Clapton is, and he truly is, this is what the crowd came to see. Adding to the frenzy was the set closer, “Cocaine,” which was the first true audience sing-a-long of the night. Carrack, Stainton and Clapton all performed solos and there was no doubt the crowd wanted more.

The now up tempo evening continued with the encore as Clapton burst into the familiar chords of “Sunshine of Your Love.” Once more, the crowd sang the chorus, almost drowning out the vocals. To end the night, Clapton again handed the vocal reigns over to Carrack as the band performed Joe Cocker’s “High Time We Went,” a tune co-written by Stainton. Although Clapton waived goodbye, the audience wasn’t ready to give him up.

Starting off the evening was a tight, forty five minute set by Jakob Dylan’s, The Wallflowers. Knowing they were limited on time, the band raced through a solid set, highlighted by their hit “One Headlight.” Gina Romantini provided some blazing violin work to go along with Dylan and company’s outing. A note to Wallflower fans. Show up on time. They began their set precisely at the announced 7:30 start time.

After fifty years it’s doubtful that those who might have witnessed a Clapton performance in the 1960’s, good or bad, could remember it today. But what they will remember is that after fifty years, Clapton still can sing and wow, can he still play.

On behalf of the majority of the crowd who was not close enough to watch Clapton command his fret board, a special thanks to the cameramen who focused on Clapton’s hands during his numerous solos allowing them to be shown on the big screens above the stage. Clapton’s unmatched ability can still make something so difficult seem to be so smooth and effortless. After this night’s performance, there might arise some new graffiti on the Phoenix light rail walls reaffirming Clapton's deity status.


Bluenose - 3/16/2013 at 04:39 PM

Wow....anyone know if The Wallflowers are opening act the whole way through the tour?

Set list is looking good.


allmanfan21 - 3/17/2013 at 03:20 PM

I read a review of last night's show in Houston. He didn't play Layla last night. I hope he puts it back into the setlist for Dallas on Tuesday night.


chuckels - 3/18/2013 at 07:30 AM

quote:
I read a review of last night's show in Houston. He didn't play Layla last night. I hope he puts it back into the setlist for Dallas on Tuesday night.


Layla back in and Lay Down Sally added for Austin show.

Jimmie Vaughn jammed on Albert Collins "Black Cat Bone" "

[Edited on 3/18/2013 by chuckels]


allmanfan21 - 3/18/2013 at 08:40 PM

I wonder if he'll throw a few different songs into tomorrow's show in Dallas. It'd be cool to hear No Alibis & White Room.


KWidgeon - 3/18/2013 at 08:51 PM

quote:
quote:
I read a review of last night's show in Houston. He didn't play Layla last night. I hope he puts it back into the setlist for Dallas on Tuesday night.


Layla back in and Lay Down Sally added for Austin show.

Jimmie Vaughn jammed on Albert Collins "Black Cat Bone" "

[Edited on 3/18/2013 by chuckels]


I'll bet that was great!

Thank you so much, Chuckels for all the reviews, pictures and posts. I really appreciate them. There are many EC fans here. I've been one since my brother introduced me to Cream when I was still in elementary school.


Rob_in_NC - 3/19/2013 at 12:11 AM

Three words I've not seen in any review ... since around 1975:

Ace's "How Long"


chuckels - 3/19/2013 at 05:11 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
I read a review of last night's show in Houston. He didn't play Layla last night. I hope he puts it back into the setlist for Dallas on Tuesday night.


Layla back in and Lay Down Sally added for Austin show.

Jimmie Vaughn jammed on Albert Collins "Black Cat Bone" "

[Edited on 3/18/2013 by chuckels]


I'll bet that was great!

Thank you so much, Chuckels for all the reviews, pictures and posts. I really appreciate them. There are many EC fans here. I've been one since my brother introduced me to Cream when I was still in elementary school.


Thank you, you are most welcome!


chuckels - 3/19/2013 at 05:15 PM

Eric Clapton Spans His Career on 50th Anniversary Tour
by David Fricke


Eric Clapton's March 17th concert in Austin, Texas – the third date on his latest North American tour – was a career overview that covered all of his major turning points as a guitarist and most of his commercial successes: Cream, Derek and the Dominos, the Seventies solo hits and his matured resurgence in the Nineties with the MTV Unplugged performance and album. But the long heart of this two-hour show at the Frank Erwin Center was four songs associated with the pioneering, star-crossed Mississippi bluesman who set Clapton on his path, Robert Johnson.

Deep into the set list, after a seated, acoustic stretch that included Clapton's 1977 ballad "Wonderful Tonight" and his down-gear Unplugged rearrangement of the Dominos' "Layla," Clapton strapped on a Stratocaster and pulled the trigger on Johnson's "Stones in My Passway," quoting his own Cream-era riff from Johnson's "Crossroads" but with more Delta syntax. "Love in Vain," best known in the Rolling Stones' plaintive 1969 recording, was taken as a crisp electric shuffle, followed by "Crossroads" itself, with Clapton – who long abandoned the supercharged Les Paul-guitar tone of the Cream adaption – soloing with a spiked, treble attack closer to the one he first turned to in the Dominos.

The homage to Johnson concluded with a fixture of recent Clapton tours, "Little Queen of Spades." At one point in the extended jamming center of the tune, Clapton fell back into his self-effacing-sideman mode, giving generous solo space to his longtime pianist Chris Stainton. But the guitarist's torrid, opening choruses, improvising against the earthy churn of drummer Steve Jordan and bassist Willie Weeks, drew a standing ovation – affirmation of Clapton's ability, two weeks before his 68th birthday, to elevate and electrify at the same time he honors his priests and sources.

Clapton's current tour arrived in Austin in the wake of the SXSW conference and festival, as attendees emptied the city and locals were running on fumes. He paid homage to the city in words – "It's nice to be in a music town – I can feel it" – and action, inviting guitarist Jimmie Vaughan, older brother of the late Stevie Ray Vaughan and a Texas monster in his own right, to pick some Freddy King-style fire in "Black Snake Moan." Clapton also let his Dallas-born supporting guitarist Doyle Bramhall II take a lengthy slide break in the Dominos' "Tell the Truth," evoking the challenge and incandescence the late guitarist Duane Allman brought to that short-lived band.

But the valedictory tone of the evening – a life in blues and guitar playing, well-lived and emotionally cross-examined – was set at the very front, in "Hello Old Friend" from Clapton's 1976 album, No Reason to Cry, and the surprising resurrection of a later obscurity, "My Father's Eyes" on 1998's Pilgrim. Leading an eight-piece band (including a pedal-steel guitarist) in gentleman-laborer dress (jeans, gray shirt, black vest and glasses), Clapton looked nothing like a guitar hero. His body went rigid and his features froze in eyes-shut concentration when his playing was most physical: the funky wah-wah-soaked riffing in the Dominos' "Got to Get Better in a Little While"; the sharp biting class of his phrasing in the run-out solo of "I Shot the Sheriff." Clapton also gave big chunks of the spotlight to others, especially organist Paul Carrack, who sang his two lucky strikes, "Tempted" (his hit with Squeeze) and "How Long" (the one with the mid-Seventies pub-rock combo Ace).

There was also an intriguing restlessness to the way Clapton addressed his past, one that did not sound like that of a man who recently told Rolling Stone that he intends to retire from major touring. (He told me the same thing more than a decade ago, to no apparent effect.) Clapton didn't solo until the third song, "Tell the Truth," but his shrieking phrases and slalom runs were muscular and concise, firm declarations of undiminished facility and enthusiasm. He revived Unplugged's "Tears in Heaven" with a subtle, effective jolt: a slight offbeat in Jordan's drumming, which added a warm, reggae lilt to the requiem. And just as Clapton seemed done for the night, after an obligatory "Sunshine of Your Love" during the encore, he cued Carrack into an organ vamp that became Joe Cocker's "High Time We Went," a 1972 Ray Charles-style rave-up that Stainton co-wrote with the singer.

Clapton's tour will bring him to New York's Madison Square Garden on April 12th and 13th, where he will host a multitude of guitarists for a two-day edition of his Crossroads festival and shootout. The way he played Sunday suggests he will be ready for whatever his idols, friends and disciples throw at him; will give better than that in return; and is still a long way from sunset

[Edited on 3/20/2013 by chuckels]


Chitown - 3/19/2013 at 05:44 PM

quote:
Set list says it all.

Clapton Set list Phoenix

1. Hello Old Friend
2. My Father's Eyes
3. Tell The Truth
4. Gotta Get Over
5. Black Cat Bone
6. Gotta Get Better
7.Tempted
8. I Shot The Sheriff
9. Drifting
10. Nobody Knows You
11. Tears in Heaven
12. Goodnight Irene
13. Wonderful Tonight
14. How Long
15. Stones in My Passway
16. Love in Vain
17. Crossroads
18. Little Queen of Spades
19. Layla
20. Cocaine
21. Sunshine of Your Love
22. High Time We Went



Looks like we're back to "EC Light". The only thing that set list makes me wanna do is stay home.......and put on 3/20/09.


Chitown - 3/19/2013 at 05:47 PM

Good Night Irene? Really? Yeah, I'll see you in the morning alright. A morning in 2040-when I'm 80.


TRMGDEAD - 3/19/2013 at 07:06 PM

You people actually complain about EC? Communists you are.


allmanfan21 - 3/19/2013 at 07:28 PM

I'm looking forward to the show in Dallas tonight!! I read a few reviews where people said that EC didn't play guitar enough during the first few shows of this tour. I'm sure he plays enough, plus he has Doyle playing and Greg Leisz as well, and they're both great players.


Chitown - 3/19/2013 at 08:23 PM

quote:
You people actually complain about EC? Communists you are.


With a setlist as tired as that one, I will express my dissatisfaction, absolutely. I would call this the "Clueless Suburban housewifes that like fluffy ballads tour". And I believe in Capitalism, thanks for asking. Have you heard "MEMPHIS"? Here's my review of that: Zzzzzzzzzzz. (Okay, I liked the Gary Moore tune a bit, but overall: Boring).


chuckels - 3/20/2013 at 04:31 AM

Badge played tonight first time on tour.

Love that song!


WarEagleRK - 3/20/2013 at 11:09 AM

I truly hope that if I enjoy the show next Wednesday in Atlanta that I don't turn into a "clueless surburban housewife". I'd have a lot of explaining to do to my wife if that happened.


Brock - 3/20/2013 at 02:40 PM

Thanks for the continuing reports Chuckels. Not all the songs interest me either, but damn it it's Clapton!


Slyckyr - 3/20/2013 at 03:22 PM

Any of you that have seen this tour know what time EC generally takes the stage?
I'm guessing around 8:45 to 9:00?


allmanfan21 - 3/20/2013 at 03:48 PM

Last night's show was awesome!! Was great to hear Hello Old Friend open, and Badge was great to. I loved hearing Lay Down Sally & Wonderful Tonight in the acoustic set. Greg Leisz can really play that steel guitar. Great show, and maybe Clapton will play again, but if it's his last tour, then he certainly did a great job last night!!


KWidgeon - 3/20/2013 at 06:16 PM

quote:
Badge played tonight first time on tour.

Love that song!


One of my all time favorites too! Always love Got To Get Better In A Little While. Hope he does it a couple times yet.


dadof2 - 3/20/2013 at 06:46 PM

quote:
I truly hope that if I enjoy the show next Wednesday in Atlanta that I don't turn into a "clueless surburban housewife". I'd have a lot of explaining to do to my wife if that happened.


LMAO


lolasdeb - 3/20/2013 at 08:22 PM

quote:
Badge played tonight first time on tour.

Love that song!
Me too!!! (wish I was seeing him on this tour...)


TRMGDEAD - 3/20/2013 at 08:27 PM

quote:
quote:
You people actually complain about EC? Communists you are.


With a setlist as tired as that one, I will express my dissatisfaction, absolutely. I would call this the "Clueless Suburban housewifes that like fluffy ballads tour". And I believe in Capitalism, thanks for asking. Have you heard "MEMPHIS"? Here's my review of that: Zzzzzzzzzzz. (Okay, I liked the Gary Moore tune a bit, but overall: Boring).
You sound like a real gem. Wouldn't that be "housewives"? EC for me is the place to be.


BillyBlastoff - 3/20/2013 at 10:35 PM

I've seen most of Clapton's post 70's tours. I've felt for many years that he should play more intimate theaters and say goodbye to arena shows. I'll still go see him and don't think the shows described on this thread are not of value.

I do wish Mr. Clapton would find his muse and write some new material. That said I can't fault a man for settling back and enjoying his golden years. EC has provided me joyous music and good times by sharing his art. For that I sincerely thank him.


bump827 - 3/20/2013 at 10:47 PM

I'll see him two nights at Crossroads but his last few tours at the prices he gets don't seem worth the money to me.


bump827 - 3/20/2013 at 10:50 PM

And by the way Rolling Stone would give him a great review even if he sucked. They lauded over the EC tour with Jeff Beck when they barely got anywhere close to each other. Most RS reviews laud "their artists". The last few Bruce Springsteen albums have sucked to me yet they kowtow to him. And I've been a fan since 1973


allmanfan21 - 3/21/2013 at 12:19 AM

I hope that maybe a live album or DVD is made from this tour. There's another thread that says he's planning to record the Royal Albert Hall shows in May and have special guests. I hope this is true. It was awesome to hear Hello Old Friend & Lay Down Sally!!


bump827 - 3/21/2013 at 02:10 AM

quote:
I hope that maybe a live album or DVD is made from this tour. There's another thread that says he's planning to record the Royal Albert Hall shows in May and have special guests. I hope this is true. It was awesome to hear Hello Old Friend & Lay Down Sally!!


We'll see. I assume there will be a Crossroads DVD on the horizon. The old 24 Nights was well served by the sound and DVD done though.


WarEagleRK - 3/21/2013 at 11:07 AM

quote:
And by the way Rolling Stone would give him a great review even if he sucked. They lauded over the EC tour with Jeff Beck when they barely got anywhere close to each other. Most RS reviews laud "their artists". The last few Bruce Springsteen albums have sucked to me yet they kowtow to him. And I've been a fan since 1973


I think they only gave Old Sock 3 stars, so it wasn't like they were gushing over him.

While I disagree that the last few Springsteen albums have sucked, I do agree that U2, Dylan and Springsteen always have 5 stars reserved for them.


Brock - 3/28/2013 at 03:29 AM

Duluth, GA 3-27-13:

1. Hello Old Friend
2. My Father's Eyes
3. Tell The Truth
4. Gotta Get Over
5. Black Cat Bone
6. Gotta Get Better In A Little While
7. Tempted
8. Badge
9. Driftin'
9A. Lay Down Sally
10. Tears In Heaven
11. Layla
12. Wonderful Tonight
13. How Long
14. Stones In My Passway
15. Love In Vain
16. Crossroads
17. Little Queen Of Spades
18. Cocaine
19. Sunshine Of Your Love
20. High Time We Went

Not bad. I expect the clueless housewives liked it less than I did. I might have missed a song after Tears, as that one had me sprinting for a break.

Best all night was a ripping Gotta Get Better, and the Love in Vain was most excellent w/ a nice Doyle solo and an extended Stainton keys solo. Little Queen was right up there too. Liked the two Squeeze numbers, and EC made sure everyone got some spotlight. EC and Doyle traded vocals on Sunshine, which finally got the crowd on its feet (old crowd; I was right at home!).

Much, much better than '10 when I saw him. Even though it has been sold out for a week or so, a good number of varied quality tix were released today, so check on the day of show and go.

EDIT, added Lay Down Sally per War EagleRK. Forgot that one.

[Edited on 3/28/2013 by Brock]


WarEagleRK - 3/28/2013 at 05:29 AM

The jam at the end of "Got To Get Better In A Little While" tonight was incredible.

I could have done without Paul Carrack singing "Tempted" and "How Long", but other than that great show tonight.


Looks like you forgot "Lay Down Sally" from your set list above. I think it was right after "Driftin" in the set.

[Edited on 3/28/2013 by WarEagleRK]


Brock - 3/28/2013 at 02:33 PM

Decent review of last night:

http://www.accessatlanta.com/weblogs/atlanta-music-scene/2013/mar/28/eric-c lapton-provides-master-class-musicianship/


Chitown - 3/28/2013 at 04:09 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
You people actually complain about EC? Communists you are.


With a setlist as tired as that one, I will express my dissatisfaction, absolutely. I would call this the "Clueless Suburban housewifes that like fluffy ballads tour". And I believe in Capitalism, thanks for asking. Have you heard "MEMPHIS"? Here's my review of that: Zzzzzzzzzzz. (Okay, I liked the Gary Moore tune a bit, but overall: Boring).
You sound like a real gem. Wouldn't that be "housewives"? EC for me is the place to be.


That is correct, I should have typed "HousewiVes". My point is that whether it was the 88 tour with Mark Knopfler in his band, or 2006 with Derek touring and playing a bunch of Domino's tunes, EC is at his best when he has someone pushing his guitar playing. I don't see that with Doyle either, which may explain his longevity. With the back catalog EC has, I don't feel the need to go hear I Shot the Sheriff, Wonderful Tonight, Tears in Heaven, etc..., especially with the combination of the cost of a ticket and the fact that he plays so many of the same tunes tour after tour. With consideration to that back catalog, I have heard those tunes too many times, and I think it would be refreshing to hear him mix it up. I think Hello Old Friend is a good example of pulling out at least one tune from his catalog that he hasn't performed live in years. For me it's because I've seen him 20 times over the last 30 years. If you have never or rarely seen him, by all means, go to the show and enjoy. I'm just stating my opinion from my vantage point. And I still think his new CD is boring.


rayg - 3/28/2013 at 08:24 PM

Best Clapton shows this year will be the one's with The Brothers. The 2009 Beacon shows where Eric tackled Dreams , Elizabeth Reed challenged Eric like he hadnt been challenged since Duane. Unfortunately these dates and the ticket prices keep me out of these shows.


KWidgeon - 3/28/2013 at 08:44 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
You people actually complain about EC? Communists you are.


With a setlist as tired as that one, I will express my dissatisfaction, absolutely. I would call this the "Clueless Suburban housewifes that like fluffy ballads tour". And I believe in Capitalism, thanks for asking. Have you heard "MEMPHIS"? Here's my review of that: Zzzzzzzzzzz. (Okay, I liked the Gary Moore tune a bit, but overall: Boring).
You sound like a real gem. Wouldn't that be "housewives"? EC for me is the place to be.


That is correct, I should have typed "HousewiVes". My point is that whether it was the 88 tour with Mark Knopfler in his band, or 2006 with Derek touring and playing a bunch of Domino's tunes, EC is at his best when he has someone pushing his guitar playing. I don't see that with Doyle either, which may explain his longevity. With the back catalog EC has, I don't feel the need to go hear I Shot the Sheriff, Wonderful Tonight, Tears in Heaven, etc..., especially with the combination of the cost of a ticket and the fact that he plays so many of the same tunes tour after tour. With consideration to that back catalog, I have heard those tunes too many times, and I think it would be refreshing to hear him mix it up. I think Hello Old Friend is a good example of pulling out at least one tune from his catalog that he hasn't performed live in years. For me it's because I've seen him 20 times over the last 30 years. If you have never or rarely seen him, by all means, go to the show and enjoy. I'm just stating my opinion from my vantage point. And I still think his new CD is boring.


We'll give you a break on the housewives thing, Chitown. You're alright.


KWidgeon - 3/28/2013 at 08:46 PM

quote:
Duluth, GA 3-27-13:

1. Hello Old Friend
2. My Father's Eyes
3. Tell The Truth
4. Gotta Get Over
5. Black Cat Bone
6. Gotta Get Better In A Little While
7. Tempted
8. Badge
9. Driftin'
9A. Lay Down Sally
10. Tears In Heaven
11. Layla
12. Wonderful Tonight
13. How Long
14. Stones In My Passway
15. Love In Vain
16. Crossroads
17. Little Queen Of Spades
18. Cocaine
19. Sunshine Of Your Love
20. High Time We Went

Not bad. I expect the clueless housewives liked it less than I did. I might have missed a song after Tears, as that one had me sprinting for a break.

Best all night was a ripping Gotta Get Better, and the Love in Vain was most excellent w/ a nice Doyle solo and an extended Stainton keys solo. Little Queen was right up there too. Liked the two Squeeze numbers, and EC made sure everyone got some spotlight. EC and Doyle traded vocals on Sunshine, which finally got the crowd on its feet (old crowd; I was right at home!).

Much, much better than '10 when I saw him. Even though it has been sold out for a week or so, a good number of varied quality tix were released today, so check on the day of show and go.

EDIT, added Lay Down Sally per War EagleRK. Forgot that one.

[Edited on 3/28/2013 by Brock]


Glad he's throwing Got To Get Better In A Little While in there once in awhile. I would have loved to hear him do Love in Vain. Little Queen of Spades is also a favorite of mine. It will be interesting to see what he plays at Crossroads this year. I will definitely buy the dvd.


bump827 - 3/28/2013 at 08:55 PM

quote:
quote:
And by the way Rolling Stone would give him a great review even if he sucked. They lauded over the EC tour with Jeff Beck when they barely got anywhere close to each other. Most RS reviews laud "their artists". The last few Bruce Springsteen albums have sucked to me yet they kowtow to him. And I've been a fan since 1973


I think they only gave Old Sock 3 stars, so it wasn't like they were gushing over him.

While I disagree that the last few Springsteen albums have sucked, I do agree that U2, Dylan and Springsteen always have 5 stars reserved for them.


To me Springsteen's writing has suffered as he's aged and enjoyed riches. IMHO he's just not hungry any more and it shows in his writing. Queen of the Supermarket? A song about housewives at Wegmans? Give me a break. His shows in an renga are still enjoyable but no more stadiums. I received Old Sock yesterday, haven't played the LPs yet


IF - 3/29/2013 at 03:12 PM

On another note...


Eric Clapton - The 1960s Review


http://youtu.be/RzKzTZL_w24



chiliD - 3/29/2013 at 08:57 PM

That was a pretty good bio/doc. Is there a 2nd part that delves into the '70s? Ending right when he joins Delaney & Bonnie seems like an odd place to stop, considering the whole Derek & The Dominos thing just a few months later.

A couple of those British guys can get pretty pompous at some points, huh? LOL!


chris - 3/30/2013 at 03:56 AM

For Christmas, the wife surprised me w/ tix to the Charlotte show.

I don't know how (or who) she did it, but she got me 17th row center stage. She got them through TM. I told her that of all the years I bought tix through TM, I never got anything better than mid level or back floor.

I've not been into EC for years. I'm trying to get excited.


bump827 - 3/30/2013 at 10:19 AM

quote:
For Christmas, the wife surprised me w/ tix to the Charlotte show.

I don't know how (or who) she did it, but she got me 17th row center stage. She got them through TM. I told her that of all the years I bought tix through TM, I never got anything better than mid level or back floor.

I've not been into EC for years. I'm trying to get excited.


Have fun and nice seats!


chris - 4/3/2013 at 04:31 AM

Well, the seats were great. The crowd around us... ehhh (I'll touch back on that later).

He played the same set as the original poster listed !!!! except Layla!!! just noticed that.

I give the show a B/B-. Clapton is on cruise control. No risks, no bets. A lot of his sound is that over-processed Fender.

But when he sits down and plays that acoustic- ohhhh baby, that's some sweeeeeet action.

He played "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out".... it was so good. Definitely the highlight for me- personally (a favorite of my mom's- brought back good memories).

But the overall setlist lacked a lot of good tunes. No Badge, LDS... I wanted to hear from the era- Sign Language, Let it Grow, etc.

One MAJOR beef I have with his setlist is that he let some hack keyboard player include two crappy covers- TEMPTED (by the fruit of another) and HOW LONG (has this been going on). Whoa nelly. Those tunes should never be played on the stage with ERIC F'N CLAPTON.

They could have played real songs. Not some classic rock vomit.

OK- back to the crowd around us. For the most part, they were good. But I gotta say- and I'm probably going to get reamed, especially with this message board's demographic- but old white men suck.

Keep your blazer and sh!tty attitude at home. "Sit down!", "Put your camera down!", "Excuse me!".... come on man, it's a F'n concert. Lighten up.

I heard these old men in their mid 60s bitch about everything. They called security because people were dancing in the aisles. I heard someone bitch in the bathroom because someone was lighting up.

Maybe I got around a bad batch. But I want to call my dad up and tell him to never complain about the kids today.


IPowrie - 4/3/2013 at 04:55 AM

quote:
Well, the seats were great. The crowd around us... ehhh (I'll touch back on that later).

He played the same set as the original poster listed !!!! except Layla!!! just noticed that.

I give the show a B/B-. Clapton is on cruise control. No risks, no bets. A lot of his sound is that over-processed Fender.

But when he sits down and plays that acoustic- ohhhh baby, that's some sweeeeeet action.

He played "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out".... it was so good. Definitely the highlight for me- personally (a favorite of my mom's- brought back good memories).

But the overall setlist lacked a lot of good tunes. No Badge, LDS... I wanted to hear from the era- Sign Language, Let it Grow, etc.

One MAJOR beef I have with his setlist is that he let some hack keyboard player include two crappy covers- TEMPTED (by the fruit of another) and HOW LONG (has this been going on). Whoa nelly. Those tunes should never be played on the stage with ERIC F'N CLAPTON.

They could have played real songs. Not some classic rock vomit.

OK- back to the crowd around us. For the most part, they were good. But I gotta say- and I'm probably going to get reamed, especially with this message board's demographic- but old white men suck.

Keep your blazer and sh!tty attitude at home. "Sit down!", "Put your camera down!", "Excuse me!".... come on man, it's a F'n concert. Lighten up.

I heard these old men in their mid 60s bitch about everything. They called security because people were dancing in the aisles. I heard someone bitch in the bathroom because someone was lighting up.

Maybe I got around a bad batch. But I want to call my dad up and tell him to never complain about the kids today.


The crowd reminded me alot of the crowd I was by the last time I saw Bob Dylan. Give me old hippies over these types any day


chuckels - 4/3/2013 at 08:02 PM

Excellent review from Charlotte.

Eric Clapton is still living on blues power

Nobody flew. Nobody danced. Nothing exploded. Nobody changed costumes or leaped out of an illuminated fog bank or lip-synched while performing gymnastic flips.

What happened at Time-Warner Cable Arena Tuesday night was a simple, old-fashioned rock concert that astounded skeptics, satisfied fans and reminded all present of the enduring wizardry of guitarist Eric Clapton, who explored highways and byways from five decades of his catalog.

In human years, Clapton is 68. (His birthday was Saturday.) In guitar years, he’s timeless. Music seems to stream from him the way it did from Ravi Shankar in his old age.

Until Clapton grinned at fellow guitarist Doyle Bramhall II during the final encore, he wore two expressions while he played. Sometimes he turned his eyes down, like a meticulous jeweller at his workbench; sometimes he turned them up and tilted his head back, like a mystic scanning the heavens. Though he sang passionately (and with a clearer voice than he did on the recent “Old Sock” album), his fingers appeared to be following their own paths.

Someone expecting a greatest-hits package might’ve been disappointed: He didn’t play “After Midnight,” “Let It Rain,” “Lay Down Sally” or especially “Layla.” (Does a master chef serve everything he knows how to cook at one meal?)

He opened with a gently acoustic “Hello Old Friend” and closed with the Joe Cocker rave-up “High Time We Went” – doubly apt, because Chris Stainton wrote it with Cocker and now plays a powerfully jazzy piano in Clapton’s band.

A bounty came in between: Depression-era ballads, a rocker from Cream (a jaunty “Sunshine of Your Love”), bits of Derek and the Dominoes (a blazing “Tell the Truth”) and an unmissable Robert Johnson trio: “Stones in My Passway,” “Love in Vain” and a steamy, slightly slowed “Crossroads.”

Clapton shares the stage with good musicians and really shares it. Bramhall made the most of his solos, which were never mere filler. Bassist Willie Weeks and drummer Steve Jordan nailed down a heavy beat. (Jordan might have outgunned Cream’s Ginger Baker on “Sunshine.”) Greg Leisz’ pedal steel guitar gave “My Woman’s Got a Black Cat Bone” extra bluesiness, and backup vocalists Michelle John and Sharon White added unobtrusive weight to Clapton’s vocals.

Paul Carrack, wearing what looked like a Fats Waller derby as he played keyboards, sang two numbers he’d done with Squeeze (“Tempted”) and Ace (“How Long”), while Clapton supplied tasteful solos. These interludes didn’t look like a tired senior citizen taking a brief rest, but like a musician enjoying his cohorts’ skills.

It’s facile to assume a performer’s life must seep into his art, though songs such as “My Father’s Eyes” and “Tears in Heaven” are obviously autobiographical. (Both got tender acoustic treatments Tuesday.)

Yet Clapton’s playing has a serenity I didn’t see when he came though Charlotte 30 years ago. Sobriety and a new family seem to have settled him in recent years, and he plays with seen-it-all strength.

By contrast, the 40-ish musicians of The Wallflowers look like kids. They came on to the Dave Clark Five’s “Glad All Over,” the title of their latest album, and launched into a tight 40-minute set with “The Devil’s Waltz,” one of their strongest songs. (For once, a rock concert began right on time.)

Each number followed the same pattern: A mid-tempo beat, soulful delivery by lead singer Jakob Dylan, build-up to a crescendo with rough-edged guitar and roiling keyboards.

That’s an effective approach, but it’s monochromatic. And the guy coming along behind them was a musical rainbow.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/04/03/3956429/eric-clapton-still-livi ng-on-blues.html



[Edited on 4/3/2013 by chuckels]


bluedad - 4/5/2013 at 02:21 AM

quote:
quote:
Well, the seats were great. The crowd around us... ehhh (I'll touch back on that later).

He played the same set as the original poster listed !!!! except Layla!!! just noticed that.

I give the show a B/B-. Clapton is on cruise control. No risks, no bets. A lot of his sound is that over-processed Fender.

But when he sits down and plays that acoustic- ohhhh baby, that's some sweeeeeet action.

He played "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out".... it was so good. Definitely the highlight for me- personally (a favorite of my mom's- brought back good memories).

But the overall setlist lacked a lot of good tunes. No Badge, LDS... I wanted to hear from the era- Sign Language, Let it Grow, etc.

One MAJOR beef I have with his setlist is that he let some hack keyboard player include two crappy covers- TEMPTED (by the fruit of another) and HOW LONG (has this been going on). Whoa nelly. Those tunes should never be played on the stage with ERIC F'N CLAPTON.

They could have played real songs. Not some classic rock vomit.

OK- back to the crowd around us. For the most part, they were good. But I gotta say- and I'm probably going to get reamed, especially with this message board's demographic- but old white men suck.

Keep your blazer and sh!tty attitude at home. "Sit down!", "Put your camera down!", "Excuse me!".... come on man, it's a F'n concert. Lighten up.

I heard these old men in their mid 60s bitch about everything. They called security because people were dancing in the aisles. I heard someone bitch in the bathroom because someone was lighting up.

Maybe I got around a bad batch. But I want to call my dad up and tell him to never complain about the kids today.


The crowd reminded me alot of the crowd I was by the last time I saw Bob Dylan. Give me old hippies over these types any day


[Edited on 4/5/2013 by bluedad]

I was in Charlotte...
I was in a good crowd. Lots of dancing around me...

[Edited on 4/5/2013 by bluedad]


emr - 4/5/2013 at 03:06 AM

quote:
Best Clapton shows this year will be the one's with The Brothers. The 2009 Beacon shows where Eric tackled Dreams , Elizabeth Reed challenged Eric like he hadnt been challenged since Duane. Unfortunately these dates and the ticket prices keep me out of these shows.


Unfortunately going sat rather than friday; and since Friday is my son's birthday and my daughter is flying in from LA I think this is a battle I will not wine.

agree with you 100% about Clapton. I have often said that unless he is pushed he mails it in. He is not Secretariat; ahead by 20 lengths he stops running. He is more like Affirmed; needing Alydar to push him to greatness. I was at the second Clapton show in 2009; it took him two nights to tackle the challenge of IMOER. It will be interesting to see how far out of his comfort zone (a place he doesn't like to go) he ventures on Friday


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