Thread: Hippie Calendar Word of the Day

dutchoneill - 1/3/2007 at 12:01 PM

Sorry I missed the first two days of 07 , but lets see how this goes...

Jan 3,2007

Uh or Um, I'm Thinking. Should be uttered with an ignorant inflection.


PeterNelson - 1/3/2007 at 01:08 PM

Dutch, if this is one of those page-a-day calendars, it might not have room to go into this kind of detail, but is the slack-jawed "ummm" derived from the tidier British "emmm"?


dutchoneill - 1/3/2007 at 01:27 PM

quote:
Dutch, if this is one of those page-a-day calendars, it might not have room to go into this kind of detail, but is the slack-jawed "ummm" derived from the tidier British "emmm"?


What I posted is what the page a day gave me Peter, sorry can't confirm or deny the relationship between the phrases.


cupofjo - 1/3/2007 at 01:29 PM

UH! What did I do! or UM! I am contemplating the world.


Sang - 1/3/2007 at 02:06 PM

I'm very disappointed that Peter didn't post pictures and 5 links to support his position...


WharfRat - 1/3/2007 at 02:21 PM

oooooohhhmmmmm


LexABB - 1/3/2007 at 02:37 PM

UH?


LexABB - 1/3/2007 at 02:38 PM



UHURHRUHRURRHRURRHRURUHRUHRURH!!!!


dutchoneill - 1/3/2007 at 02:41 PM

OK, the thread has legs, I'll try and post each day.


cupofjo - 1/3/2007 at 04:17 PM

quote:
OK, the thread has legs, I'll try and post each day.




I thought it would


LinnieXX - 1/3/2007 at 04:21 PM

ok, now to really, really, REALLY learn it we need to use it in a sentence.

quote:
Uh or Um, I'm Thinking. Should be uttered with an ignorant inflection.



"Um......yeah, i think this is the beacon, but i'm not sure"


oldcoot - 1/3/2007 at 04:21 PM

I'll always remember the sage advice that Lee gave me once.

"Coot, you've got to take time to stop and smell the patchouli."


Bhawk - 1/3/2007 at 04:54 PM

"Um, like, organic carrots make a much better veggie burrito than um, any of that other, um, processed produce."


lolasdeb - 1/3/2007 at 05:08 PM

lol on topic
bhawk - sounds like shakedown street
'uh, healthy veggie burritos! grilled cheese sandwiches!'


lolasdeb - 1/3/2007 at 05:10 PM

Mr. Hand: Food will be eaten on your time. Why are you continually late for this class, Mr. Spicoli? Why do you shamelessly wasting my time like this?
Jeff Spicoli: Uh, uh... I don't know

[Edited on 1/3/2007 by lolasdeb]


Ayla - 1/4/2007 at 04:02 AM

Um, what time is it?
Uh what day is this?


dutchoneill - 1/4/2007 at 12:30 PM

Thursday Jan 4,2007

Paisley....a popular floral design that adorned clothing worn by both men and women in the hippie era. The design came originally from shawls made in a region near the town of Paisley, Scotland. The creatively horticultural represented elements that formed this design are similar to the surrealistic distortions created in one's mind by psychedlics. Many East Indian cotton bedspreads with this pattern were used for clothing, curtains and wall decorations during the Hippie Era.


cupofjo - 1/4/2007 at 12:59 PM

So does this mean Brad Paisley is a surrealistic distortions created in one's mind by psychedlics!

Can anyone say FLASHBACK


PeterNelson - 1/4/2007 at 01:04 PM

quote:
I'm very disappointed that Peter didn't post pictures and 5 links to support his position...
"........ " when you say that, boy.

......

My Yahoo homepage has a bookmarks (favorites) folder that consists solely of two paisley website links.


lolasdeb - 1/4/2007 at 04:50 PM

Paisley - this describes the decor of my 1st place-of-my-own. And much of the clothing I owned back then, too.


Haisija - 1/4/2007 at 04:53 PM

When I picked up my laundry, thats what the clerk Hop-Sing said because he didn't have a key to the cash register.


lolasdeb - 1/4/2007 at 05:19 PM

quote:
When I picked up my laundry, thats what the clerk Hop-Sing said because he didn't have a key to the cash register.


Ouch. (Wait - I thought Hop-Sing was Ben Cartwright's housekeeper???)


Haisija - 1/4/2007 at 07:03 PM

quote:
Ouch. (Wait - I thought Hop-Sing was Ben Cartwright's housekeeper???)





Yes ma'am , he presses a mighty fine shirt too.

[Edited on 1/4/2007 by Haisija]


dutchoneill - 1/5/2007 at 10:20 AM

Jan 5,2007

Carnaby Street, London

An obscure alley behind the grand shopping thoroughfare of Regent Street. In the late 1960's with its wild boutiques and informal fashions, Carnaby Street became the most popular retail clothing area in London, producing many of the Mod fashions of the 1970's.


MoreCowbell - 1/5/2007 at 02:01 PM

quote:
Thursday Jan 4,2007

Paisley....a popular floral design that adorned clothing worn by both men and women in the hippie era. The design came originally from shawls made in a region near the town of Paisley, Scotland. The creatively horticultural represented elements that formed this design are similar to the surrealistic distortions created in one's mind by psychedlics. Many East Indian cotton bedspreads with this pattern were used for clothing, curtains and wall decorations during the Hippie Era.


.....and neck ties in the 80's


lolasdeb - 1/5/2007 at 07:21 PM

Isn't that Twiggy standing over there next to Mary Quant?...

For some reason Carnaby Street always makes me think of a young Mick Jagger and Marianne Faithful, too.


PeterNelson - 1/5/2007 at 09:04 PM

quote:
Isn't that Twiggy standing over there next to Mary Quant?...
No, Deb, it's the always mod Elwood standing over there next to Twiggy.


lolasdeb - 1/5/2007 at 09:52 PM

quote:
No, Deb, it's the always mod Elwood standing over there next to Twiggy.

Peter, Peter, Peter...LOL (almost forgot she was in BluesBrothers!)


dutchoneill - 1/6/2007 at 12:04 PM

Jan 6,2007, Jan 7,2007

Werner, Jann....Co-founder and editor of Rolling Stone magazine. Jann is greatly responsible for legitimizing rock and roll and alternative music forms in our culture. He, along with Hugh Hefner, represents the most important print media publishing of the hipie era.


cupofjo - 1/6/2007 at 02:57 PM

Trivia: Who was the first person on the cover of Rolling Stone?


heineken515 - 1/6/2007 at 02:59 PM

Was it John Lennon, with the army helmet on his head?


Haisija - 1/6/2007 at 03:01 PM

John Lennon...Do I win front row center Beacon seats for 30th and 31 st ?


PeterNelson - 1/6/2007 at 05:17 PM

I'm not a big fan of Jann Wenner, but you can see him being interviewed a lot in this week's American Masters on PBS. The episode is about photographer Annie Leibovitz, who got in with Rolling Stone near the beginning in San Francisco. There is a lot of interesting film of her and other RS staffers and SF way back in the old days.

cupofjo, Leibovitz didn't shoot that first cover, but she was the photographer of several other famous Lennon photos, such as the one about 1970 with the thick wirerims (below) and the one the day of John's death, where he's curling up naked next to a clothed Yoko (who's interviewed in this show, by the way).

.

Left: Leibovitz said she took this shot basically accidentally while she was checking the light meter.
Right: TomKat, not completely by Leibovitz.


Ms. Leibovitz , of course, was the photographer who was ticking off Duane when she accompanied the Allman Brothers for a couple days in Cali for that story that came out right after Duane got killed. Leibovitz had the idea of having the whole band show off their mushroom tats, and for a second everybody was about to roll up their pants, but Duane said such a fake pose was stupid. To this Leibovitz replied something like, "Not any stupider than getting them in the first place." I can almost imagine the glare from Duane for that. Here's all she ended up with (from donnah's blog):
http://www.doggerel.com/donnah/ABB%20Overpass.jpg

I watched much of this American Masters, though. For a second they did show the one photo Leibovitz took of Duane and Gregg asleep in the station wagon, that's all.


becksbolero - 1/7/2007 at 04:26 AM

quote:
Trivia: Who was the first person on the cover of Rolling Stone?

quote:

Was it John Lennon, with the army helmet on his head?



dutchoneill - 1/7/2007 at 06:03 PM

Rolling Stone, as I recall was actually a newspaper. Not the glossy magazine it morphed into these days.


dutchoneill - 1/8/2007 at 10:29 AM

Jan 8,2007

Down ON....to disapprove of or dislike.

Example: "She's down on macrame'; now she's into candles."


cupofjo - 1/8/2007 at 12:42 PM

quote:
quote:
Jan 8,2007

Down ON....to disapprove of or dislike.

Example: "She's down on macrame'; now she's into candles."



Precede it with the word "go" and it means something entirely different.



WharfRat - 1/8/2007 at 02:04 PM


Ayla - 1/8/2007 at 04:17 PM

You know they're down on me,
Down down down on me baby
Down on me,
I said down!
Oh, oh!
And it looks like everybody in this whole round world
Down on me!!

Thank you very much. we're big brother and the holding company


PeterNelson - 1/8/2007 at 05:34 PM

quote:
quote:
Jan 8,2007

Down ON....to disapprove of or dislike.

Example: "She's down on macrame'; now she's into candles."
Precede it with the word "go" and it means something entirely different.
Strange how that works:

Down on = bad
Go down on = good (depends)

Down with = good
Go down with (as in threat "take down with") = bad

"Let me take you down, 'cause I'm going to . . . " = good


ozzypie - 1/8/2007 at 06:27 PM

Good thread Ed, but I don't believe I'm old enough to participate.


lolasdeb - 1/9/2007 at 12:23 AM

I remember Rolling Stone, the paper - great seeing the pic posted here of the original format.

Re: word of day - Ayla were thinking alike on this one...immediately thought of Janis.


dutchoneill - 1/9/2007 at 11:36 AM

Jan 9,2007

Groove, in a groove or in the groove...the right place. Example: "keep it up, you're in the groove. A jazz trem that progessed into common usage in the counterculture. It may have come from a reference to grooves on a record, indicating that a musical accomplishment has reached the status of being recorded for posterity on a vinyl record.


WharfRat - 1/9/2007 at 02:18 PM

Sang is groovy


lolasdeb - 1/9/2007 at 02:53 PM

quote:
Sang is groovy
is not?
used in a sentence...
"wow, man, groovy."


Ayla - 1/9/2007 at 03:05 PM

For me to ... "get in the groove " ... was to step outside
while in school to burn one.

( take a pause for the cause )

always made school just a little bit better
especially when you had to go to art or gym class after that


lolasdeb - 1/9/2007 at 03:36 PM

quote:
For me to ... "get in the groove " ... was to step outside
while in school to burn one.

LOL...did we go to school together???


LinnieXX - 1/9/2007 at 06:11 PM

quote:
For me to ... "get in the groove " ... was to step outside
while in school to burn one.

( take a pause for the cause )

always made school just a little bit better
especially when you had to go to art or gym class after that


i had first period Cake Decorating and Candy Making for two years it was groovy.

[Edited on 1/9/2007 by LinnieXX]


dutchoneill - 1/10/2007 at 11:48 AM

Jan 10, 2007

"You are hereby directed to present yourself for Armed Forces Physical Examination to the Local Board named above by reporting at...."

These were the dreaded words that began the draft induction notice received by thousands of 18-year-old boys during the Vietnam War. Selective Service and registration requirements for America's young men have served as a backup system to provide manpower to the U.S. Armed Forces for more than 50 years.

I received my priliminary notice for my physical, which meant that once you passed that you were gonna be called in short order. I opted for a stint in the Navy instead of Vietnam.


cupofjo - 1/10/2007 at 12:51 PM

Boy I am glad I never had to do that! I remember filling out the card when I turned 18 though.

I hope we never have to go through that again.


harvey - 1/10/2007 at 01:25 PM

DID SOMEBODY MENTION THE DRAFT .....

They got a building down New York City, it's called Whitehall Street,
where you walk in, you get injected, inspected, detected, infected,
neglected and selected. I went down to get my physical examination one
day, and I walked in, I sat down, got good and drunk the night before, so
I looked and felt my best when I went in that morning. `Cause I wanted to
look like the all-American kid from New York City, man I wanted, I wanted
to feel like the all-, I wanted to be the all American kid from New York,
and I walked in, sat down, I was hung down, brung down, hung up, and all
kinds o' mean nasty ugly things. And I waked in and sat down and they gave
me a piece of paper, said, "Kid, see the phsychiatrist, room 604."

And I went up there, I said, "Shrink, I want to kill. I mean, I wanna, I
wanna kill. Kill. I wanna, I wanna see, I wanna see blood and gore and
guts and veins in my teeth. Eat dead burnt bodies. I mean kill, Kill,
KILL, KILL." And I started jumpin up and down yelling, "KILL, KILL," and
he started jumpin up and down with me and we was both jumping up and down
yelling, "KILL, KILL." And the sargent came over, pinned a medal on me,
sent me down the hall, said, "You're our boy."

Didn't feel too good about it.

Proceeded on down the hall gettin more injections, inspections,
detections, neglections and all kinds of stuff that they was doin' to me
at the thing there, and I was there for two hours, three hours, four
hours, I was there for a long time going through all kinds of mean nasty
ugly things and I was just having a tough time there, and they was
inspecting, injecting every single part of me, and they was leaving no
part untouched. Proceeded through, and when I finally came to the see the
last man, I walked in, walked in sat down after a whole big thing there,
and I walked up and said, "What do you want?" He said, "Kid, we only got
one question. Have you ever been arrested?"

And I proceeded to tell him the story of the Alice's Restaurant Massacre,
with full orchestration and five part harmony and stuff like that .....


Ayla - 1/10/2007 at 01:46 PM


Ayla - 1/10/2007 at 01:52 PM

The drawing...

The first capsule was drawn by Congressman
Alexander Pirnie (R-NY) of the House
Armed Services Committee



December 1, 1969 marked the date of the first draft lottery held since 1942. This drawing determined the order of induction for men born between January 1, 1944 and December 31, 1950. A large glass container held 366 blue plastic balls containing every possible birth date and affecting men between 18 and 26 years old.


dutchoneill - 1/10/2007 at 02:43 PM

When I was on active duty for two months my number was pulled....360

Old news, my miltary service helped me greatly.


dutchoneill - 1/11/2007 at 12:14 PM

Jan 11,2007

Hopper, Dennis 1936 -

actor, director,photographer, and cultural example. he co-wrote and directed Easy Rider, the 1969 independent movie breakthrough. It announced to the Holloywood establishment that the public was ready for low-bufget, socially concious films. Hopper is a versatile actor, director, and wroter, and a poignant photographer.


Ayla - 1/11/2007 at 02:58 PM



"Easy Rider"

I remember seeing this one at the drive-in



From the movie "Blue Velvet"

He portrayed the amyl nitrite-huffing, obscenity-screaming Frank Booth in David Lynch's film Blue Velvet (1986)

What a actor, what a career !


dutchoneill - 1/11/2007 at 03:33 PM

quote:


"Easy Rider"

I remember seeing this one at the drive-in



From the movie "Blue Velvet"

He portrayed the amyl nitrite-huffing, obscenity-screaming Frank Booth in David Lynch's film Blue Velvet (1986)

What a actor, what a career !




Blue Velvet is one of those 'must see' movies, in my opinion. So, disturbing, yet so good.


lolasdeb - 1/11/2007 at 03:52 PM

quote:
Blue Velvet is one of those 'must see' movies, in my opinion. So, disturbing, yet so good.
Most definitely!!!
Re: Dennis ... isn't he also an artist? Seems I saw some of his paintings displayed in an article I read on him once.


PeterNelson - 1/11/2007 at 05:39 PM

He's most recently being seen in some lame TV commercial for some money-managing company, where he's saying "your generation" (boomers) isn't going to "retire" in the old sense. The main lamesters are whoever wrote the commercial, but Dennis loses points for being the spokesman.


dutchoneill - 1/11/2007 at 06:49 PM

quote:
He's most recently being seen in some lame TV commercial for some money-managing company, where he's saying "your generation" (boomers) isn't going to "retire" in the old sense. The main lamesters are whoever wrote the commercial, but Dennis loses points for being the spokesman.


Valuable "Cool" points at that Peter.


LinnieXX - 1/11/2007 at 08:55 PM

Blue Velvet is a classic. David Lynch at his finest, IMHO.


dutchoneill - 1/11/2007 at 09:22 PM


dutchoneill - 1/12/2007 at 12:20 PM

Jan 12,2007

True Hippie....a person who lives by the Golden Rule. True Hippies are evolutionaries, not revolutionaries; we will convince you with words, not weapons. We will not go to war for peace; we will love the world into it, talk people into it, or shame people into it.


Ayla - 1/12/2007 at 04:16 PM



"True Hippies"

quote:

We will convince you with words not weapons.


I'd bet that Oteil & Krishna feel the same way .......... Peace


lolasdeb - 1/12/2007 at 04:40 PM

Great photo, Ayla!


cupofjo - 1/13/2007 at 12:35 AM

quote:
Blue Velvet is a classic. David Lynch at his finest, IMHO.



I have never seen this!


cupofjo - 1/13/2007 at 12:37 AM

quote:
Great photo, Ayla!


I agree


Ayla - 1/13/2007 at 05:30 AM


Thanks all, twas' a great night for sure

Always fun hanging with our fellow Brothers & Sisters !


dutchoneill - 1/13/2007 at 12:23 PM

Jan 13/14, 2007

Keep off the Grass

A sarcastic warning to stay away from marijuana.


Ayla - 1/13/2007 at 04:28 PM



Keep Off The Grass (1969)
This film produced in 1969 as a anti pot smoking propogana film showcases some of the ultra-conservative views that many americans tried to hold on to in the late 1960's (these views have now made a comeback across american life today). Shown in dramatic fashion we see the consequences of using the evil weed!!!!


cupofjo - 1/14/2007 at 09:02 PM

Starin' at the boob tube, turnin' on the big knob
Tryin' to find some life in the waste land
Fin'ly found a program, gonna deal with Mary Jane
Ready for a trip into hate land
Obnoxious Joe comes on the screen
Along with his guest self-righteous Sam
And one more guy who doesn't count
His hair and clothes are too far out

While pushin' back his glasses Sam is sayin' casually
"I was elected by the masses"
And with that in mind he starts to unwind
A vicious attack on the finest of grasses

Well it's evil, wicked, mean and nasty
(Don't step on the grass, Sam)
And it will ruin our fair country
(Don't be such an ass, Sam)
Well, it will hook your Sue and Johnny
(You're so full of bull, Sam)
All will pay that disagree with me
(Please give up you already lost the fight, alright)

Misinformation Sam and Joe
Are feeding to the nation
But the one who didn't count counted them out
By exposing all their false quotations
Faced by a very awkward situation
This is all he'd say to save the day

Well it's evil, wicked, mean and nasty
(Don't step on the grass, Sam)
And it will ruin our fair country
(Don't be such an ass, Sam)
Well, it will hook your Sue and Johnny
(You're so full of bull, Sam)
All will pay that disagree with me
(Please give up you already lost the fight alright)

You waste my coin Sam, all you can
To jail my fellow man
For smoking all the noble weed
You need much more than him
You've been telling lies so long
Some believe they're true
So they close their eyes to things
You have no right to do
Just as soon as you are gone
Hope will start to climb
Please don't stay around too long
You're wasting precious time


dutchoneill - 1/15/2007 at 12:03 PM

Jan 15, 2007

Gloria Steinem...journalist. She went underground and became a Playboy bunny for three weeks to write an expose' that was published in Show magazine in May and June of 1963. Steinnem is one of the creators of Ms. magazine. A preview issue of 300,000 copies was published and sold in January 1972, and the first regular issue apreared in July 1972. A woman of staure and energy who, along with Germanine Greer, became the ideal image of heterosexual feminism to the world.


dutchoneill - 1/16/2007 at 10:58 AM

Jan 16,2007...Concientious Objector

someone who objects to war and the taking of life as a matter of concience based on religious or moral principles. At the beginning of the Vietnam War, the US government recognized COs nly if they could prove membership in areligious organization that adhered to such beliefs or if they had a history of pacifism. In 1966, there were just over 6 COs for every 100 inductees; by 1972, more draftees were given CO status than those who actually joined the service., 130 COs for every 100 inductees.


cupofjo - 1/16/2007 at 12:39 PM

I guess Uncle Ted wouldnt fit this category


dutchoneill - 1/16/2007 at 01:21 PM

quote:
I guess Uncle Ted wouldnt fit this category


Concientious is the key word there.


cupofjo - 1/17/2007 at 01:00 PM

quote:
quote:
I guess Uncle Ted wouldnt fit this category


Concientious is the key word there.



LOL!


dutchoneill - 1/17/2007 at 01:04 PM

Jan 17,2006....."Beautify Americal, Get a Haircut"

a billboard displayed throughout America by an outdoor advertising company. Another failed attempt by the conservative opoulation ti redicule the hippie culture.


cupofjo - 1/17/2007 at 10:58 PM

When did they do that? I do not remember seeing or hearing about that.

I must have been to young.


PeterNelson - 1/18/2007 at 12:40 AM

Yeah (sing the song, brother);
Now if-a six (uh, huh) turned out to be nine,
Oh, I don't mind, I don't mind (uh; well, all right);
If all the hippies cut off all their hair,
Oh, I don't care, oh, I don't care.

Dig:
'Cause I've got my own world to live through and (uh, huh)
And I ain't gonna copy you.

White-collar conservative flashin' down the street,
Pointin' their plastic finger at me, ha!
They're hopin' soon my kind will drop and die, but (uh)
I'm gonna wave my freak flag high,
High!
Oww!


TopDroog - 1/18/2007 at 01:29 AM

Look - all natural, handmade:




cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 02:20 AM

Is that made with hemp oil


Ayla - 1/18/2007 at 03:40 AM



Friday, Mar. 01, 1968

Mysterious Billboard

As billboards go, it's a real stopper—a huge closeup photo of a pimply faced, wild-haired hippie, mounted on a ghastly yellow background and bearing the message, in red and black letters: BEAUTIFY AMERICA, GET A HAIRCUT. The poster has lately appeared on roadsides across the nation, generating no end of speculation about who or what is behind the campaign.

Some citizens of Atlanta, which boasts 80 of the billboards, worry that right-wingers were involved. In Miami, the posters are thought to be the handiwork of an eccentric millionaire; in Lancaster, Ohio, they are signed by the Lancaster Mothers' Association. Alas, though many mothers feel desperate enough to start such a campaign, a Lancaster Mothers' Association does not exist.

The real source is Miami's Donnelly Advertising Co., the giant outdoor ad agency. Donnelly failed to sell the idea to Gillette, but when the agency included a slide of the billboard as comic relief in its sales pitch at last summer's outdoor advertising convention in St. Louis, the boys instantly recognized it as just the thing to stimulate what they like to call "billboard awareness." Donnelly to date has sold 1,500 of the 24-panel posters to billboard owners in all 50 states at $8.50 each.

A Marine battalion commander at Camp Pendleton, Calif., has posted wall-size copies in his unit's barracks "as an inspiration to our troops," and residents of Shreveport, La., are thinking of having bumper stickers made up along similar lines. As for Donnelly, it is planning to start pasting them on its own billboards this week, and the agency's John Donnelly Jr. knows exactly where he wants the first one to go: Harvard Square.



lolasdeb - 1/18/2007 at 03:46 AM

quote:
Is that made with hemp oil
Per Today show, Hemp is going to be heavily marketed as the new health food of the year.


Ayla - thanks for finding that billboard. I can remember the beautify america schtick used in vain attempt to demean hippies (like any of us cared...this just proved a point about the false ideals being spouted by the establishment).


becksbolero - 1/18/2007 at 04:22 AM

quote:






She asks me why
I'm just a hairy guy
I'm hairy noon and night
Hair that's a fright
I'm hairy high and low
Don't ask me why
Don't know
It's not for lack of break
Like the Grateful Dead
Darling

Gimme head with hair
Long beautiful hair
Shining, gleaming,
Streaming, flaxen, waxen

Give me down to there hair
Shoulder length or longer
Here baby, there mama
Everywhere daddy daddy

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair

Let it fly in the breeze
And get caught in the trees
Give a home to the fleas in my hair
A home for fleas
A hive for bees
A nest for birds
There ain't no words
For the beauty, the splendor, the wonder
Of my...

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair

I want it long, straight, curly, fuzzy
Snaggy, shaggy, ratty, matty
Oily, greasy, fleecy
Shining, gleaming, streaming
Flaxen, waxen
Knotted, polka-dotted
Twisted, beaded, braided
Powdered, flowered, and confettied
Bangled, tangled, spangled, and spaghettied!

Oh say can you see
My eyes if you can
Then my hair's too short

Down to here
Down to there
Down to where
It stops by itself

They'll be ga ga at the go go
When they see me in my toga
My toga made of blond
Brilliantined
Biblical hair

My hair like Jesus wore it
Hallelujah I adore it
Hallelujah Mary loved her son
Why don't my mother love me?

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair



PeterNelson - 1/18/2007 at 09:41 AM

quote:
Look - all natural, handmade:




Mmmm . . . I'd like a box of those strawberry HoHos in the lower left!


dutchoneill - 1/18/2007 at 11:49 AM

Jan 18,2007....Hitch

a problem. Example: "hey, we got a hitch in the program. No Moolah, no movie."
Short for Hitchhiker


cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 12:01 PM

quote:


Friday, Mar. 01, 1968

Mysterious Billboard

As billboards go, it's a real stopper—a huge closeup photo of a pimply faced, wild-haired hippie, mounted on a ghastly yellow background and bearing the message, in red and black letters: BEAUTIFY AMERICA, GET A HAIRCUT. The poster has lately appeared on roadsides across the nation, generating no end of speculation about who or what is behind the campaign.

Some citizens of Atlanta, which boasts 80 of the billboards, worry that right-wingers were involved. In Miami, the posters are thought to be the handiwork of an eccentric millionaire; in Lancaster, Ohio, they are signed by the Lancaster Mothers' Association. Alas, though many mothers feel desperate enough to start such a campaign, a Lancaster Mothers' Association does not exist.

The real source is Miami's Donnelly Advertising Co., the giant outdoor ad agency. Donnelly failed to sell the idea to Gillette, but when the agency included a slide of the billboard as comic relief in its sales pitch at last summer's outdoor advertising convention in St. Louis, the boys instantly recognized it as just the thing to stimulate what they like to call "billboard awareness." Donnelly to date has sold 1,500 of the 24-panel posters to billboard owners in all 50 states at $8.50 each.

A Marine battalion commander at Camp Pendleton, Calif., has posted wall-size copies in his unit's barracks "as an inspiration to our troops," and residents of Shreveport, La., are thinking of having bumper stickers made up along similar lines. As for Donnelly, it is planning to start pasting them on its own billboards this week, and the agency's John Donnelly Jr. knows exactly where he wants the first one to go: Harvard Square.





I was definetly to young to remember that. I was only 2!


cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 12:06 PM

quote:
quote:
Is that made with hemp oil
Per Today show, Hemp is going to be heavily marketed as the new health food of the year.





The seeds have a lot nutrition. Essential amino acids and fatty acids.

f it wasnt for the petroleum companies this all would all be legal.


cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 12:11 PM

quote:
Jan 18,2007....Hitch

a problem. Example: "hey, we got a hitch in the program. No Moolah, no movie."
Short for Hitchhiker



I thought Hitch was a match maker

I used to hitchhike all over the place when I was younger. You dont see many any more. I have picked up a few along the way. Never if my family is in the car. I hate to think that way but this world is not what use to be.


dutchoneill - 1/18/2007 at 12:21 PM

quote:
quote:
Jan 18,2007....Hitch

a problem. Example: "hey, we got a hitch in the program. No Moolah, no movie."
Short for Hitchhiker



I thought Hitch was a match maker

I used to hitchhike all over the place when I was younger. You dont see many any more. I have picked up a few along the way. Never if my family is in the car. I hate to think that way but this world is not what use to be.


Will Smith right?

I never hitchhiked, but I have given some rides.


Ayla - 1/18/2007 at 03:15 PM

Jan 18,2007....Hitch

"Hey man, can I hitch a ride down the road with you?"

I was a big hitchhiker between 1969 to 1973.
Turned 16 in 73 and got my own car then.

on another note:



Looks like a bunch of bullet holes in the sign


cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 04:20 PM

quote:
Jan 18,2007....Hitch

"Hey man, can I hitch a ride down the road with you?"

I was a big hitchhiker between 1969 to 1973.
Turned 16 in 73 and got my own car then.

on another note:



Looks like a bunch of bullet holes in the sign



cupofjo - 1/18/2007 at 04:21 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Jan 18,2007....Hitch

a problem. Example: "hey, we got a hitch in the program. No Moolah, no movie."
Short for Hitchhiker



I thought Hitch was a match maker

I used to hitchhike all over the place when I was younger. You dont see many any more. I have picked up a few along the way. Never if my family is in the car. I hate to think that way but this world is not what use to be.


Will Smith right?

I never hitchhiked, but I have given some rides.


You are correct sir!


lolasdeb - 1/18/2007 at 05:12 PM

quote:
I never hitchhiked, but I have given some rides.
I'll admit - used to 'hitch' all the time back in the late 60's/early70's during periods when I didn't have a car for one reason or another. Also, picked up my share of hitch hikers. Was lucky to never have anything bad happen (although I did have an incident once when I realized the driver whose car I had entered was a sicko and I jumped out of the car as soon as possible - last hitch for me). I would not want my kids doing this today, though - just seems like there are so many MORE wierdos and dangerous people walking around today.


PeterNelson - 1/19/2007 at 06:33 AM

Deb, I hitched occasionally in the mid- to late '70s, basically up and down one particular interstate. I sometimes hitched elsewhere out of town, but never in town, since you can cover half the community by walking just an hour.

I was going to say, though, that there were plenty of weirdos out there back then! I was invited to do unsavory things, but I was never threatened or hindered from being dropped off when I wanted out.

One guy on the interstate, though--almost as soon as I got in the car, he started raving on and on about all the trouble he was in with the army (Fort Bragg, I think it was) and about his going AWOL yesterday and driving all day from Georgia and speeding (on speed). Then it got worse, as the reason he was heading northwest was to kill his wife and her lover in Iowa. He was going to catch them and shoot them both.

"You don't believe me?!" he yelled as I was just sitting there, pretty silently taking this in. "Well, look at this!" he yelled as he reached under the driver's seat. I thought he was going to pull out a gun or something, but instead his hand came up clutching a traffic citation and some other papers showing all the trouble he had gotten in at his army base the past week. (To his credit, later he did reach under there and pull me out a warm can of beer.)

We smoked, and I kinda talked him down a little bit, mostly by talking about the daughter they shared and how a girl needs a mommy and how she needs her daddy to be around. But then we got stopped by the state police for speeding (mph). My driver nervously said to me he couldn't give them his I.D., which I understood, and quick--I should give my driver's license to him (before the days of photo drivers' licenses).

You might think this would be a good opportunity for me to get out of the car and even report him to the police. I had all this pot with me, though, and I didn't want the police to have any reason to look for it, any trouble with the driver. So, I slipped him my license before the cop got to his window, and "I" got the speeding ticket. I think the driver gave me about $20 cash, which didn't cover half the ticket.

Well, this had gotten him all freaked out again, and once we got going again, he vented by going off about his cheating wife some more. So, I had to talk him down some more. Besides the 20-minute stop for the ticket, I was in that car with him for about 2 hours--intense! An AWOL speed freak with murderous intentions!

By the time we parted, he agreed he wasn't going to kill them, but he was going to "mess them up real bad" and teach them a lesson. I was checking the papers for stories out of Iowa for a few days but didn't see anything.

[Edited on 2007.1.19 by PeterNelson]


dutchoneill - 1/19/2007 at 11:58 AM

Jan 19,2007....Helter-Skelter

a very old term of unknown origin mreaning disorganized or without a plan. Used in the lyrics of a Beatle song that came to the attention of Charles Manson, an ex-con and dictatorial leader of a small comune in Southern California. When Manson's followers, on his orders killed actress Sharon Tate and fout others in a house in the Hollywood Hills, the words helter-skelter were found written on the refrigerator in a victim's blood.


Boy, I rememebr those days, the insanity around this whole mess. A few of us got completely engrossed in two books, The Family and Helter Skelter by Vincent Bouglosi, the later being his experience as the prosecutor of the Family. Cap that with a trip cross country the following summer to some of those Southern California areas and we were sufficiently spooked out by the whole thing.


cupofjo - 1/19/2007 at 12:34 PM

Helter-Skelter is a name of an amusement park slide in England. That is where Paul McCartney came up with that song. I wonder if they still have these over there. I will have to ask Colin.

When I get to the bottom
I go back to the top of the slide
Where I stop and turn
and I go for a ride
Till I get to the bottom and I see you again
Yeah, yeah, yeah


As for Manson he is on sick man. I remember reading the book. It really grossed me out but was fascinated at the same time!


harvey - 1/19/2007 at 01:49 PM

We sure do Rob ...



After whizzing down the slide around the outside of the tower you arive at the bottom somewhat dizzy and disoriented, hence the other meaning of the term.



[Edited on 1/19/2007 by harvey]


Ayla - 1/19/2007 at 03:44 PM



Clinging on to hessian mats and spiralling down fairground slides. These slides began appearing at British fairs around the turn of the 20th century



As for Manson & his Helter Skelter connection .... sick


WharfRat - 1/19/2007 at 03:44 PM

quote:
.Helter-Skelter



lolasdeb - 1/19/2007 at 06:17 PM

quote:
Helter-Skelter
I remember this was on the juke box in the student lounge when I was in high school (got played a lot). But the later Manson family fiasco is what I usually think of when I hear the term now. Recall reading the many news accounts, seeing the televised accounts of the hideous murders out in CA then the capture of Charles & his minions, the trial, and the show it turned into with shaved heads and swastikas etched into foreheads. I read Bugliosi's book - thought he did a good job of relating all that happened then. To see Manson today - he's still as crazy as ever...this is a broken individual beyond any kind of fixing. I saw the 3 girls who where sentenced for their parts in the murders on a television program not long ago and although I deplore their actions (I can't imagine anybody having enough control over my thinking to drive me to do something so dispicable) I had to pity them the lives they've made. They all seem to be intelligent women and I can only wonder at their lives had they not gotten involved with a man named Charlie (who they despise now). I also think they are right where they need to be in prison - murder is murder and we all have choices.


dutchoneill - 1/20/2007 at 02:20 PM

Jan 20-21, 2007....Grip or Get a Grip

take control. Possibly comes from "get a hold of yourself".
Example: "So Snookie left you; get a grip, life goes on"


cupofjo - 1/20/2007 at 02:27 PM

I have said this many times


Ayla - 1/20/2007 at 05:55 PM

quote:
I have said this many times


Yup me too, still do. Some of the youngsters at work just gimme a look

But then they all know that " I'm just stuck in the 70's "

Ole' Hippy Chick


cupofjo - 1/20/2007 at 10:22 PM

quote:
quote:
I have said this many times


Yup me too, still do. Some of the youngsters at work just gimme a look

But then they all know that " I'm just stuck in the 70's "

Ole' Hippy Chick





dutchoneill - 1/22/2007 at 10:20 AM

Jan 22,2007....Cooke, Sam 1/22/1936- 12/11/1964

singer/songwriter whose gospel/soul background and sweet voice made his recordings some of the most romantic moments of our lives


Ayla - 1/22/2007 at 04:18 PM



"It isn't what you sing that is so important", said Sam's father, "but rather the fact that God gave you a good voice to use. He must want you to make people happy by singing, so go ahead and do so."

With these words of encouragement, he did just that. At the height of his fame in the gospel world and with the screams of believers raising him up and being raised up by him, Sam left it all behind.


cupofjo - 1/22/2007 at 10:40 PM

What a voice he had!


cupofjo - 1/22/2007 at 10:42 PM

Thinking, did they ever resolve that shooting? That was really strange how that alll came about!


dutchoneill - 1/23/2007 at 11:58 AM

Jan 23,2007...Declaration of Indian Purpose

was presented at the American Indian Conference in Chicago in 1967, organized by the National Congress of American Indians. It beagan, "We....have a right to choose our own way of life. Since our Indian culture is slowly being absorbed by American society, we believe we have a responsibility of preserving our precious heritage...."


Ayla - 1/23/2007 at 12:56 PM

“What we ask of America is not charity”

One of the most significant events in 20th-century Indian history—the American Indian Chicago Conference. Organized by the late Sol Tax, Professor in Anthropology, the conference took place at the University Of Chicago in June 1961

In the early 1950s, the federal government began “terminating” tribes, no longer recognizing them as sovereign governments. Tax, a top academic expert on American Indians, was asked to make policy suggestions at this critical time, known as the “termination period.”

Tax insisted that Native Americans, not he, should be consulted. He invited more than 400 representatives from 90 tribal groups to Chicago to help prepare the “Declaration of Indian Purpose,” the first unified position statement on Native Americans’ relationship to the U.S. government

“Tax had respect for the integrity of Native American communities during the era when the idea of the melting pot was popular,” said Terry Straus, Professor in the Master of Arts Program in Social Science and a former doctoral student of Tax’s. “As an Indian view of Indian policy, the declaration has influenced American Indian affairs ever since.”


PeterNelson - 1/23/2007 at 02:11 PM

Speaking of American Indians in Chicago, Dutch, this past weekend I had the opportunity to shed a little light on unfortunate Illinois history for my brothers' kids. We were driving around Morris, on the Illinois River, and went to a cemetery to find the boulder marking the grave of Chief Shabbona, whose name the kids knew from where they live, up closer to Chicago, because of the names of a state park and the local scout council or something. I didn't give all the following history, but . . .

In 1800 the Potawatomi were the main Indians around the Chicago area (and through much of northern Illinois), sharing the land with only a handful of traders at the mouth of the Chicago River, where it empties into Lake Michigan (much closer to Michigan Ave. than currently). In 1803 the U.S. Army built Fort Dearborn on a hill overlooking the mouth of the river.

During the War of 1812, the Potawatomi became strongly allied with the British and came to the fort and demanded that the inhabitants leave. As the entire populace of the fort and environs, plus friendly Miami Indians--148 people in all--was being escorted south along the lake by some 500 Potawatomi warriors, they were set upon by the warriors. Many were massacred and mutilated on the spot (near the later Prairie Avenue); or taken prisoner, tortured all night, and then killed; or taken or sold into slavery. A few palefaces were immediately let go (like because of their relation to traders the Indians had liked), but over half the non-Native Americans and most of the Miami had been killed.
http://www.galafilm.com/1812/e/events/ftdearborn.html
http://www.prairieghosts.com/dearborn.html

The fort was rebuilt and remanned the next year. In the teens and twenties, more and more white people came out to the Chicago area, and of course some of them didn't feel like respecting the treaties between the Potawatomi and the U.S. gov't., moving out from Chicago to hunt and farm in Indian territory. This led to many small-scale incidents between the trespassers and the Potawatomi-Ottawa-Chippewa confederation, often getting fatal. The Indians naturally felt like they had to do something to defend their land, and the whites felt that the savagery of the Indians (the torture and mutilations) rendered any agreements with them void. Eventually, the incidents became large scale, culminating in the Black Hawk War (1832), when the Sauk and Fox people, who had been forced across the Mississippi, came back into Illinois.

Shabbona was an Ottawa chief who had become friendlier with the white interlopers than the other chiefs of the confederation. At the time of the Black Hawk War (1832), he warned the white people of impending attacks and otherwise helped out the settlers and even troops trying to move through the land. (I'm not sure how many Ottawa-Potawatomi-Chippewa were still left in Illinois when the Sauk and Fox had been forced out, and I don't think they were militarily allied, particularly, with the Sauk and Fox at all.)

.

This was considered treason by the rest of the Potawatomi-Ottawa-Chippewa, and they shunned Shabbona. Out of gratitude and to protect him, the people of the fledgling town of Morris took him in and even set him up as a homesteader on some land nearby. He died there in the 1850s and was buried with honors in Evergreen Cemetery. Several members of his family, including women (daughters?) named Mary, are also buried near the boulder.
http://www.canalcor.org/Evergreen.html
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/700-799/nb748.htm


This is about 3-1/2 paragraphs more than what I told my brother's kids. The older nephew seemed surprised and concerned that this had occurred in Illinois, which he might have felt was, since it's not part of the Wild West, also not part of the conflict between white and red man running from east to west throughout most of American history.


cupofjo - 1/23/2007 at 10:06 PM

White man screwed the Indians good but they are getting the last laugh!

We got them drunk took their land. Put them in reservations(which is a nice word for detenton camp) and kept our eye on them. Tried to conform them to our ways and if they rebelled we killed them. (I use we as a general term for white man)

Now Indians finally found something to do with the useless land. They built casinos to get white man drunk and take his money. The money they get from the revenue they purchase whiteman's land. The Indians are big givers to be influential in the goverment.

Funny how they turned it around and used the same tactics legally!

I for one am happy for them.


dutchoneill - 1/23/2007 at 10:51 PM

quote:
Speaking of American Indians in Chicago, Dutch, this past weekend I had the opportunity to shed a little light on unfortunate Illinois history for my brothers' kids. We were driving around Morris, on the Illinois River, and went to a cemetery to find the boulder marking the grave of Chief Shabbona, whose name the kids knew from where they live, up closer to Chicago, because of the names of a state park and the local scout council or something. I didn't give all the following history, but . . .

In 1800 the Potawatomi were the main Indians around the Chicago area (and through much of northern Illinois), sharing the land with only a handful of traders at the mouth of the Chicago River, where it empties into Lake Michigan (much closer to Michigan Ave. than currently). In 1803 the U.S. Army built Fort Dearborn on a hill overlooking the mouth of the river.

During the War of 1812, the Potawatomi became strongly allied with the British and came to the fort and demanded that the inhabitants leave. As the entire populace of the fort and environs, plus friendly Miami Indians--148 people in all--was being escorted south along the lake by some 500 Potawatomi warriors, they were set upon by the warriors. Many were massacred and mutilated on the spot (near the later Prairie Avenue); or taken prisoner, tortured all night, and then killed; or taken or sold into slavery. A few palefaces were immediately let go (like because of their relation to traders the Indians had liked), but over half the non-Native Americans and most of the Miami had been killed.
http://www.galafilm.com/1812/e/events/ftdearborn.html
http://www.prairieghosts.com/dearborn.html

The fort was rebuilt and remanned the next year. In the teens and twenties, more and more white people came out to the Chicago area, and of course some of them didn't feel like respecting the treaties between the Potawatomi and the U.S. gov't., moving out from Chicago to hunt and farm in Indian territory. This led to many small-scale incidents between the trespassers and the Potawatomi-Ottawa-Chippewa confederation, often getting fatal. The Indians naturally felt like they had to do something to defend their land, and the whites felt that the savagery of the Indians (the torture and mutilations) rendered any agreements with them void. Eventually, the incidents became large scale, culminating in the Black Hawk War (1832), when the Sauk and Fox people, who had been forced across the Mississippi, came back into Illinois.

Shabbona was an Ottawa chief who had become friendlier with the white interlopers than the other chiefs of the confederation. At the time of the Black Hawk War (1832), he warned the white people of impending attacks and otherwise helped out the settlers and even troops trying to move through the land. (I'm not sure how many Ottawa-Potawatomi-Chippewa were still left in Illinois when the Sauk and Fox had been forced out, and I don't think they were militarily allied, particularly, with the Sauk and Fox at all.)

.

This was considered treason by the rest of the Potawatomi-Ottawa-Chippewa, and they shunned Shabbona. Out of gratitude and to protect him, the people of the fledgling town of Morris took him in and even set him up as a homesteader on some land nearby. He died there in the 1850s and was buried with honors in Evergreen Cemetery. Several members of his family, including women (daughters?) named Mary, are also buried near the boulder.
http://www.canalcor.org/Evergreen.html
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/700-799/nb748.htm


This is about 3-1/2 paragraphs more than what I told my brother's kids. The older nephew seemed surprised and concerned that this had occurred in Illinois, which he might have felt was, since it's not part of the Wild West, also not part of the conflict between white and red man running from east to west throughout most of American history.


Thanks for sharing that Peter, history only locals would know. What a sad chapter in the history of this country.


dutchoneill - 1/23/2007 at 10:52 PM

quote:
White man screwed the Indians good but they are getting the last laugh!

We got them drunk took their land. Put them in reservations(which is a nice word for detenton camp) and kept our eye on them. Tried to conform them to our ways and if they rebelled we killed them. (I use we as a general term for white man)

Now Indians finally found something to do with the useless land. They built casinos to get white man drunk and take his money. The money they get from the revenue they purchase whiteman's land. The Indians are big givers to be influential in the goverment.

Funny how they turned it around and used the same tactics legally!

I for one am happy for them.


Good stuff Rob, thanks.


PeterNelson - 1/24/2007 at 05:15 AM

Dutch, Ayla, and Cupofrob, it's interesting how things have changed for Native Americans since those conferences. I knew they were very marginalized, but I didn't realize their tribal identities were systematically being "terminated" like that.

The current situation isn't ideal, but it represents the pendulum swinging back their way, at least. The whole issue of tribal identity is key because of the stakes (no pun intended) involved in being the member of a tribe and getting a piece of the casino profits. So, if in the '50s many tribes were nearly being written off as extinct, this reflected the fact that whole groups (some of the small ones) had in fact died off or lost all their purity by intermarriage with other Native Americans or others.

Now, with membership in a profitable "minor" tribe being highly sought, some individuals have been stepping forward with proof of 1/8 or 1/16 blood or whatever it takes to be called a member--and suing the tribe if it won't recognize them. The language may be gone, most of the tribe's unique cultural practices may be gone, but the desire to cash in is ensuring that the name and at least part of its legacy will live on. That's a good thing--a safety net preventing extinction and forgetting.

_____

Black Hawk War

A couple more things about pushing the Native Americans out of Illinois. Thanks for bearing with me as I read up on it and try to get details straightened out.
1. I should have mentioned that Morris is about 60 miles SW of Chicago (also see caption to second map below).

2. Participating in the Black Hawk War was perhaps Abraham Lincoln's first notable deed outside his own little towns. He was 23 and not yet postmaster of New Salem, outside Springfield. So, being made captain of a little band of militia sent up north to fight the Sauk and Fox was his first "official" leadership role. As it turned out, though, Lincoln didn't see any action, because the army and other militias had already chased the Native Americans--the entire tribes, not just the warriors--out of IL and up into Wisconsin, where they pretty well slaughtered most of them.

The following excerpts from a website show the whites' brutality in that campaign.

{July 21} Along the trail {catching up to the tribes NW of modern Madison, WI}, the militiamen also found dozens of Sauks and Foxes, mostly old people and children who were suffering from starvation. Some of them were already dead; the rest were quickly killed. . . .

.

Left: "Michigan Territory" on map is modern Wisconsin. Black Hawk led his people from banishment in Iowa, back to their old land in western Illinois, then got chased up into Wisconsin.
Right: Morris, IL, is 22 miles E of Ottawa.

Simplified map showing flight, pursuit, and battle sites:
http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/fimage/blackhawk/bhw2.php?id=2310

Even though Black Hawk's band had made it across the {Wisconsin} river, the Battle of Wisconsin Heights clearly had a devastating impact. Estimates of the Sauk and Fox dead--either killed in the battle or drowned while crossing the Wisconsin--reached as high as 70. Dodge reported that his Winnebago scouts and his and Henry's militiamen had taken nearly 40 Sauk and Fox scalps after the battle. In contrast, the militiamen had suffered just 1 dead along with 7 or 8 wounded. . . .

{August 1} Under a white flag, Black Hawk waded out into the {Mississippi} river {near the mouth of Wisconsin's Bad Axe River, across from the modern Iowa-Minnesota border} and tried, once again, to surrender. As at Stillman's Run {IL} and Wisconsin Heights, however, the soldiers could not understand him. After ten or fifteen minutes of failed communications, the soldiers on the {steamship} Warrior opened fire on the unprepared Sauks and Foxes. . . .

{August 2} The warriors continued to fight {still near Bad Axe}, hoping to allow time for more of the women and children to cross the {Mississippi} river. Just as Atkinson's troops pushed them {the warriors} back toward the river, the refueled Warrior returned and began firing its cannon into them from behind.

{The rest of this could be boldfaced for special inhumanity.}
The slaughter on the eastern {WI} bank of the river continued for eight hours. The soldiers shot at anyone--man, woman, or child--who ran for cover or tried to swim across the river. They shot women who were swimming with children on their backs; they shot wounded swimmers who were almost certain to drown anyway.
{I've swum in the Mississippi not far from there, and the river is already pretty wide and has a very strong current--it alarmed me.}
Other women and children were killed as they tried to surrender. The soldiers scalped most of the dead bodies. From the backs of some of the dead, they cut long strips of flesh for razor strops.

Of the roughly 400 Native Americans at the battle {of Bad Axe}, most were killed (though many of their bodies were never found), some escaped across the river {must've mostly been in boats and rafts, though some swimmers could've made it}, and a few were taken prisoner. Of the 150 or so who crossed the river on August 1 and 2, moreover, few survived for long. Sioux warriors, acting in support of the army, tracked down most of them within a few weeks. 68 scalps, many from women, and 22 Sauk and Fox prisoners were brought by the Sioux to Joseph M. Street, the federal agent for the Winnebagoes at Prairie du Chien {WI, old French trading settlement, and by then American outpost, 30 mi. south of Bad Axe} in late August.
http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/blackhawk/page2c.html

{I'm glad Lincoln had as little to do with this as he did.}


dutchoneill - 1/24/2007 at 11:55 AM

Jan 24,2007...Women's Liberation

the modern women's suffrage movment of the early 1960's, whose goals were to ensure access to abortion, equal pay for equal work for women, and tax-supported childcare centers. Their goal was to reach a place of equlaity with men. The movement was exaemplified by The National Organizatin of Women.


cupofjo - 1/24/2007 at 11:56 AM

Peter that is a horrendous part of our history that needs told and not forgotten.

Thanks again for sharing that with us. Every part of the US has similar stories to share just like that Very sad.


Ayla - 1/24/2007 at 03:52 PM

The National Organization for Women's 1966 Statement of Purpose

NOTICE: This is a historic document, which was adopted at NOW's first National Conference in Washington, D.C. on October 29, 1966. The words are those of the 1960s, and do not reflect current language or NOW's current priorities.

We, men and women who hereby constitute ourselves as the National Organization for Women, believe that the time has come for a new movement toward true equality for all women in America, and toward a fully equal partnership of the sexes, as part of the world-wide revolution of human rights now taking place within and beyond our national borders.

The purpose of NOW is to take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, exercising all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men.

We believe the time has come to move beyond the abstract argument, discussion and symposia over the status and special nature of women which has raged in America in recent years; the time has come to confront, with concrete action, the conditions that now prevent women from enjoying the equality of opportunity and freedom of choice which is their right, as individual Americans, and as human beings.

NOW is dedicated to the proposition that women, first and foremost, are human beings, who, like all other people in our society, must have the chance to develop their fullest human potential. We believe that women can achieve such equality only by accepting to the full the challenges and responsibilities they share with all other people in our society, as part of the decision-making mainstream of American political, economic and social life.

We organize to initiate or support action, nationally, or in any part of this nation, by individuals or organizations, to break through the silken curtain of prejudice and discrimination against women in government, industry, the professions, the churches, the political parties, the judiciary, the labor unions, in education, science, medicine, law, religion and every other field of importance in American society.

Enormous changes taking place in our society make it both possible and urgently necessary to advance the unfinished revolution of women toward true equality, now. With a life span lengthened to nearly 75 years it is no longer either necessary or possible for women to devote the greater part of their lives to child- rearing; yet childbearing and rearing which continues to be a most important part of most women's lives -- still is used to justify barring women from equal professional and economic participation and advance.

Today's technology has reduced most of the productive chores which women once performed in the home and in mass-production industries based upon routine unskilled labor. This same technology has virtually eliminated the quality of muscular strength as a criterion for filling most jobs, while intensifying American industry's need for creative intelligence. In view of this new industrial revolution created by automation in the mid-twentieth century, women can and must participate in old and new fields of society in full equality -- or become permanent outsiders.

Despite all the talk about the status of American women in recent years, the actual position of women in the United States has declined, and is declining, to an alarming degree throughout the 1950's and 60's. Although 46.4% of all American women between the ages of 18 and 65 now work outside the home, the overwhelming majority -- 75% -- are in routine clerical, sales, or factory jobs, or they are household workers, cleaning women, hospital attendants. About two-thirds of Negro women workers are in the lowest paid service occupations. Working women are becoming increasingly -- not less -- concentrated on the bottom of the job ladder. As a consequence full-time women workers today earn on the average only 60% of what men earn, and that wage gap has been increasing over the past twenty-five years in every major industry group. In 1964, of all women with a yearly income, 89% earned under $5,000 a year; half of all full-time year round women workers earned less than $3,690; only 1.4% of full-time year round women workers had an annual income of $10,000 or more.

Further, with higher education increasingly essential in today's society, too few women are entering and finishing college or going on to graduate or professional school. Today, women earn only one in three of the B.A.'s and M.A.'s granted, and one in ten of the Ph.D.'s.

In all the professions considered of importance to society, and in the executive ranks of industry and government, women are losing ground. Where they are present it is only a token handful. Women comprise less than 1% of federal judges; less than 4% of all lawyers; 7% of doctors. Yet women represent 51% of the U.S. population. And, increasingly, men are replacing women in the top positions in secondary and elementary schools, in social work, and in libraries -- once thought to be women's fields.

Official pronouncements of the advance in the status of women hide not only the reality of this dangerous decline, but the fact that nothing is being done to stop it. The excellent reports of the President's Commission on the Status of Women and of the State Commissions have not been fully implemented. Such Commissions have power only to advise. They have no power to enforce their recommendation; nor have they the freedom to organize American women and men to press for action on them. The reports of these commissions have, however, created a basis upon which it is now possible to build. Discrimination in employment on the basis of sex is now prohibited by federal law, in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. But although nearly one-third of the cases brought before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission during the first year dealt with sex discrimination and the proportion is increasing dramatically, the Commission has not made clear its intention to enforce the law with the same seriousness on behalf of women as of other victims of discrimination. Many of these cases were Negro women, who are the victims of double discrimination of race and sex. Until now, too few women's organizations and official spokesmen have been willing to speak out against these dangers facing women. Too many women have been restrained by the fear of being called `feminist." There is no civil rights movement to speak for women, as there has been for Negroes and other victims of discrimination. The National Organization for Women must therefore begin to speak.

WE BELIEVE that the power of American law, and the protection guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution to the civil rights of all individuals, must be effectively applied and enforced to isolate and remove patterns of sex discrimination, to ensure equality of opportunity in employment and education, and equality of civil and political rights and responsibilities on behalf of women, as well as for Negroes and other deprived groups.

We realize that women's problems are linked to many broader questions of social justice; their solution will require concerted action by many groups. Therefore, convinced that human rights for all are indivisible, we expect to give active support to the common cause of equal rights for all those who suffer discrimination and deprivation, and we call upon other organizations committed to such goals to support our efforts toward equality for women.

WE DO NOT ACCEPT the token appointment of a few women to high-level positions in government and industry as a substitute for serious continuing effort to recruit and advance women according to their individual abilities. To this end, we urge American government and industry to mobilize the same resources of ingenuity and command with which they have solved problems of far greater difficulty than those now impeding the progress of women.

WE BELIEVE that this nation has a capacity at least as great as other nations, to innovate new social institutions which will enable women to enjoy the true equality of opportunity and responsibility in society, without conflict with their responsibilities as mothers and homemakers. In such innovations, America does not lead the Western world, but lags by decades behind many European countries. We do not accept the traditional assumption that a woman has to choose between marriage and motherhood, on the one hand, and serious participation in industry or the professions on the other. We question the present expectation that all normal women will retire from job or profession for 10 or 15 years, to devote their full time to raising children, only to reenter the job market at a relatively minor level. This, in itself, is a deterrent to the aspirations of women, to their acceptance into management or professional training courses, and to the very possibility of equality of opportunity or real choice, for all but a few women. Above all, we reject the assumption that these problems are the unique responsibility of each individual woman, rather than a basic social dilemma which society must solve. True equality of opportunity and freedom of choice for women requires such practical, and possible innovations as a nationwide network of child-care centers, which will make it unnecessary for women to retire completely from society until their children are grown, and national programs to provide retraining for women who have chosen to care for their children full-time.

WE BELIEVE that it is as essential for every girl to be educated to her full potential of human ability as it is for every boy -- with the knowledge that such education is the key to effective participation in today's economy and that, for a girl as for a boy, education can only be serious where there is expectation that it will be used in society. We believe that American educators are capable of devising means of imparting such expectations to girl students. Moreover, we consider the decline in the proportion of women receiving higher and professional education to be evidence of discrimination. This discrimination may take the form of quotas against the admission of women to colleges, and professional schools; lack of encouragement by parents, counselors and educators; denial of loans or fellowships; or the traditional or arbitrary procedures in graduate and professional training geared in terms of men, which inadvertently discriminate against women. We believe that the same serious attention must be given to high school dropouts who are girls as to boys.

WE REJECT the current assumptions that a man must carry the sole burden of supporting himself, his wife, and family, and that a woman is automatically entitled to lifelong support by a man upon her marriage, or that marriage, home and family are primarily woman's world and responsibility -- hers, to dominate -- his to support. We believe that a true partnership between the sexes demands a different concept of marriage, an equitable sharing of the responsibilities of home and children and of the economic burdens of their support. We believe that proper recognition should be given to the economic and social value of homemaking and child-care. To these ends, we will seek to open a reexamination of laws and mores governing marriage and divorce, for we believe that the current state of `half-equity" between the sexes discriminates against both men and women, and is the cause of much unnecessary hostility between the sexes.

WE BELIEVE that women must now exercise their political rights and responsibilities as American citizens. They must refuse to be segregated on the basis of sex into separate-and-not-equal ladies' auxiliaries in the political parties, and they must demand representation according to their numbers in the regularly constituted party committees -- at local, state, and national levels -- and in the informal power structure, participating fully in the selection of candidates and political decision-making, and running for office themselves.

IN THE INTERESTS OF THE HUMAN DIGNITY OF WOMEN, we will protest, and endeavor to change, the false image of women now prevalent in the mass media, and in the texts, ceremonies, laws, and practices of our major social institutions. Such images perpetuate contempt for women by society and by women for themselves. We are similarly opposed to all policies and practices -- in church, state, college, factory, or office -- which, in the guise of protectiveness, not only deny opportunities but also foster in women self-denigration, dependence, and evasion of responsibility, undermine their confidence in their own abilities and foster contempt for women.

NOW WILL HOLD ITSELF INDEPENDENT OF ANY POLITICAL PARTY in order to mobilize the political power of all women and men intent on our goals. We will strive to ensure that no party, candidate, president, senator, governor, congressman, or any public official who betrays or ignores the principle of full equality between the sexes is elected or appointed to office. If it is necessary to mobilize the votes of men and women who believe in our cause, in order to win for women the final right to be fully free and equal human beings, we so commit ourselves.

WE BELIEVE THAT women will do most to create a new image of women by acting now, and by speaking out in behalf of their own equality, freedom, and human dignity - - not in pleas for special privilege, nor in enmity toward men, who are also victims of the current, half-equality between the sexes - - but in an active, self-respecting partnership with men. By so doing, women will develop confidence in their own ability to determine actively, in partnership with men, the conditions of their life, their choices, their future and their society.


cupofjo - 1/25/2007 at 02:25 AM

I have never read that! Thanks Ayla

Ed this is also turning out to be quite the history lesson too!


Ayla - 1/25/2007 at 02:39 AM


What a good way to refresh memories

Anything to keep the brain shaped-up

It takes so many "hits"


lolasdeb - 1/25/2007 at 02:48 AM

quote:
It takes so many "hits"
ROTFLMAO!!!


cupofjo - 1/25/2007 at 02:58 AM

I have taken so many hits my brain is permanently warped


dutchoneill - 1/25/2007 at 10:41 AM

Jan 25,2007...Soul on Ice

an important collection of essays on racial injustice in America, published in 1968 by Eldridge Cleaver. Partially writen while Cleaver, a Black American readical, was in jail. The book was published after his release from prison and while a member of the Black Panther Party.


More American History for your a$$es


cupofjo - 1/25/2007 at 02:18 PM



Ayla - 1/25/2007 at 02:35 PM


Okay, for today's lesson, this y'all just have to read and figure for yourself.
I'm not sure what to think of this guy. I have to keep putting my mind into the 60's for this .... and this early .... that's just to much brain power for me.
( Not a morning person )

One quote from this that gets me though

In Soul on Ice, the women are either madonnas or whores. ... wtf ?


cupofjo - 1/26/2007 at 01:29 AM

Ok Ayla I did some research on this guy and I think he was an ass. Sorry that is how I feel.



In the book, Cleaver infamously acknowledges raping several white women, which he defended as "an insurrectionary act." He also admitted that he began his career as a rapist by "practicing on black girls in the ghetto." He maintains that his criminal actions have nothing to do with the views expressed in the book.


lolasdeb - 1/26/2007 at 02:38 AM

Mixed feelings on Eldridge Cleaver as a person due to his disrespect and abuse of women (especially white women, or OGRE's, although he didn't start out respecting black women much more). I do think he was an eloquent writer and I admire that talent within him. Read pieces of Soul on Ice and it's disturbing and brilliant at the same time. Especially when you consider where he was coming from (liked his reference to having a 'higher uneducation').

I was aware of Soul on Ice but did some research and found he also wrote Soul on Fire which dealt with his years in exile in Algiers after fleeing the US to escape prosecution for Panther related activities. Did not know that Timothy Leary joined him there and that EC subsequently placed TL under 'revolutionary arrest' (anyway I couldn't recall this fact - like much from back then...) This book also deals with the Panther's relations with North Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

One interesting tidbit - an invention of Eldridge's which I don't think took off with public:

In 1975, Cleaver modeled anatomically fitted men's pants he designed featuring a "Cleaver sleeve" which was a penis sheath that was basically a sock protruding from the front of a pair of pants???

[Edited on 1/26/2007 by lolasdeb]


dutchoneill - 1/26/2007 at 11:17 AM

Jan 26, 2007... tune in

get with it, pay attention to what is going on around you, join what's happening. From a phrase by Timothy Leary, " Tune In, Turn On and drop out"


cupofjo - 1/26/2007 at 01:08 PM

Well when I was turning on I had a hard time of tuning in


WharfRat - 1/26/2007 at 01:40 PM

quote:
Jan 25,2007...Soul on Ice


I always thought that was about Aretha Frankin on ice skates


Ayla - 1/26/2007 at 03:21 PM


quote:
Jan 25,2007...Soul on Ice
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



I always thought that was about Aretha Frankin on ice skates




Good One Wharfy ..... LMAO !!!


Ayla - 1/26/2007 at 03:32 PM

Jan 26, 2007... tune in



"Turn on, tune in, drop out" is a counterculture phrase coined by Timothy Leary in the 1960s. It is an excerpt from a prepared speech he delivered at the opening of a press conference in New York City in September 1966. This phrase urged people to initiate cultural changes through the use of psychedelics.

Leary later explained in his 1983 autobiography Flashbacks: "'Turn on' meant go within to activate your neural and genetic equipment. Become sensitive to the many and various levels of consciousness and the specific triggers that engage them. Drugs were one way to accomplish this end. 'Tune in' meant interact harmoniously with the world around you - externalize, materialize, express your new internal perspectives. Drop out suggested an elective, selective, graceful process of detachment from involuntary or unconscious commitments. 'Drop Out' meant self-reliance, a discovery of one's singularity, a commitment to mobility, choice, and change. Unhappily my explanations of this sequence of personal development were often misinterpreted to mean 'Get stoned and abandon all constructive activity.'"

quote:
Well when I was turning on I had a hard time of tuning in



Oh Yeah ...

Or sometimes was just way to much " tuned in " or at least I thought I was


PeterNelson - 1/27/2007 at 02:00 AM

Wharfy, I don't see Aretha as a figure skater , but she is from Detroit and still lives there, so what do I know about anybody's winter recreation.

. . . Oh, man:

“Rhythm and Blades” – Annual Ice Show
Figure Skating in Harlem students gave two crowd-pleasing performances of its 8th annual ice show “Rhythm & Blades” on April 1 and 2, skating to the sounds of the great women of R&B from Aretha Franklin to Alicia Keys. . . .

Girls Flip for Surya at Largest Ever SOUL ON ICE Skating Party {caps on page}
On February 7, 2004 the FSH {Figure Skating in Harlem} Parent Association hosted its most successful SOUL ON ICE winter skating party ever, sponsored by Carver Bank. Over 1,200 family members, friends and neighbors came to Lasker Rink in Central Park to enjoy skating, music, food, and a special exhibition by Surya Bonaly, a star of Champions on Ice and 9-time French National Champion and World Silver Medalist of African descent famous for her athletic back flips. . . .

STUDENTS PRESENT DAZZLING TRIBUTE TO HARLEM'S APOLLO THEATER
FSH students were joined by honored guests Grammy-award winning singer Roberta Flack and world-class professional skater Rory Flack-Burghart to celebrate Figure Skating in Harlem's 3rd season. This sold-out ice show called "Apollo on Ice" was held at Riverbank State Park in March. Students performed to recorded music by Apollo legends Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, and Stevie Wonder. . . .

http://www.figureskatinginharlem.org/inside/highlights.html
______

I must've been born too late, because I don't think I've ever used the term "tune in" except in reference to radio and TV. Possibly also in reference to telepathic vibes, but even then re wavelengths and tuning in like a radio--I guess this is getting close to the '60s sense, except for being so literal and technical about it.

"Turn on," yes.

[Edited on 2007.1.27 by PeterNelson]


dutchoneill - 1/27/2007 at 01:06 PM

Jan 27&28, 2007....Serape

a heavt blanket worn as a coat or cape, originating in South and Central America. It usually had an opening in the middle for one's head. Also called a poncho. A fashion adopted by many hippies.


cupofjo - 1/28/2007 at 03:51 AM

I use to have one of these and a floppy leather hat I use to where


dutchoneill - 1/28/2007 at 02:44 PM

quote:
I use to have one of these and a floppy leather hat I use to where


OK, now I have the image...I know your type


Ayla - 1/28/2007 at 06:56 PM




I still have mine from the 70's. Thankfully I threw it in my car when I went to the first Wanee. Those nights were cold ... brrrrrr !!!


cupofjo - 1/29/2007 at 12:54 PM

quote:
quote:
I use to have one of these and a floppy leather hat I use to where


OK, now I have the image...I know your type



dutchoneill - 1/29/2007 at 02:04 PM

Jan 29,2007...mellow

peaceful and reserved. Examples: "There's a mellow cat, and she's a mellow mouse. Suppose we introduce them here in theismellow house?


LexABB - 1/29/2007 at 05:42 PM

And later I will eat at the Mellow Mushroom


lolasdeb - 1/29/2007 at 06:18 PM

Mellow ...used in a sentence...
This job is currently messing with my mellow vibe, man.


Ayla - 1/29/2007 at 07:22 PM




I'm just mad about Saffron.
A-Saffron's mad about me.
I'm-a just mad about Saffron.
She's just mad about me.

They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow.

I'm just mad about Frontine.
A-Frontine's mad about me.
I'm-a just mad about-a Frontine.
A-She's just mad about me.

They call me Mellow Yellow.
They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow.

Born-a high forever to fly.
Wind-a velocity nil.
Born-a high forever to fly.
If you want your cup, I will fill.

They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow.

So mellow yellow..

Electrical banana
Is gonna be a sudden craze.
Electrical banana
Is bound to be the very next phase.

They call it Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow.

Saffron, yeah.
I'm just-a mad about her.
I'm-a just-a mad about-a Saffron.
She's just mad about me.

They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow,
Quite rightly.
They call me Mellow Yellow.

Oh, so yellow..
Oh, so mellow..

It is rumored that the song "Mellow Yellow" is about smoking dried banana skins, which was believed to be a hallucinogenic drug in the 1960s, but this rumor has since been debunked. According to Donovan's notes accompanying the album "Donovan's Greatest Hits" the rumor that one could get high from smoking dried banana skins was started by Country Joe McDonald in 1966, and happened to occur three weeks before "Mellow Yellow" was released as a single. Thus, the misconception of the song's meaning soon followed its release.

The song's title actually refers to the fact that Donovan had suffered from liver disease in the winter of 1966 and had become severely jaundiced


cupofjo - 1/29/2007 at 10:34 PM




MELLLLLOOOWWW!


Then Chong scares the sh!t out of Cheech!




PeterNelson - 1/30/2007 at 03:37 AM

quote:
I'm just mad about Saffron.
A-Saffron's mad about me.
I'm-a just mad about Saffron.
She's just mad about me.
The first time I ever admitted to myself that I liked a girl, I was in grade school and this song was running through my head. I substituted the young lady's name for "Saffron" and sang it out loud, but quietly, to myself. I got a real thrill doing that! Even at that moment, I could tell I was crossing a threshold that could never be crossed back.

It wasn't for another 7 years or so that I actually heard the word mellow being used by anybody. Up to then it was just some distant hippie affectation. A couple friends and I were with Al's big brother, a college boy, who talked about a certain album being "mellow." Al picked up on that, and he was all eager to demonstrate his command of the lingo, asking his brother, "So it's a mellow one, right? That's a mellow band." Al was all "mellow" this and "mellow" that for the next hour.

I think I never quite got over the feeling that the word was an affectation, feeling unnatural, so I'd usually use laid back when I meant mellow like that. Otherwise, mellow of course could still apply, with very narrow meaning, to music and flavors. I don't think I ever said I was feeling mellow or somebody was "harshing my mellow" , except mockingly.

The case against mellow was significantly strengthened with the emergence of the mellotron and permanently sealed with Olivia Newton-John's "Have You Never Been Mellow?"


becksbolero - 1/30/2007 at 04:41 AM

quote:
The case against mellow was significantly strengthened with the emergence of the mellotron and permanently sealed with Olivia Newton-John's "Have You Never Been Mellow?"





dutchoneill - 1/30/2007 at 11:57 AM

Jan 30,2007.. de facto Segregation

ethat happens by circumstance rather than by legal requirement. Something in fact (de facto) not by law (de jure). Example: When Blacks are concentrated in a neighborhood, the schools will be presominantely Black or segregated. The busing of school children to different districts during the 70's was menat to corect this situation.


PeterNelson - 1/30/2007 at 03:05 PM

For a brief time in college, some of us guys on my dorm floor used to say "de facto" instead of "in fact." We'd give it an emphasis, especially the "fac" syllable, to make it sound more mock-important and -professorly. "No, I haven't gone to lunch yet. De FAC-to, I'm going right now."

There was a little working in of "ipso facto" and "ex post facto," but they didn't catch on as synonyms for "de facto." The few times they were used, they were used more correctly than "de facto." So, the tone of voice was still there, but because the usage was not flagrantly wrong, the mockery and quirkiness lost its absurd punch. De facto, using the correct "ipso facto" could only be a hollow reminder of how multidimensional the incorrect "de facto" was.


dutchoneill - 1/31/2007 at 11:18 AM

Jan 31,2007.."What a long strange Trip it's been"

notable lyrics from the Grateful Dead song "Truckin". It is difficult to put into words what the hippie era has meant to this world. The year 1984 would have dawned as Orwell predicted had it not been for the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s. We would all be living in a much more oppressive and controlled environment, rich and poor alike. The phrase, "what a long strange trip its been" has moved into our vocabulary and now examplifies the period, the movement, and the changes that transpired during the hippie era.


lolasdeb - 1/31/2007 at 09:12 PM

quote:
What a long strange Trip it's been"
That's for sure...still is!


cupofjo - 1/31/2007 at 11:29 PM

Truckin got my chips cashed in. keep truckin, like the do-dah man
Together, more or less in line, just keep truckin on.

Arrows of neon and flashing marquees out on main street.
Chicago, new york, detroit and its all on the same street.
Your typical city involved in a typical daydream
Hang it up and see what tomorrow brings.

Dallas, got a soft machine; houston, too close to new orleans;
New yorks got the ways and means; but just wont let you be, oh no.

Most of the cast that you meet on the streets speak of true love,
Most of the time theyre sittin and cryin at home.
One of these days they know they better get goin
Out of the door and down on the streets all alone.

Truckin, like the do-dah man. once told me youve got to play your hand
Sometimes your cards aint worth a dime, if you dont layem down,

Sometimes the lights all shinin on me;
Other times I can barely see.
Lately it occurs to me what a long, strange trip its been.

What in the world ever became of sweet jane?
She lost her sparkle, you know she isnt the same
Livin on reds, vitamin c, and cocaine,
All a friend can say is aint it a shame?

Truckin, up to buffalo. been thinkin, you got to mellow slow
Takes time, you pick a place to go, and just keep truckin on.

Sittin and starin out of the hotel window.
Got a tip theyre gonna kick the door in again
Id like to get some sleep before I travel,
But if you got a warrant, I guess youre gonna come in.

Busted, down on bourbon street, set up, like a bowlin pin.
Knocked down, it gets to wearin thin. they just wont let you be, oh no.

Youre sick of hangin around and youd like to travel;
Get tired of travelin and you want to settle down.
I guess they cant revoke your soul for tryin,
Get out of the door and light out and look all around.

Sometimes the lights all shinin on me;
Other times I can barely see.
Lately it occurs to me what a long, strange trip its been.

Truckin, Im a goin home. whoa whoa baby, back where I belong,
Back home, sit down and patch my bones, and get back truckin on.
Hey now get back truckin home.


dutchoneill - 2/1/2007 at 12:11 PM

Feb 1, 2007..Hair: The American Tribal Love Rock Musical

the definitive play and movie about the Hippie cultue. It opened in NYC at the Biltmore Theater in 1967 and eventually played extensive runs in most major cities in the USA and theroughout the world. Hair is the most successful venue in communicating hippie ideals, but, like so much of the counterculture's commentary, it was too satirical, ironic, and sacriligious for most consevative senseibilities.

She asks me why
I'm just a hairy guy
I'm hairy noon and night
Hair that's a fright
I'm hairy high and low
Don't ask me why
Don't know
It's not for lack of break
Like the Grateful Dead
Darling

Gimme head with hair
Long beautiful hair
Shining, gleaming,
Streaming, flaxen, waxen

Give me down to there hair
Shoulder length or longer
Here baby, there mama
Everywhere daddy daddy

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair

Let it fly in the breeze
And get caught in the trees
Give a home to the fleas in my hair
A home for fleas
A hive for bees
A nest for birds
There ain't no words
For the beauty, the splendor, the wonder
Of my...

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair

I want it long, straight, curly, fuzzy
Snaggy, shaggy, ratty, matty
Oily, greasy, fleecy
Shining, gleaming, streaming
Flaxen, waxen
Knotted, polka-dotted
Twisted, beaded, braided
Powdered, flowered, and confettied
Bangled, tangled, spangled, and spaghettied!

Oh say can you see
My eyes if you can
Then my hair's too short

Down to here
Down to there
Down to where
It stops by itself

They'll be ga ga at the go go
When they see me in my toga
My toga made of blond
Brilliantined
Biblical hair

My hair like Jesus wore it
Hallelujah I adore it
Hallelujah Mary loved her son
Why don't my mother love me?

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Flow it, show it
Long as God can grow it
My hair


cupofjo - 2/1/2007 at 12:25 PM

The Cowsills! They are from Newport RI


Here's some more to that visual Ed When I had my Serape and floppy leather hat my hair was down to my a$$


dutchoneill - 2/1/2007 at 12:34 PM

quote:
The Cowsills! They are from Newport RI


Here's some more to that visual Ed When I had my Serape and floppy leather hat my hair was down to my a$$


Are you sure we never hung out together Rob?


lolasdeb - 2/1/2007 at 05:27 PM

Had almost forgotten that the Cowsills did a cover of the Hair theme song. Remember the movie - 1st I can recall seeing the actors John Savage, Treat Williams, and Beverly D'Angelo. This movie always makes me think of Age of Aquarius...

When the moon is in the Seventh House
And Jupiter aligns with Mars
Then peace will guide the planets
And love will steer the stars

This is the dawning of the age of Aquarius
The age of Aquarius
Aquarius!
Aquarius!

Harmony and understanding
Sympathy and trust abounding
No more falsehoods or derisions
Golden living dreams of visions
Mystic crystal revalation
And the mind's true liberation
Aquarius!
Aquarius!

When the moon is in the Seventh House
And Jupiter aligns with Mars
Then peace will guide the planets
And love will steer the stars

This is the dawning of the age of Aquarius
The age of Aquarius
Aquarius!
Aquarius!


dutchoneill - 2/2/2007 at 12:00 PM

Feb 2,2007.. Far Out

a statement of approval. It can mean OK, good, wondeful,amazing or out of the ordinary. Same usage as out of sight. Althought sometimes the brunt of humorous hippie characterizations, it is now very much accepted as a common English idiom. The use and misuse of this phrase is an important indication of how cool a person is. A phrase with many uses, it is one of the 125 most prominent words or phrases that evolved out of the hippie era into continued use today.


cupofjo - 2/2/2007 at 12:25 PM

quote:
quote:
The Cowsills! They are from Newport RI


Here's some more to that visual Ed When I had my Serape and floppy leather hat my hair was down to my a$$


Are you sure we never hung out together Rob?





Maybe on one of those long strange trips I went on


cupofjo - 2/2/2007 at 12:27 PM

FAR OUT DUDE!


PeterNelson - 2/2/2007 at 03:04 PM

We used to make fun of the term far out by saying "far-rm out!"

Remember when John Denver was substituting for Johnny Carson as host of The Tonight Show one time, and during the interviews, he'd say, "Far out!" to everything the guests were saying?! It got kinda ludicrous quickly--seriously, it seemed like he said, "Far out!" at least 20 times, but maybe it was more like 10, but the audience was laughing more and more each time he did it, and he didn't know why. It was a little bit of a joke on the show, and about John Denver in general, after that.


Ayla - 2/2/2007 at 04:17 PM



Chong was given his first guitar at age 11, and started playing country and western music. He switched to rhythm and blues a few years later, but didn't take his first toke until the age of 17, when a Chinese bass player handed him a joint.

"No one knew what pot was," said Chong in an interview with the Edmonton Sun in May 2003. "I kept that one joint. It lasted me a long time. I'd take a few tokes and put it out. It really changed my life. I quit school right away and decided I wanted to be a blues musician."

When I think about anyone saying "Far Out", Tommy Chong immediately pops into my mind.Cheech and Chong movies crack me uip ... "Nice Dreams '

I'll still say "Far Out" every now and then.

quote:
We used to make fun of the term far out by saying "far-rm out!"


And Yes also said the "Farm Out" version, seems like we were saying "Farm Out"
around 72 or 73, that sound about right?


lolasdeb - 2/2/2007 at 05:35 PM

quote:
When I think about anyone saying "Far Out", Tommy Chong immediately pops into my mind.
LOL - same here, Ayla (Far out, man)!

[Edited on 2/2/2007 by lolasdeb]


dutchoneill - 2/2/2007 at 07:06 PM

quote:
We used to make fun of the term far out by saying "far-rm out!"

Remember when John Denver was substituting for Johnny Carson as host of The Tonight Show one time, and during the interviews, he'd say, "Far out!" to everything the guests were saying?! It got kinda ludicrous quickly--seriously, it seemed like he said, "Far out!" at least 20 times, but maybe it was more like 10, but the audience was laughing more and more each time he did it, and he didn't know why. It was a little bit of a joke on the show, and about John Denver in general, after that.


I kinda remember that Peter, one of the mnay things that bugged me about John Denver.


dutchoneill - 2/3/2007 at 03:03 PM

Feb 3-4, 2007.."You're either part of the problem or part of the solution"


an indictment by (Leroy) Eldridge Cleaver in a speech in San Fransico in 1968. It means that it's wrong to be complacent about social issues and uninvolved in solving social problems.


That is still part of my vocabulary to this day. I don't use it much but it certanily made an impression on me.
Of course sometimes I use it jokng around


Ayla - 2/3/2007 at 06:46 PM


.."You're either part of the problem or part of the solution"


I personally have been know to have been both ...


cupofjo - 2/4/2007 at 03:05 AM

I have been on both sides myself!

What was that movie Samuel L. Jackson says this line in?


dutchoneill - 2/5/2007 at 04:10 PM

Feb 5,2007 Burroughs, William S (Feb 5,1914- Aug 2,1997)

beat poet and outspoken homosexual. One of the major forces in the beatnik movement with Allen Ginsburg, Jack Kerouac. By expressing their distaste and distrust of American hyprocrisy and materialism, they made the hippie era possible. Burroughs is credited by many with introducing psychedelics into our culture, and also with coining the term heavy metal, which he used in The Naked Lunch.


PeterNelson - 2/5/2007 at 04:47 PM

quote:
And Yes also said the "Farm Out" version, seems like we were saying "Farm Out"
around 72 or 73, that sound about right?
Hi, Ayla! The band Yes?

I don't have a way to peg that term precisely to a year, but it must have been sometime in the first half of the '70s.
quote:
I kinda remember that Peter, one of the many things that bugged me about John Denver.
John Denver was an odd case, wasn't he, Dutch? His songs were too folky--played with acoustic guitar--and goody-goody, so he wasn't cool like the rockers. "Rocky Mountain High" in particular came in for much scorn from us kids who weren't high on just life.

Then he comes on The Tonight Show with his incessant grinning and "Far out"s, and he seemed like the Establishment's wishful idea of a hippie--sorta clean cut and positive thinking and, most of all, singing gentle music. Not our kind of hippie! John seemed like a phony sellout, with granny glasses and sorta long hair, but really too "straight," as we used to say! And "Far out" was already so worn out.

John was as unrealistic a media representation of the counterculture as those hippie pads on Dragnet.


Ayla - 2/5/2007 at 05:45 PM

quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
And Yes also said the "Farm Out" version, seems like we were saying "Farm Out"
around 72 or 73, that sound about right?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----

Hi, Ayla! The band Yes?

I don't have a way to peg that term precisely to a year, but it must have been sometime in the first half of the '70s


What I wanted to say was "Yes, I also said "Farm-out"
Posted way to early for my brain
....it ( my brain) usualy doesn't kick in till around 4pm ...

Really like the band "Yes" though, still listen to their "albums" every now and then


lolasdeb - 2/5/2007 at 07:33 PM

William S Burroughs ... what a character! Being a fan of Beat literature I have read Junky and parts of Naked Lunch. To me, Burroughs always looked old - even in pictures taken from earlier in his life (don't know if this is because he was older than many of the other Beats he associated with or because of the drugs). He was a definite study in contrasts but to me led a sad life... raised in an upper-class family he became a junky drifter ... he was homosexual but entered a marriage partnership that produced children ... his marriage ended in tragedy when Burrough's attempted to shoot a glass off his wifes head while demonstrating his William Tell act for friends and shot and killed his wife ... his son battled a life-long addiction to alcohol that eventually killed him, something he partially blamed on abuse he suffered at hands of his father's 'friends' while visiting during William S's Tangiers exhile.

Musical interest note - Steely Dan took their name from William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch, which references a dildo by that name.

Here's a segment from Naked Lunch that I think provides a telling self-assessment by Burrough's (note - Lee is Burroughs alias in this book. Was also the alias he used when Junky was originally published).

quote:

Lee's face, his whole person, seemed at first glance completely anonymous. He looked like an FBI man, like anybody. But the absence of trappings, of anything remotely picturesque or baroque, distinguished and delineated Lee, so that seen twice you would not forget him. Sometimes his face looked blurred, then it would come suddenly into focus, etched sharp and naked by the flashbulb of urgency. An electric distinction poured out of him, impregnated his shabby clothes, his steel-rimmed glasses, his dirty gray felt hat. These objects could be recognized anywhere as belonging to Lee.

His face had the look of a superimposed photo, reflecting afractured spirit that could never love man or woman with complete wholeness. Yet he was driven by an intense need to make his love real, to change fact. Usually he selected someone who could not reciprocate, so that he was able-cautiously, like one who tests uncertain ice, though in this case the danger was not that the ice give way but that it might hold his weight-to shift the burden of not loving, of being unable to love, onto the partner.

The objects of his high-tension love felt compelled to declare neutrality, feeling themselves surrounded by a struggle of dark purposes, not in direct danger, only liable to be caught in the line of fire. Lee never came on with a kill-lover-and-self routine. Basically the loved one was always and forever an Outsider, a Bystander, an Audience.





[Edited on 2/5/2007 by lolasdeb]


cupofjo - 2/5/2007 at 09:36 PM

quote:


Musical interest note - Steely Dan took their name from William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch, which references a dildo by that name.





I did not know that!

This should have been a Thursday word


dutchoneill - 2/6/2007 at 12:07 PM

Feb 6,2007```self-realization

finding yourself and being happy with what you find. Self-satisfaction. It has many more spiritual and cosmic descriptions, but this is a basic hippie definition.


WharfRat - 2/6/2007 at 01:47 PM

Can someone help me kind some of that?


Ayla - 2/6/2007 at 03:32 PM


self-realization

Look inside yourself, and if you dont see what you want,
Maybe sometimes then you dont,
But leave your mind alone and just get high.

............ KInda sums it up


lolasdeb - 2/6/2007 at 10:23 PM

Self-realization - the fulfillment of your capacities

In yoga, self-realization is knowledge of one's true self. The term "self-realization" is a translation of the Sanskrit expression atman jnana (knowledge of the self or atman). The reason the term "realization" is used instead of "knowledge" is that jnana (one's true knowledge or pure awareness) refers to knowledge based on experience, not mere intellectual knowledge.

Self realization is a goal of all types of Yoga but is reached through different paths and/or may occur on different levels for the various yoga disciplines.

oohhhmmmm

[Edited on 2/6/2007 by lolasdeb]


dutchoneill - 2/7/2007 at 12:06 PM

Feb 7,2007 Age of Aquarius

an astrological era of 2,000 years that is expected to start some time around A.D. 2060, though proponents of astrology have argued on dates ranging from 1904 to 2160. ALyrics of a song in the rock opera Hair stated, "This is the dawning of the age of Aquarius" The age is saidto be a time of decline of institutions and religions and the rebirth of enlightenment, self awareness and the brotherhood of man. Thought to herald the start of the New Age, which spawned the development of many hybrid EasterWestern spiritual practices and religions by Hippies.


Ayla - 2/7/2007 at 01:34 PM


The Dawning of the Age of Aquarius (Almost)



Because of the precession of the equinoxes, the vernal equinox moves through all the constellations of the Zodiac over the 26,000 year precession period. Presently the vernal equinox is in the constellation Pisces and is slowly approaching Aquarius.
This is the origin of the "Age of Aquarius" celebrated in the musical Hair: a period when according to astrological mysticism and related hokum there will be unusual harmony and understanding in the world. We could certainly use a dose of harmony and understanding in this old world; unfortunately, it is unlikely to come because of something as irrelevant as the position of the vernal equinox with respect to the constellations of the Zodiac.


lolasdeb - 2/7/2007 at 04:26 PM

(from the play/movie Hair...)

When the moon is in the Seventh House
And Jupiter aligns with Mars
Then peace will guide the planets
And love will steer the stars

This is the dawning of the age of Aquarius
The age of Aquarius
Aquarius!
Aquarius!

Harmony and understanding
Sympathy and trust abounding
No more falsehoods or derisions
Golden living dreams of visions
Mystic crystal revalation
And the mind's true liberation
Aquarius!
Aquarius!

When the moon is in the Seventh House
And Jupiter aligns with Mars
Then peace will guide the planets
And love will steer the stars

This is the dawning of the age of Aquarius
The age of Aquarius
Aquarius!
Aquarius!


PeterNelson - 2/7/2007 at 07:22 PM

Astrology (and most of the New Age blather) was never one of my favorite things about the hippies.

quote:
unfortunately, it is unlikely to come because of something as irrelevant as the position of the vernal equinox with respect to the constellations of the Zodiac.
Anybody ever see Rainbow Bridge, which eventually featured the Jimi Hendrix Experience playing in a Hawaiian volcano crater or something? Man, there was some execrable hippy-dippy (or drugged-out) "dialogue" coming from the hippies, including Jimi, throughout that movie.


crosstownbar - 2/7/2007 at 09:52 PM

quote:
Astrology (and most of the New Age blather) was never one of my favorite things about the hippies.
quote:
unfortunately, it is unlikely to come because of something as irrelevant as the position of the vernal equinox with respect to the constellations of the Zodiac.
Anybody ever see Rainbow Bridge, which eventually featured the Jimi Hendrix Experience playing in a Hawaiian volcano crater or something? Man, there was some execrable hippy-dippy (or drugged-out) "dialogue" coming from the hippies, including Jimi, throughout that movie.


I remember it Peter ... got it on VHS somewheres around here. Jimi's
rap rambled on quite a bit. Here is a loose paraphrase that for some reason
has always been stuck in my mind:
"Imagine the Earth is a waterhole.... and all the peoples of the Earth
are the wildebeests that come to drink at the waterhole......"
Then he finally hit the stage playing a Flying V ... awesome intro he
does to "Hear My Train A'Coming"


dutchoneill - 2/8/2007 at 12:08 PM

Feb 8,2007 BOOB

a stupid, gullible or socially inappropriate person. Comes from a word coined by H.L. mencken, booboisie, his term for middle-class shortsightnedness in moral, religious and political issues.


Ayla - 2/8/2007 at 02:59 PM


Boob
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boob can refer to:

* A woman's breast
* A fool or idiot
* Booby, part of the family Sulidae, a group of seabirds closely related to gannets

The phrase boob tube has two meanings:

* In Australian, British, South African, and Canadian English, a boob tube is a type of woman's top
* In American and Canadian slang, a boob tube is a television set; normally negative or humorous, this usage comes from the words boob (a foolish person) and tube (from the television's cathode ray tube)



cupofjo - 2/9/2007 at 12:22 AM


lolasdeb - 2/9/2007 at 12:59 AM

LOL Cupofjo!


dutchoneill - 2/9/2007 at 10:56 AM

Feb 9,2007 Meat Hooks

hands. Used prior to the hippie era, but expanded during the 60's and 70's. Refers to either hands as hooks made of meat or hands as hooks that grab things like meat. I believe it is most likely the former.


cupofjo - 2/9/2007 at 01:25 PM

Hmm! When I think of meat hooks I think of some mob goon


Ayla - 2/9/2007 at 01:34 PM

Meat Hooks

From the seventies reminds me of



I remember seeing this at the drive-in and getting freaked out !!!

[Edited on 2/9/2007 by Ayla]


WharfRat - 2/9/2007 at 02:02 PM

LOL!! I still use "meat hooks" sometimes.


dutchoneill - 2/11/2007 at 12:07 PM

Feb 10/11, 2007.. Quant, Mary (1934-)

British fashion designer responsible for the mod look, the minismirt, hot pants and body stockings. She opened her clothing boutique, Bazaar, in London in 1955. In response to the rebelious tastes of youth culture, she began designing modern, new styles influenced by pop art and op art. Soon, her shop was the place to buy clothing for all the mods and rock and roll stars.


Ayla - 2/11/2007 at 04:14 PM


1971 - 1972

I was a freshman in highschool and got sent home for wearing hot pants & platform shoes.
I knew that I would get in trouble for wearing it, but I was always wanting to buck the system.
If first thing in the morning my name wasn't called over the PA to report to the principal's office, it would be amazing. To this day when I run into people from school, that's the first thing they say, "Your name was called everyday" I believe I hold the record


dutchoneill - 2/11/2007 at 05:27 PM

hot pants
pl.n.
Vulgar Slang. Strong sexual desire.
Very brief tight shorts worn by women as an outer garment.


cupofjo - 2/11/2007 at 10:23 PM

quote:

1971 - 1972

I was a freshman in highschool and got sent home for wearing hot pants & platform shoes.
I knew that I would get in trouble for wearing it, but I was always wanting to buck the system.
If first thing in the morning my name wasn't called over the PA to report to the principal's office, it would be amazing. To this day when I run into people from school, that's the first thing they say, "Your name was called everyday" I believe I hold the record


Do you have pictures


lolasdeb - 2/12/2007 at 04:09 AM

After moving back to Des Moines from Chicago I took a job as a cocktail waitress in a place called the Purple Jester and our 'costume' involved fishnets, hot pants, and some little vest thing. The lounge was tied to a hotel so there were plenty of transient business men passing through and it was pretty demeaning attempting to deal with some of these guy (see prior word of day 'meat hooks'). Alls I know is that someone ended up wearing a drink neatly divided between their face and lap and those hot pants got tossed after that (but I was allowed to keep my job) .


dutchoneill - 2/12/2007 at 12:05 PM

Feb 12,2007...Zowie

an exclamation indicating the presence of energy or excitement. From wowie-zowie
Sometimes seen as a zow in comic books.
"Zowie, that was a special be-in"


Ayla - 2/12/2007 at 02:01 PM

Batman hits someone, "ZOWIE"





crash bang sock biff bam zap crunch boff zowie bang

"Into the Bat mobile Robin"

[Edited on 2/12/2007 by Ayla]


cupofjo - 2/12/2007 at 02:35 PM

quote:

"Into the Bat mobile Robin"





WharfRat - 2/12/2007 at 02:38 PM

quote:
Batman hits someone, "ZOWIE"







Is it Thursday already?


PeterNelson - 2/12/2007 at 05:50 PM

Time to catch up with my hippie vocab!

quote:
quote:
Batman hits someone, "ZOWIE"


Is it Thursday already?
Batman and Robin in hot pants: boobs.

Ayla and Deb in hot pants--wowie zowie!


cupofjo - 2/12/2007 at 07:34 PM

LMAO!


dutchoneill - 2/12/2007 at 08:07 PM

OK, we're rolling now

Thanks everyone for keeping this one going.
it will be our little secret


Ayla - 2/12/2007 at 09:53 PM


quote:
Ayla and Deb in hot pants--wowie zowie!


Hey Now ... Your not suggesting this for Beacon attire are ya?

"LOL"



quote:
OK, we're rolling now

Thanks everyone for keeping this one going.
it will be our little secret



"I'm just looking for some good clean fun."

Always curious what the next word wll be


dutchoneill - 2/13/2007 at 12:17 PM

Feb 13,2007....be-in

a gathering of people for creative expression. Originating in San Fransico's Golden Gate Park, these happenings often involved drugs, theatrical performances, and musics and sometimes took on the appearance of large "dada" art objects. A notable example was the human be-in gathering of the tribes held in the Polo Fields in San Fransisco's Golden Gate Park on January 14,1967.


Ayla - 2/13/2007 at 03:06 PM

The Human Be-In was announced on the cover of the first issue of the San Francisco Oracle as "A Gathering of the Tribes for a Human Be-In."



The 'Human Be-In' was a happening in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, the afternoon and evening of January 14, 1967. It was a prelude to San Francisco's Summer of Love, which made the Haight-Ashbury district a household word as the center of an American counterculture and introduced the word 'psychedelic' to suburbia.


WharfRat - 2/13/2007 at 04:00 PM

Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?


dutchoneill - 2/13/2007 at 04:30 PM

quote:
Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?




Yes it does and if they turn down the music I will Be-In the seat next to you


Ayla - 2/13/2007 at 04:35 PM

quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



Yes it does and if they turn down the music I will Be-In the seat next to you



I'll Be-In the seat on the other side of ya !

[Edited on 2/13/2007 by Ayla]


WharfRat - 2/13/2007 at 04:42 PM

quote:
quote:
Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?




Yes it does and if they turn down the music I will Be-In the seat next to you


Turn DOWN?

The ladies need thier bar dancing motivation


WharfRat - 2/13/2007 at 04:42 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



Yes it does and if they turn down the music I will Be-In the seat next to you



I'll Be-In the seat on the other side of ya !

[Edited on 2/13/2007 by Ayla]



dutchoneill - 2/13/2007 at 05:48 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Ummmm I will Be-In Yogi's in a few short weeks.. does that count?




Yes it does and if they turn down the music I will Be-In the seat next to you


Turn DOWN?

The ladies need thier bar dancing motivation


Well, then I'll wear my concert ear plugs


WharfRat - 2/14/2007 at 03:08 PM

Whats the word of the day Ed

KillCupid?

eFFValantines?

HeManWomanHaterz?


Ayla - 2/14/2007 at 04:07 PM




quote:
Whats the word of the day Ed

KillCupid?

eFFValantines?

HeManWomanHaterz?




[Edited on 2/14/2007 by Ayla]


dutchoneill - 2/14/2007 at 08:37 PM

Feb 14,2007 Tim Buckley (b. Feb 14,1947, Washington, D.C.; d. June 29,1975, Santa Monica, Calif)
White folk and early rock singer songwriter. One of the late folk musicians who influenced many rock musicians into becoming more social and political in their music.


dutchoneill - 2/14/2007 at 08:37 PM

Feb 14,2007 Tim Buckley (b. Feb 14,1947, Washington, D.C.; d. June 29,1975, Santa Monica, Calif)
White folk and early rock singer songwriter. One of the late folk musicians who influenced many rock musicians into becoming more social and political in their music.


dutchoneill - 2/15/2007 at 11:59 AM

Feb 15,2007 Up Front

truthful, straightforward, candid. A term that apeared in our lexicon around 1971. Example:"I'll be up front about this; your aversion to soap and water leaves no chance for our happily ever after."

I Love their examples


lolasdeb - 2/15/2007 at 05:02 PM

Was lucky to see Tim Buckley live in a local club (believe the year was 73) and he ripped it up. RIP Tim.


Ayla - 2/15/2007 at 05:03 PM

Up Front

quote:
Example:"I'll be up front about this; your aversion to soap and water leaves no chance for our happily ever after."

I Love their examples




Still use" Up Front" , especially when I'm talking to my 17 year old.

You'd better be up front with me about this, or it's your a$$ on the line !!!

My other "Up Front"

Greggswoman and I were up front dancing our a$$es off at the Honeytribe show in Denver



lolasdeb - 2/15/2007 at 05:22 PM

quote:
Up Front
truthful, straightforward, candid. A term that apeared in our lexicon around 1971. Example:"I'll be up front about this; your aversion to soap and water leaves no chance for our happily ever after."
I Love their examples
LMAO - no doubt, dutch! (like Ayla's examples, also!)


PeterNelson - 2/15/2007 at 05:26 PM

Not exactly related, but probably an ad thing trying to exploit the buzz of the real term: "It's what's up front that counts." Was that a cigarette slogan?

quote:
truthful, straightforward, candid.
Interestingly, the more contemporary fronting means basically the opposite of being up front. I guess it stems from putting up a facade.


dutchoneill - 2/16/2007 at 07:05 PM

Feb 16,2007 The Yardbirds

a guitar oriented blues rock band formed in London in 1963, most notable for the musicians who moved through the group and on to do other things. The band was originally called The Most Blueswalling Yardbirds; they recorded with blues legand Sonny Boy Williams and had several hit songs in 1965 and 1966. Their rotating lead guitarists were Anthony "Top" Topham, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy page.

[Edited on 2/16/2007 by dutchoneill]


lolasdeb - 2/16/2007 at 07:34 PM

quote:
The term, "Yardbird" is used in the southern United States as slang for 'chicken' (as in poultry), and it is a slang expression for "prisoner," i.e. one hanging out in the prison yard.
Being a northern gal for most of my life I did not know the yardbird/chicken connection. Believe the 1st song I remember with the Yardbirds was 'For Your Love' and can remember seeing them on Hullabaloo or Shindig.


dutchoneill - 2/16/2007 at 10:38 PM

quote:
quote:
The term, "Yardbird" is used in the southern United States as slang for 'chicken' (as in poultry), and it is a slang expression for "prisoner," i.e. one hanging out in the prison yard.
Being a northern gal for most of my life I did not know the yardbird/chicken connection. Believe the 1st song I remember with the Yardbirds was 'For Your Love' and can remember seeing them on Hullabaloo or Shindig.




Sounds about right to me, I wonder if those old shows are on DVD?


lolasdeb - 2/16/2007 at 11:21 PM

quote:
Sounds about right to me, I wonder if those old shows are on DVD?
I don't know but it would be GREAT if they were! I can remember seeing a lot of excellent music on those shows!


dutchoneill - 2/16/2007 at 11:53 PM

quote:
quote:
Sounds about right to me, I wonder if those old shows are on DVD?
I don't know but it would be GREAT if they were! I can remember seeing a lot of excellent music on those shows!


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw/104-0041259-9880716?url=search-alias%3 Ddvd&field-keywords=shindig


lolasdeb - 2/17/2007 at 12:17 AM

Thanks, Dutch!


PeterNelson - 2/17/2007 at 01:52 AM

quote:
The band was originally called The Most Blueswalling Yardbirds;
They were just called "most blueswailing" by an emcee (or their manager?) introducing them before a live recording, but it wasn't part of their name, was it, Dutch?
quote:
they recorded with blues legand Sonny Boy Williams
Williamson
quote:
and had several hit songs in 1965 and 1966. Their rotating lead guitarists were Anthony "Top" Topham, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy page.
Something about the word "rotating" makes me want to protest.
Top Topham was with the band only like a couple weeks or something.



The band got established with Eric on guitar for quite a while.
Then Jeff was hired when Eric left.



Keith Relf, vocals, harp; Jim McCarty, drums; Jeff; Chris Dreja, rhythm guitar, then bass; Pagey

Page was hired to play bass at first but soon switched over to dual lead guitar with Jeff.
Then Jeff quit, leaving Pagey as the only guitarist until the Yardbirds fell apart.
Pagey tried to carry on--with all different bandmates--as the New Yardbirds, but then he changed the name to Led Zeppelin.
The "original" Yardbirds have been back together for a few years now, led by McCarty and Dreja.
http://www.yardbirds.us/home.html


dutchoneill - 2/17/2007 at 03:22 AM

quote:
quote:
The band was originally called The Most Blueswalling Yardbirds;
They were just called "most blueswailing" by an emcee (or their manager?) introducing them before a live recording, but it wasn't part of their name, was it, Dutch?
quote:
they recorded with blues legand Sonny Boy Williams
Williamson
quote:
and had several hit songs in 1965 and 1966. Their rotating lead guitarists were Anthony "Top" Topham, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy page.
Something about the word "rotating" makes me want to protest.
Top Topham was with the band only like a couple weeks or something.



The band got established with Eric on guitar for quite a while.
Then Jeff was hired when Eric left.



Keith Relf, vocals, harp; Jim McCarty, drums; Jeff; Chris Dreja, rhythm guitar, then bass; Pagey

Page was hired to play bass at first but soon switched over to dual lead guitar with Jeff.
Then Jeff quit, leaving Pagey as the only guitarist until the Yardbirds fell apart.
Pagey tried to carry on--with all different bandmates--as the New Yardbirds, but then he changed the name to Led Zeppelin.
The "original" Yardbirds have been back together for a few years now, led by McCarty and Dreja.
http://www.yardbirds.us/home.html


Ya know Peter, when I was typing out the daily today, when I go to Sonny Boy, I typed Willamson, then saw that the calendar said Williams, so I fixed it...my bad.


becksbolero - 2/17/2007 at 06:42 AM

quote:
The band was originally called The Most Blueswalling Yardbirds

They were just called "most blueswailing" by an emcee (or their manager?) introducing them before a live recording, but it wasn't part of their name, was it, Dutch?



actually the band started off as the metropolis blues quartet.

quote:
Top Topham was with the band only like a couple weeks or something.


anthony "top" topham left the band under pressure from his parents to complete his studies - he was still in his mid teens at the time. you can read more about his career on his webste - http://www.toptopham.com

quote:
Then Jeff was hired when Eric left.


page was the bands first choice when clapton announced he was leaving after the recording of "for your love". page however did not want to give up his lucrative session work. page recommended beck for the job. it was only after the band started having hits and when bassist paul samwell-smith left that page accepted the bands offer to join.


dutchoneill - 2/17/2007 at 04:32 PM

Feb 17-18,2007 Hip Huggers

pants with no waistband, intended to be worn below the top of the pelvic bone, thus hugging the hip. Originally, a counterculture creation when girls wore guys' jeans that had no waist and therefore slipped down around their hips. A style that evolved into fashion in the early 1970's. Often designed as unisex clothing, meaning they could be worn by men or women.




[Edited on 2/17/2007 by dutchoneill]


becksbolero - 2/17/2007 at 06:42 PM


PeterNelson - 2/17/2007 at 08:59 PM

becksbolero, you beat me to it. I was going to mention the Booker T & the MGs' song, too, but that album cover is great!

Also, nice further detail on the Yardbirds. Thanks for the Top Topham link. I'll have to check it out later, because I've always wondered about him. His role was so minor and paved the way for such major players that I've always considered him more of whatever than Pete Best or that Stu guy.

The Yardbirds weren't called the Metropolis Blues Quartet still when Eric joined, were they? Among other things, he (or Top before him) made them a quintet.

Dutch, that's okay, as long as we remember that we can't believe ev'rything we read, now can we? Even on calendars (besides the dates).


becksbolero - 2/17/2007 at 10:15 PM

quote:
becksbolero, you beat me to it. I was going to mention the Booker T & the MGs' song, too, but that album cover is great!

Also, nice further detail on the Yardbirds. Thanks for the Top Topham link. I'll have to check it out later, because I've always wondered about him. His role was so minor and paved the way for such major players that I've always considered him more of whatever than Pete Best or that Stu guy.

The Yardbirds weren't called the Metropolis Blues Quartet still when Eric joined, were they? Among other things, he (or Top before him) made them a quintet.

Dutch, that's okay, as long as we remember that we can't believe ev'rything we read, now can we? Even on calendars (besides the dates).


from my rememberance the yardbirds were the metropolis blues quartet until drummer jim mccarty joined. they then changed their name to the yardbirds. 16 year old topham was asked to leave the band due to pressure from his parents to devote all his time to his studies. 18 year old eric clapton (who was an art school friend of keith relf's) was then asked to join.

top topham later played with english blues legend duster bennett. topham also played on the first solo lp by chicken shack keyboardist and future fleetwood mac member christine mcvie which was released under her maiden name christine perfect.



[Edited on 2/18/2007 by becksbolero]


Ayla - 2/18/2007 at 02:50 AM

Feb 17-18,2007 Hip Huggers

Absolutely dig my hip hugger jeans. I said 'jeans' not the bright pink ones like in photo.
I'll be wearing my hip huggers at the Beacon (forget the hot pants) !
Never got into those high waisted pants. Hig hugger bell bottoms ... Oh Yeah !!!


dutchoneill - 2/19/2007 at 01:14 PM

Feb 19, 2007...straight or go straight

to conform to the majority rules and mores. This is not always the right path for everyone. As with homosexuality, if a gay person tries to be straight, it can be psychologically damaging. How far to step outside of scoiety is a decision each individual must make personally. One must think about the consequences of bending the rules and consider the social ramifications of offending others.


Ayla - 2/19/2007 at 02:27 PM


Feb 19, 2007...straight or go straight

You were either straight or buzzed.

When giving directions, it was "go forward"
nobody wanted to tell anyone to go "Straight"


PeterNelson - 2/20/2007 at 04:45 PM

Ayla, back in our high school, if you weren't one of the straights (there's a different way of looking at the noun, rather than being straight), you weren't necessarily buzzed, since most of us weren't stoned all the time.

Also, we didn't have a term for those of us who weren't straight (or in this new sense, who wasn't a straight). There was just the straight people, and then there was us. We weren't the stoners, the burnouts, the hippies, or anything like that. Some of us were freaks, but this term still had a bit of a negative connotation, so it wasn't universally used among the non-straight.

Finally, the straight/not divide transcended other high school groupings. For example, you thought of most of the jocks and most of the brains as being straight, but not all of them. Being not straight brought together people from the different groups more than being straight did. Of course, being not straight meant participating in a certain party activity, whereas there was no "unifying" activity for the straight category (just the lack of getting stoned).

Back in those days (that other paragraph wasn't "finally," was it?), there were no terms "nerd" or "geek," which are both far worse than "brain," which didn't have much of a connotation that the person was necessarily weird and out of it. There were a lot of brains who were not horribly nerdy , and there were a lot of non-brains who were.

"Geeks" today are probably all brains, but back then it was just the old meaning of weirdo, maybe with an extra twist, and not necessarily smart at computers or anything. Back then, using "freak" was sorta like using "geek" today: They both have these really odd connotations (is that the third time I've used this word?), but some people apply the terms to themselves proudly, and the terms gradually lose the worst aspects of weirdness, becoming more about being really into something.


dutchoneill - 2/20/2007 at 07:57 PM

Feb 20,2007 Mondo

prefix meaning a great deal of, or much. It intensified the size or number of any word to which it was added. Examples: "Mondo-money, mondo-love, mondo-macho" Simillar usage as beaucoup.


lolasdeb - 2/20/2007 at 08:09 PM

Mondo Cane?

In 1963, MONDO CANE became a huge international sensation even garnering an Academy Award for Best Song. A collaboration between Italian directors Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi, it was an unprecedented collection of footage depicting taboo behavior from around the world. Shock after shock, real and staged, filled the screen appealing to voyeurs of the Now Generation. Mexican cops dressing up like hookers -- cut to backwards footage of a pig's journey in a German slaughterhouse, and so on. For years from all over the world countless freak shows followed. By the late '60s, the Mondo Movie was a firmly established, money making genre.


dutchoneill - 2/20/2007 at 10:14 PM

quote:
Mondo Cane?

In 1963, MONDO CANE became a huge international sensation even garnering an Academy Award for Best Song. A collaboration between Italian directors Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi, it was an unprecedented collection of footage depicting taboo behavior from around the world. Shock after shock, real and staged, filled the screen appealing to voyeurs of the Now Generation. Mexican cops dressing up like hookers -- cut to backwards footage of a pig's journey in a German slaughterhouse, and so on. For years from all over the world countless freak shows followed. By the late '60s, the Mondo Movie was a firmly established, money making genre.


I do remember that one.


lolasdeb - 2/20/2007 at 10:29 PM

quote:
I do remember that one.
I'd almost forgotten about it until I saw the Mondo-word-of-the-day. LOL I remember how shocking and controversial this film was when it came out ... wonder how it would stand up to today's video (bet it's not as much of a visual surprise now...)

[Edited on 2/20/2007 by lolasdeb]


dutchoneill - 2/21/2007 at 11:55 AM

Feb 21,2007 Ken Kesey (1935-2001)

writer, scholar and counterculture personality. While attending Stanford University in 1959, he was a paid government guinea pig in early LSD experiments at the Menlo Park, California Veteran's Hospital. This would make him among the first of the psychedelic travelers, even predating Timothy Leary. Kesey was the author of "One flew over the Cuckoos Nest", 1962, "Sometimes a Great Notion" 1964 and many articles, book introductions and other sundry publications. In the mid 1960's, Kesey was arrested several times for his drug involvment and generalyy hasseled for being "diferent"


Ayla - 2/21/2007 at 03:56 PM

When I think of Ken Kesey the first thing that pops in my mind is:




The Merry Pranksters are a group of people who originally formed around American novelist Ken Kesey and sometimes lived communally at his homes in California and Oregon. Notable members include Kesey's best friend Ken Babbs and Mountain Girl (born Carolyn Adams but best known as Mrs. Jerry Garcia), Wavy Gravy, Stewart Brand, Paul Foster and others. Their early escapades were best chronicled by Tom Wolfe in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Ken Kesey once described Wolfe's book as, "99.9% accurate" although he also complained that the celebrity status the book conveyed upon him was in some ways a burden.

Ken Kesey and The Merry Pranksters are remembered chiefly for the sociological significance of a lengthy roadtrip they took in 1964, traveling across the United States in a psychedelically painted school bus enigmatically labeled "Furthur." The trip's original purpose was to celebrate the publication of Kesey's novel "Sometimes a Great Notion" and to visit the 1964 World's Fair in New York City. The Pranksters were enthusiastic users of marijuana and LSD, and in the process of their journey they are said to have "turned on" many people by introducing them to these drugs.

Following the bus trip, the Pranksters held a series of "Acid Tests", where participants were given "acid", the street name for LSD. The tests were held at various venues, and were sometimes advertised with crayoned signs asking "Can you pass the acid test?" The first Acid Test was held in Palo Alto, California in November 1965. (LSD was legal in the United States until October 6, 1966.) The young psychedelic music band The Grateful Dead (known earlier as The Warlocks) supplied the music during these events; in essence, they were the house band for the mobile party

There are no membership requirements to be a Merry Prankster. As Kesey put it when asked how you become a Merry Prankster, "I don't pick 'em, I recognize them." People who consider themselves Pranksters in spirit are said to be "on the bus" whether or not they ever actually took a bus trip with Kesey. In other words, the bus has become a metaphor for the lifestyle of anyone who is in solidarity with the psychedelic movement and who encourages others to have mind expanding experiences, with or without drugs. While everyone is invited to consider themselves a member of the Merry Pranksters, Kesey was strict about what should constitute a proper prank. He said a successful prank must not physically hurt anyone, and the person being pranked must in some way be enlightened by the experience.


PeterNelson - 2/21/2007 at 05:12 PM

There's this one guitar player in the area, Jeff Kerr, who I thought was the best Allman cover player in local nightclubs back in the '70s. He was in a dual-guitar band, and he played the slide and other Duane parts.

His latest band that I know of, from 1990-2000 (when the other guitarist moved to Chicago), was called the Mighty Pranksters. To tell the truth, I held this name against them because of its obvious link to the name Merry Pranksters and the whole acid thing that this suggests. I think it's bad enough that the Allman Brothers Band venerates shrooms. This is not just because I'm against drugs for myself or for my nieces and nephews, but because in the cases of these particular musicians (ABB and Kerr), drugs had such a negative impact, so I don't know why drugs are still being celebrated in any way.

Here's a blurb from a club site:
"They're BACK. Bill 'Griz' Stevens, Jeff Kerr, Brian Wilkie, Andre Mossotti, and Danny Deckard rendezvous for the first time in 2005 (yes, the reunion is now annual!), playing their amazing mix of Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers, Little Feat, Mighty Prankster originals, and more. One of Champaign-Urbana's most beloved bands, these guys have been doing their thang long before the words 'jam band' became a popular tag and/or genre."
www.angelfire.com/il2/mightypranksters/

In terms of music, as I was older in the '90s and understood music more, Kerr's guitar playing was less impressive than it had been 20 years before. The setlist, or influence list, may look good, but the Pranksters' renditions really made you wish for the originals.


lolasdeb - 2/21/2007 at 05:25 PM

quote:
When I think of Ken Kesey the first thing that pops in my mind is: Merry Pranksters
No doubt - these guys always make me smile! For anyone who hasn't read it, Tom Wolfe's Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test is great!


dutchoneill - 2/22/2007 at 12:08 PM

Feb 22,2007 Rock On

keep rocking; keep doing what you are doing. Not always related to music or dancing; similar usage as keep the faith.



lolasdeb - 2/22/2007 at 05:47 PM

Love Humble Pie!


Ayla - 2/22/2007 at 05:58 PM

Rock On

Hey kid, rock and roll
Rock on, ooh my soul
Hey kid, boogie too, did ya

Hey shout, summertime blues
Jump up and down in my blue suede shoes
Hey kid, rock and roll, rock on

And where do we go from here
Which is the way that's clear

Still looking for that blue jean, baby queen
Prettiest girl I've ever seen
See her shake on the movie screen, Jimmy Dean
(James Dean)

---- Instrumental Interlude ----

And where do we go from here
Which is the way that's clear

Still looking for that blue jean, baby queen
Prettiest girl I've ever seen
See her shake on the movie screen, Jimmy Dean
Jimmy Dean
Rock on

Hey, hey
Rock on


dutchoneill - 2/23/2007 at 01:47 PM

Feb 23,2007 Heavily Into or Heavy Into

extremely interested in something or someone. Example: "jim is heavily into Susan, who is heavily into astrology. Heavy into is the later, condensed evolution of the phrase. Heavily into was considered gramatically correct at the beginning of the 1960's, yet heavy into became correct along the way.

Again... I LOVE their examples

Of course I knew enough people that were heavily into some not so nice drugs back then, ugly scene.


LexABB - 2/23/2007 at 03:10 PM

quote:
Feb 23,2007 Heavily Into or Heavy Into

extremely interested in something or someone. Example: "jim is heavily into Susan, who is heavily into astrology. Heavy into is the later, condensed evolution of the phrase. Heavily into was considered gramatically correct at the beginning of the 1960's, yet heavy into became correct along the way.

Again... I LOVE their examples

Of course I knew enough people that were heavily into some not so nice drugs back then, ugly scene.


Does this count the same as She's so heavy? meaning I am hell I don't know what it means


Ayla - 2/23/2007 at 03:31 PM


Marty McFly: Wait a minute, Doc, are you trying to tell me that my mother has got the hots for me?

Dr. Emmett Brown: Precisely.

Marty McFly: Whoa, this is heavy.

Dr. Emmett Brown: There's that word again; " heavy". Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?


dutchoneill - 2/23/2007 at 03:48 PM

quote:

Marty McFly: Wait a minute, Doc, are you trying to tell me that my mother has got the hots for me?

Dr. Emmett Brown: Precisely.

Marty McFly: Whoa, this is heavy.

Dr. Emmett Brown: There's that word again; " heavy". Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?



cupofjo - 2/23/2007 at 10:39 PM

quote:
quote:

Marty McFly: Wait a minute, Doc, are you trying to tell me that my mother has got the hots for me?

Dr. Emmett Brown: Precisely.

Marty McFly: Whoa, this is heavy.

Dr. Emmett Brown: There's that word again; " heavy". Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?







I love that movie.


cupofjo - 2/23/2007 at 10:41 PM

I want you
I want you so bad
I want you
I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad

I want you
I want you so bad, babe
I want you
I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad

I want you
I want you so bad, babe
I want you
I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad

I want you
I want you so bad
I want you
I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad

She's so heavy
Heavy, heavy, heavy

She's so heavy
She's so heavy
Heavy, heavy, heavy

I want you
I want you so bad
I want you
I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad

I want you
You know I want you so bad, babe
I want you
You know I want you so bad
It's driving me mad
It's driving me mad
Yeah

She's so


dutchoneill - 2/24/2007 at 01:43 PM

Feb 24-25, 2007 Harrison, George (1943-2001)

the lead guitar player for the Beatles, George enjoyed some commercial and critical acclaim as a solo artist after the breakup of the Beatles in 1970. His first solo album, the 1970 three record set All Things Must Pass is a true classic. Harrison was also the driving force behind the 1971 Bangladesh relief concert at Madison Square Garden, creating a precedent by which all future benefit concerts are judged. We are so fortunate to have had George harrison in this world. For the rest of our lives, we have his music to rejuvinate us.


cupofjo - 2/25/2007 at 02:55 AM

Isn't it a pity
Isn't it a shame
How we break each other's hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other's love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Isn't it a pity

Some things take so long
But how do i explain
When not too many people
Can see we're all the same
And because of all their tears
Your eyes can't hope to see
The beauty that surrounds them
Now, isn't it a pity

Isn't it a pity, (oh-o)
Now, isn't is a shame
How we break each other's hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other's love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Now, isn't it a pity


dutchoneill - 2/25/2007 at 03:11 AM

quote:
Isn't it a pity
Isn't it a shame
How we break each other's hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other's love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Isn't it a pity

Some things take so long
But how do i explain
When not too many people
Can see we're all the same
And because of all their tears
Your eyes can't hope to see
The beauty that surrounds them
Now, isn't it a pity

Isn't it a pity, (oh-o)
Now, isn't is a shame
How we break each other's hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other's love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Now, isn't it a pity


I was just listening to that today Rob
Well said


becksbolero - 2/25/2007 at 04:48 AM

George Harrison on Rutland Weekend Television

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AarhZScyuz0


Ayla - 2/26/2007 at 04:29 PM


Great sig pic cupofjo



George was always my favorite Beatle


cupofjo - 2/26/2007 at 08:46 PM

Thanks


dutchoneill - 2/26/2007 at 10:08 PM

Feb 26,2007 Black is Beautiful

the expression of pride in African American heritage. For generations, African Americans were made to feel inferior, and during the 1960's and 1970's the quest for self-esteem spawned interest in many things, such as Afro clothing, hairstyles, Black history` and ethnic studies. The term, Black is Beautiful was echoed in celebration of this newfound pride. Malcolm X and others spoke of how much more attractive skin of color was than pale white, pigmentless skin of the Caucasian.


Ayla - 2/27/2007 at 04:59 AM

Black is Beautiful

A related movement rose in the 1970s to dispel the notion that black people's natural features, skin color, and hair were inherently "ugly." The movement asked that men and women stop straightening their hair and attempting to lighten or bleach their skin, claiming they were trying to "look more white." The prevailing idea in America culture was that black features were less attractive or desirable than white features. .

The movement is largely responsible for the popularity of the Afro. Today it lives on in cornrows, dreadlocks, and many other hairstyles that were unfamiliar to African Americans prior to the 70s. Most importantly, it gave a generation of African Americans the courage to feel good about who they are and how they look.


dutchoneill - 2/27/2007 at 09:03 AM

Say it Loud....


dutchoneill - 2/27/2007 at 12:13 PM

Feb 27,2007 "Better Red than Dead"


a propaganda phrase by the establishment againist Communist sympathizers and antiwar protesters.


cupofjo - 2/27/2007 at 10:00 PM

quote:
Say it Loud....






I'm Black and I'm Proud



cupofjo - 2/27/2007 at 10:10 PM

quote:
Feb 27,2007 "Better Red than Dead"


a propaganda phrase by the establishment againist Communist sympathizers and antiwar protesters.







dutchoneill - 2/28/2007 at 03:13 PM

Feb 28,2007 Puff the Magic Dragon

the title of a 1963 Peter, Paul and Mary song. It was assumed that the dragon represented marijuana, but no one in the group has ever confirmed the interpretation.


lolasdeb - 2/28/2007 at 03:36 PM

Remember this from way back in the Peter, Paul, and Mary days but now everytime I hear this song I think of Meet the Parents - LOL


Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee,
Little jackie paper loved that rascal puff,
And brought him strings and sealing wax and other fancy stuff. oh

Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee,
Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee.

Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail
Jackie kept a lookout perched on puffs gigantic tail,
Noble kings and princes would bow wheneer they came,
Pirate ships would lower their flag when puff roared out his name. oh!

Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee,
Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee.

A dragon lives forever but not so little boys
Painted wings and giant rings make way for other toys.
One grey night it happened, jackie paper came no more
And puff that mighty dragon, he ceased his fearless roar.

His head was bent in sorrow, green scales fell like rain,
Puff no longer went to play along the cherry lane.
Without his life-long friend, puff could not be brave,
So puff that mighty dragon sadly slipped into his cave. oh!

Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee,
Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea
And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called honah lee


cupofjo - 2/28/2007 at 10:14 PM

Do you remember The Marvelous Toy from that album? I love that song. You usually here it at Christmas time.


dutchoneill - 3/1/2007 at 12:35 PM

March 1,2007 David Shapiro

the Columbia University student whose photo appeared in Life magazine, showing him sitting in the University president's chair, smoking the president's cigar, during the seizure of five campus buidings by 680 militants in April 1968.

To me, 1968 was the most volitile year I can remeber from the 60's. Boby Kennedy, MLK, the Columbia riots the SDS and the escalation of Vietnam and the Tet offensive, crazy times for sure.

What I found funny about this one (they're all funny in one way or another) is the word militants


curry - 3/2/2007 at 03:24 AM

Meet the Parents

Greg Focker: well some people think that to 'puff the magic dragon' means to puff...smoke a marijuana cigarette


Jack Bynes: Puff is just the name of the boy's magical dragon....you a pothead, Focker?


cupofjo - 3/2/2007 at 01:03 PM

quote:
March 1,2007 David Shapiro

the Columbia University student whose photo appeared in Life magazine, showing him sitting in the University president's chair, smoking the president's cigar, during the seizure of five campus buidings by 680 militants in April 1968.

To me, 1968 was the most volitile year I can remeber from the 60's. Boby Kennedy, MLK, the Columbia riots the SDS and the escalation of Vietnam and the Tet offensive, crazy times for sure.

What I found funny about this one (they're all funny in one way or another) is the word militants


You know as much as I envied not being old enough to experience the 60s I am glad that I was to young to fully understand it. Those were some of the most volatile times in our history.
I remember a story a friend of mine was telling me he was protesting the war in D.C. and he and a bunch of other were arressted. Thousands were arrested and they used RFK stadium as a detention center. His friend wore a jock strap that had the american flag! He had the snot beat out of him by the police. He said it was awful on both sides. The police with dogs, riot gear and no tolerence. He also said some of the protesters deserved to get a beating too!

Every time I hear You Can't Always Get What You Want, when the sing the line.........
"And I went down to the demonstration to get my fair share of abuse" I always think of Steve and that story.


dutchoneill - 3/2/2007 at 08:49 PM

March 2,2007 Cheesbuger

the epitomie of twentieth-century bad eating habits. The bane of a all vegetarians. A word used to describe the decadance of the fast food culture that sprung up in the 1950s and expanded throughout the rest of the century. Example: "He's a real cheesburger, and look at that striped tie!" A conversatin between Flower and River: I saw Gondolf downtown eating a cheesburger" " No, how gross!" "And he had to put on shoes to go in the place!" "God, what is this ciommune coming to?"

LMAO
There examples kill me


dutchoneill - 3/3/2007 at 12:02 PM

March 3-4, 2007 gestalt

the totality of life's experiences, activities and emotions. The total good and bad of existence. Example: "He doesn't appreciate the gestalt of life, so he hides under the bed." From the German word meaning form or shape.


dutchoneill - 3/5/2007 at 01:57 PM

March 5,2007 Vibes

short for vibrations. feelings emanating from a person,place or situation. A term introduced to the American public in 1965.


Ayla - 3/5/2007 at 04:19 PM


Vibes

Good Vibes At The Spectrum



Good Vibes At The Spectrum - The Spectrum, Montreal, Canada, 17aug84


Listening to this man will always give me "GREAT VIBES"


dutchoneill - 3/6/2007 at 12:21 PM

March 6,2007 altered state of conciousness

(ASC) an elevated mental experience. An occaison when a person's thinking processes have reached a place beyond the normal, everyday concens of the ego. Used to describe either the meditative or drug-induced state of mind. A necessary component of certain occult practices, including divination, meditation, and a proper tarot reading. John Hurt starred in a movie entitled Altered States (1980) a fantasy about altered states through a sensory deprivation tank.

I always like that move Altered States, kinda dated and corny but still a good movie to watch.


lolasdeb - 3/6/2007 at 04:39 PM

quote:
John Hurt starred in a movie entitled Altered States (1980) a fantasy about altered states through a sensory deprivation tank.
I remember this movie - quite trippy...especially when his body went through that bumpy kind of morph state.

Have experienced an altered state or ten (or ???) myself (especially during the 70's) with the help of Owsley Stanley (fortunately no bumpy body morphing occurred).

Was previously in the Haiku thread and found my state being altered naturally.


[Edited on 3/7/2007 by lolasdeb]


cupofjo - 3/6/2007 at 11:28 PM

He He, I have had my fair share of altered states No More!

BTW! That was a good movie.


lolasdeb - 3/7/2007 at 01:48 AM

quote:
Example: "He's a real cheesburger, and look at that striped tie!" A conversatin between Flower and River: I saw Gondolf downtown eating a cheesburger" " No, how gross!" "And he had to put on shoes to go in the place!" "God, what is this ciommune coming to?"
LMAO - with you on this one Dutch - the examples are gems.


Ayla - 3/7/2007 at 06:18 AM

altered state of conciousness


quote:
He He, I have had my fair share of altered states



Right there with ya, or should I say been out there .....



dutchoneill - 3/7/2007 at 11:43 AM

March 7,2007....out to lunch

tired, distracted, or unable to respond adequately. Example: "Bill is out to lunch; you could talk to the wallpaper and get better results.


cupofjo - 3/7/2007 at 11:56 AM

quote:
altered state of conciousness


quote:
He He, I have had my fair share of altered states



Right there with ya, or should I say been out there .....





You mean out to lunch


cupofjo - 3/7/2007 at 11:58 AM

You know Ed! You are right with the examples. They are corny but so corny you have to laugh.


Ayla - 3/7/2007 at 02:46 PM

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
altered state of conciousness



quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
He He, I have had my fair share of altered states
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----




Right there with ya, or should I say been out there .....



--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



You mean out to lunch









Oh YEAH !!!!




lolasdeb - 3/7/2007 at 04:46 PM

quote:
Example: "Bill is out to lunch; you could talk to the wallpaper and get better results.
LMAO - again with the sparkling examples!


PeterNelson - 3/8/2007 at 12:22 AM

"Out to lunch"--I didn't know the hippies invented that term. It's really lodged itself thoroughly in the American mainstream. It's quicker--and nicer--than
"The lights are on, but nobody's home" or
"He's not playing with a full deck."


dutchoneill - 3/8/2007 at 09:49 PM

March 8,2007 Canned Heat


a California based band formed in 1865, whose classic hits of the era included, "On the Road Again" and "Going up the Country". It burst on the scene at Monterry Pop, played at Woodstock; and was featured at the beginning of the Woodstock movie. In 1970, cofounder Al Wilson died, and in 1981, cofounder and lead singer Bob The Bear Hite died, but the other members carried on with various personnel changes. Guitarist Harvey Mandel was a member for a while. One memorable album was the 1969 collaboration with bluesman John Lee Hooker called Hooker and Heat.

I saw the original band back in the day, I think Al Wilson was called The Blind Owl, because of the thick glasses he wore, but he was one great guitar player.


lolasdeb - 3/8/2007 at 11:39 PM

LOVE Canned Heat. They are touring still but I haven't heard the current line up. Fito De La Parra is the only one left from the old days. (and yes - Alan Wilson was nicknamed Blind Owl)


dutchoneill - 3/9/2007 at 12:38 PM

March 9,2007 "End the War in Vietnam - Bring the Troops Home Now"

an early anti-war slogan seen on placards at rallieis againdt the Vietnam War. Contrary to belief by some people and propaganda by the conservative press, the counterculture did not blame young soldiers for the war, and they did not wish them harm.



My sense/ercollection is that a lot of blame, for lack of a better word, was laid at the feet of the troops. Most of them didn't want to be there, they were really the unfortunate of our generation. They wern't rich and they wern't in college so they were fodder for the military. You hear about guys who came back and they were verbally abused and made to feel unwelcomed home. I guess its what you choose to believe about who, what, where and why when it comes to recollections about that time.

All I know is that a good friend told me that his major issue with coming home was that 24 hours before he was home he was on his patrol on a PBR (patrol boat river), when his shift was done his orders were handed to him, he was put on a helicopter, then a plane then 24 hours later he was sitting at home. Must have realyy screwed with a lot of guys heads.


cupofjo - 3/9/2007 at 10:51 PM

I think it really stinks in how the Vietnam vets were treated. I befriended a guy who was really effed up from that war and he got squat for help. He ended up getting some of the much needed help that was due to him but not until he suffered a long time.

He was always having nightmares from the war. He woke up almost nightly from whatever he encountered over there. He would wake up screaming, fighting and many times wake up with his hands around his wife's throat! He indulged in a lot of drugs to ease his pain. He never would tell me about the nightmares only said he wanted to forget about them. He never talked about the war. When I tried asking him he would get angry with me. He is very bitter towards the Gov't for not helping him sooner.


dutchoneill - 3/9/2007 at 11:21 PM

My friend also told me and I've heard it from other Viet vets that if they were in camp and a incoming alarm went off and they went underground, you either grabbed your bag of weed or your bottle. Real bad time for those guys/girls over there.


piacere - 3/9/2007 at 11:48 PM

quote:
"Out to lunch"--I didn't know the hippies invented that term. It's really lodged itself thoroughly in the American mainstream. It's quicker--and nicer--than
"The lights are on, but nobody's home" or
"He's not playing with a full deck."


...or, "a few fries short of a Happy Meal".


dutchoneill - 3/10/2007 at 01:29 PM

March 10/11, 2007 Colors

the jacket worn by the Hells Angels bikers. It is normally a Levi's or jeans jacket with the sleeves cut off. Club insignia are uaually on the back, and other patches express the interests or philosophies of the wearer.


Club insignia are uaually on the back, and other patches express the interests or philosophies of the wearer....boy these sound like fun clubs,I wonder what patches they wear to express their other interests or philosohies?


PeterNelson - 3/10/2007 at 02:36 PM

quote:
quote:
"Out to lunch" . . .
"The lights are on, but nobody's home" or
"He's not playing with a full deck."
...or, "a few fries short of a Happy Meal".
Mark, I never buy meals at McD's, so I don't use that one, but yeah, it totally fits! There's a bunch of them, aren't there?

Here's a semicommon one [semicommon > ";"] heard late last night when my CBS station was playing a drama that had been postponed due to the Big 10 tournament in the evening. The prosecution was discussing whether a confessed killer could stand trial:
"I don't know that he's retarded, legally speaking, but let's just say
he's not the sharpest knife in the drawer."

Early on, the defense got all up in a wad over the non-PC use of the term "retarded." They insisted that everyone say "has mental retardation, or M.R." So, for the whole show everybody's going, like, "Does the defendant's M.R. fall below the legal threshold?" and "Determining M.R. is as much art as science." Is that retarded, or what?


piacere - 3/10/2007 at 02:45 PM

PeterNelson

in the age of PCness, I'm surprised that "non-studious" or "cognitive malfunction" wasn't/isn't used.

again, these ARE lawyers. Retards.


PeterNelson - 3/10/2007 at 03:11 PM

Good morning, Mark. It's not just the lawyers anymore, of course. When's the last time you ever heard anybody admit their kid was stupid? (Not that anybody ever admitted it quite like that in the first place.) Now every "non-studious" student has some sort of "learning disability."

Well, I guess when you're dealing with kids, the thing is to get to the specific problem and remedy it, and a term like "stupid" or "slow" doesn't help at all. But the PC thing about the term "retarded" is not to use it as an insult because it hurts the feelings of real retarded people and their families. Now in this show, they're saying you couldn't even use the term "retarded" in a clinically descriptive manner, according to level of I.Q. and legal standing. I've never heard that before.

That's a weird PC stretch. That's like taking a neutral descriptive term that's also used as a mild insult, in different contexts, like "deaf," and because it's used some places as an insult, it becomes a taboo word and has to be tiptoed around in all cases:
Old meaning: "He became deaf as the result of a childhood fever, losing all his hearing."
Mild insult, in other contexts: "What, are you deaf?!"
Alternative due to PC taboo: "He isn't deaf; he 'has auditory deafness.' "
Not saying people say this, but that's how silly this "retarded" / "has M.R." thing is.

How idiotic, moronic, or cretinous (all diagnostic levels ) is that?


piacere - 3/10/2007 at 03:31 PM

...and the scientific/medical community has to take a step back, a deep breath...and evaluate and re-configure their terminology in order to not offend anyone.

oh, Ozzie and Harriet, where for art thou?


PeterNelson - 3/11/2007 at 12:21 PM

Ozzie & Harriet make me proud to be a Nelson.

quote:
March 10/11, 2007 Colors . . .

Club insignia are usually on the back, and other patches express the interests or philosophies of the wearer....boy these sound like fun clubs,I wonder what patches they wear to express their other interests or philosophies?
.


dutchoneill - 3/12/2007 at 07:37 PM

March 12,2007 No Way or No Way Jose

an emphatic or humorous way to say no. Introduced to the general American public in 1865. each successive generation likes to think that it posses its own individuality of thought, style, and vocabulary. The truth of the maytter is that each generation builds on the generations before it, and in some cases, after a few years when it thinks no one will remember or care, it outright staels from the previous generations. No Way is a good example. Originally a beatnik phrase. "There is no way I'll wear that tie, man." Shortened and popularized in the 1960's and then readopted in the 1990's.


lolasdeb - 3/12/2007 at 08:09 PM

quote:
Originally a beatnik phrase. "There is no way I'll wear that tie, man."
Those wacky, non-conformist beatnik's! LOL


curry - 3/13/2007 at 02:22 AM

the beats recognised 'it' for what 'it' was, torch carriers...however, some of their poetry was impossible for me to understand. 'On the Road'

now this thread can eat itself


curry - 3/13/2007 at 02:23 AM

quote:
PeterNelson

in the age of PCness, I'm surprised that "non-studious" or "cognitive malfunction" wasn't/isn't used.

again, these ARE lawyers. Retards.


I love that 70s show where Red is constantly calling his son 'dumbass'


cupofjo - 3/13/2007 at 11:09 AM

quote:
quote:
Originally a beatnik phrase. "There is no way I'll wear that tie, man."
Those wacky, non-conformist beatnik's! LOL


If they had these maybe they would have worn them!


dutchoneill - 3/13/2007 at 12:19 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Originally a beatnik phrase. "There is no way I'll wear that tie, man."
Those wacky, non-conformist beatnik's! LOL


If they had these maybe they would have worn them!




Back in my Corporate America days I was always shopping for dress shirts and Ties but I always passed on by the JGarcia tie. Just wasn't my style.


dutchoneill - 3/13/2007 at 12:22 PM

March 13,2007 Glossolalia

the speaking in unknown or nonexistent tounges. Words such as this and gnosis are religious and biblical and thus not new to the wworld before the hippie era, but they achieved new and expanded use in the vocabulary of the Western world through the counterculture.

WTF??
Did I miss something in the 60's and 70's (I know I did)?
This is new to me.


Ayla - 3/13/2007 at 12:49 PM


quote:
WTF??
Did I miss something in the 60's and 70's (I know I did)?
This is new to me.



Yeah, I missed that boat also !


harvey - 3/13/2007 at 01:31 PM

I don't think glossolalia and tongues should be mentioned on a family website


dutchoneill - 3/13/2007 at 03:28 PM

quote:
I don't think glossolalia and tongues should be mentioned on a family website


Colin stopping in on the Hoippie Calendar


harvey - 3/13/2007 at 04:17 PM

quote:
quote:
I don't think glossolalia and tongues should be mentioned on a family website


Colin stopping in on the Hoippie Calendar


Hey Ed ... is a "Hoippie" what they call a Hippy from New Joisey


lolasdeb - 3/13/2007 at 05:15 PM

quote:
WTF??
Did I miss something in the 60's and 70's (I know I did)?
This is new to me.

news to me, too, dutch (although I have probably muttrered a few unknowns in my day )


dutchoneill - 3/13/2007 at 11:20 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't think glossolalia and tongues should be mentioned on a family website


Colin stopping in on the Hoippie Calendar


Hey Ed ... is a "Hoippie" what they call a Hippy from New Joisey


I have to get these fingers whittled down a bit


harvey - 3/13/2007 at 11:54 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't think glossolalia and tongues should be mentioned on a family website


Colin stopping in on the Hoippie Calendar


Hey Ed ... is a "Hoippie" what they call a Hippy from New Joisey


I have to get these fingers whittled down a bit


Heh-heh


cupofjo - 3/14/2007 at 12:12 AM

Glossolalia: the speaking in unknown or nonexistent tounges caused by self indulgence of to many drugs and to much alcohol

No wonder you didnt remember it


dutchoneill - 3/14/2007 at 12:11 PM

quote:
Glossolalia: the speaking in unknown or nonexistent tounges caused by self indulgence of to many drugs and to much alcohol

No wonder you didnt remember it


Thanks Rob


dutchoneill - 3/14/2007 at 12:14 PM

March 14,2007 Disneyland

a place of fantasy. Unnatural circumstances. originally a theme park in Southern california. During the Hippie era, it came to mean any thing or place that was unreal or phony.


OK, is the author making this stuff up just to fill this calendar?

I've been top La La land, that place is fun.

I was also at DisneyLand in Southern california in the early 70's with a couple of my druggie friends. Now that was a weird time.


piacere - 3/14/2007 at 02:06 PM

Goofy rules.


cupofjo - 3/15/2007 at 01:10 AM


cupofjo - 3/15/2007 at 01:11 AM


Ayla - 3/15/2007 at 02:18 PM


Disneyland USA

Orange County Police Invade

Date: August 6, 1970

On this day in 1970 a group of "hippies" obtained entrance to Disneyland in Anaheim California. They ran rampant over the park, attempting to claim "Tom Sawyer's Island" for themselves. Disneyland, not knowing how to handle this breach of customary etiquette, called in the Orange County Police who arrived in full riot gear. The park was closed and all visitors were asked to depart, leaving Disneyland empty except for the remaining hippies. This was the first time the park was closed early. Earlier Disneyland was infamous for its policy of refusing entry to young men wearing beards, a common practice in California and especially in some cities of Orange County. No rain-check was given to the departing visitors.



Police take Main Street


cupofjo - 3/15/2007 at 07:46 PM

That police man to the right is looking to hit someone


dutchoneill - 3/16/2007 at 01:15 AM

Wow, the day got away from me today...

March 15, 2007 Castle, the

a large stone castle like house in the Feliz Hills of Los Angeles, alifornia. In 1966, it was a gathering place for members of the beat and hippie movement as well as musical and art luminaries, such as Bob Dylan, Andy Warhol, Lou reed, Nico, David Crosby, and Robbie Robertson. Owned by John Phillip Law, Tom Law and Jim Simmons, it was the home of future members of the Hog Farm, including photographer Lisa law. Many well-known rock artists' photographs were taken at The Castle.


This is another "news to me" post.


Ayla - 3/16/2007 at 12:40 PM




Many of their guests-including Bob Dylan, David Crosby, and Andy Warhol-became celebrities of the counterculture.

Looks good to me .......


lolasdeb - 3/16/2007 at 03:45 PM

It is in the Los Feliz hills of Los Angeles, and was owned by Tom Law who worked for Albert Grossman. Lisa Law's book Flashing on the Sixties relates some of what took place here when the Law's owned it.

"The Castle was found by Jack Simons who was a real estate investor and a good friend of John Law. John and Tom Law invested in the Castle with Jack in 1965. At that time, Tom Law was working as assistant to the director for Mike Nichols during the filming of' Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf'. Lisa Bachelis and Tom had met at a Peter Paul and Mary concert that same year in Berkeley. Lisa was the personal manager to Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, and Tom was the road manager for Peter Paul and Mary. Tom and Lisa fell in love and Lisa moved to the castle during the winter of 1965.

The Castle rapidly became the hang out for musicians, poets, actors, political activists, and pranksters. Singer Barry McGuire moved into the suite on the first floor and Actor Severn Darden took up residence in the opium den in the basement. Patrick Close, a close friend of Lenny Bruce lived in the basement as well and Tom and Lisa lived in the tower room which overlooked the 3 acres of jade gardens. Bob Dylan rented one of the suites on the second floor during a stay in 1966 and Albert Grossman visited the castle many times during his stay. Grossman was also the manager of Peter Paul and Mary, thus the connection with Tom Law.

When the Velvet Underground had a gig at the Trip on Sunset strip, Andy Warhol and the Velvet Underground stayed at the castle as well. This is where they met Severn Darden and Lou Reed wrote him into a song. Lisa Law shot the first Tim Hardin album cover in the garden and Richard and Mimi Farina sang a duet in the ballroom. Tiny Tim played and sang off the balcony and Allen Ginsberg recited poetry in front of the massive fireplace in the ballroom.

For one year, the Castle was the Mecca for the music scene. Tom and Lisa left to move to Yelapa, Mexico and a few years later the Castle was sold for less than it was purchased for. Since then it has had four owners. Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers had the gardens totally redone and when he was made an offer he could not refuse, he sold it to John Paul Getty Jr. who owns it today. The Castle no longer has the original gold leaf sealing but the ambiance of the majestic dining room and ballroom still has not lost its allure and the walls still resound with the tunes of the the Beatles singing their album 'Rubber Soul' as Tom and Lisa Law danced their wild and free dance... the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers of the new age."


piacere - 3/16/2007 at 03:52 PM

not too unlike a castle at DisneyLand. I see the correlation.


dutchoneill - 3/17/2007 at 03:39 PM

Yikes, missed a day...

March 16,2007 My Lai

a Vietnamese villlage where 567 civilians were killed by US soldiers in an "interdiction" on March 16,1968. Tweny five soldiers, including officers, were court martialed, but all ere exonerated or found not gulity except Lt. William Calley, who may have been the scapegoat foe the entire miltary system. Calley was paroled in 1975, after serving only 3 1/2 years of a 10 year sentence.


dutchoneill - 3/17/2007 at 03:44 PM

March 17-18, 2006 feminine principle or female force

in esoteric philosophy, the receptive, passive, and the negative aspect of the cosmos. Matter, form, and wisdom are usually considered feminine and are represented by goddesses in the pantheon of multiple god religions.


Happily, I know about the fermale force


PeterNelson - 3/19/2007 at 02:33 AM

Dutch, I got a Dennis Hopper update on this:

quote:
quote:
He's most recently being seen in some lame TV commercial for some money-managing company, where he's saying "your generation" (boomers) isn't going to "retire" in the old sense. The main lamesters are whoever wrote the commercial, but Dennis loses points for being the spokesman.
Valuable "Cool" points at that Peter.
This afternoon I saw one of these commercials I hadn't seen before. The tagline at the end of the commercial is with Dennis standing in a field of sunflowers, saying
"Flower Power was then;
dreams are now."



I think this is the moment he's saying it. He seemed so oily the way he delivered it, plus he's wagging that finger at the camera.

The company is Ameriprise Financial. Here are excerpts from a press release about this ad campaign with Hopper (uh-oh--now I'm calling him "Hopper" instead of "Dennis"):

New Evolution of Ameriprise Financial Advertising Emphasizes that "Dreams Don't Retire"
Broadcast ads feature actor Dennis Hopper and a 1960s-style red chair

MINNEAPOLIS — September 7, 2006 — Dreams don't retire. That's what Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (NYSE: AMP) is telling over 78 million baby boomers in a new advertising campaign that launches this Sunday, Sept. 10, during the first regular season broadcast of NBC Sunday Night Football at 8 p.m. eastern. The broadcast ads will feature a celebrity familiar to the boomer generation, actor Dennis Hopper. . . .

"Last year's groundbreaking campaign launched the Ameriprise Financial brand and focused on what we do to help boomers achieve their retirement dreams," says Jim Cracchiolo, chairman and chief executive officer of Ameriprise Financial. "Now we're telling boomers how we're redefining financial planning. It all begins with understanding our clients' dreams."

The ads are set in a variety of locations--including a beach, salt flats, and field of wildflowers--that convey the serenity many boomers hope to achieve in retirement. Sitting within these tranquil settings on a 1960s-style red chair is Hopper.

. . . Says Kim Sharan, EVP and chief marketing and communications officer of Ameriprise Financial, ". . . There is no better figure to personify our message than legendary actor Dennis Hopper, who embodies the spirit of the generation. With his help we are speaking with boomers, not at them."

In the broadcast ads, Hopper adopts a conversational style. . . .

This is an evolution of the advertising campaign that Ameriprise Financial launched in September 2005 as an independent, publicly-owned company following the spinoff from American Express Company, the sixth largest spinoff in corporate history.

http://www.ameriprise.com/amp/global/press-center/press-release-80.asp


piacere - 3/19/2007 at 01:10 PM

quote:
March 17-18, 2006 feminine principle or female force

in esoteric philosophy, the receptive, passive, and the negative aspect of the cosmos. Matter, form, and wisdom are usually considered feminine and are represented by goddesses in the pantheon of multiple god religions.


Happily, I know about the fermale force


me too, which is why I do not believe in multiple god religions.


dutchoneill - 3/19/2007 at 10:42 PM

March 19,2007 Great Unwashed, the

a term used to describe the beat generation and then again, the hippies. I don't know who started the myth that hippies were dirty. After all, hippies made hot tubs popular and introduced co-ed showering to the general public. True hippies were no less hygenic than any other segment of the population; at times, the facilities weren't available. But whenever a hppie settled down somewhere, bathing accomodations were some of the first amneities required after cooking and sleeping. After all, hippies were very decadent, and what is more decadent than a luscious bath?


A director I once worked for called Hot Tubs "old man soup"


curry - 3/20/2007 at 01:12 AM

I recall Abbie Hoffman saying something about using deodorant as a cop out to the 'Establishment' and I thought his stuff was exclusively political \\\

'dirty Wookie'


dutchoneill - 3/20/2007 at 12:20 PM

March 20,2007 "Bomb them back into the Stone Age"

a threat made in 1965 by member of the U.S. Joint Chief of Staff Curtis lemay (1960-1990), in reference to the North Vietnamese.

I love the stupidity of that statement. It refelects the old school belief that we could identify and defeat our enemy. If you think about it, Vietnam was the beginning of a terrorist movement; you could not identify your enemy. It took a long time before the military minds adjusted (or may not have yet) to the idea that our enemy was identifiable to our troops.


curry - 3/20/2007 at 01:08 PM

...and ironically, its generally some poor sods' country that is barely beyond the stone age civilisation that the US Govt. tends to attempt to bomb back to the stone age...

sorry, could'nt resist.


PeterNelson - 3/20/2007 at 01:49 PM

quote:
March 20,2007 "Bomb them back into the Stone Age"

a threat made in 1965 by member of the U.S. Joint Chief of Staff Curtis lemay (1960-1990), in reference to the North Vietnamese.

I love the stupidity of that statement. It refelects the old school belief that we could identify and defeat our enemy. If you think about it, Vietnam was the beginning of a terrorist movement; you could not identify your enemy. It took a long time before the military minds adjusted (or may not have yet) to the idea that our enemy was identifiable to our troops.
Dutch, Gen. LeMay was definitely old school. He was the chief architect of the WWII strategy of bombing Japan into submission. Before the famous nuclear weapons that did the trick were ready, this involved massive firebombing raids by our B-29s.

.

Before the strategy was implemented, though, there was an ethical problem to get past. Because of the frequent interspersal of Japanese industrial targets throughout residential neighborhoods, and because of the highly flammable nature of the residences, it was going to be impossible to avoid huge civilian casualties if we went after industry. This was justified by LeMay on the grounds that every Japanese civilian had pledged undying support to the emperor and was therefore a combatant. (I've seen this in old Air Corps documents his name is on.)

Given the suicidal self-defense virtually the entire Japanese populace was trained to inflict on an invading army, this characterization of them all as combatants is almost legit. (Of course there are innocents like children, and it's not legit in other big ways. But it was technically legitimate enough to allow this bombing.) It would be much harder to justify characterizing the Vietnamese people in such a way.

Other: LeMay headed the air operations of the Berlin Airlift.
LeMay was George Wallace's running mate in the 1968 presidential election.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/bomb/peopleevents/pandeAMEX61.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtis_LeMay


piacere - 3/20/2007 at 01:52 PM

I don't remember the "Stoned Age".


Ayla - 3/21/2007 at 03:17 AM





dutchoneill - 3/21/2007 at 07:39 PM

March 21,2007 solid

A term of approval. This word eveolved during the beat and hipie eras from a purely inamimate physical definition to a term describing human emotions. As a beatnik term, it was often a conversation filler. Example: "Sold man, lets play bongos". In the hippie era, it moved on to describe more of a literal appreciation of skill.
Example: "he's a solid bongo player"

Again, the examples kille me.
My first exposure to solid was from Link in Mod Squad



PeterNelson - 3/21/2007 at 10:52 PM

Haaa --even as a kid during the hippie era, Dutch, I knew that bongos were out, a relic of the beatnik and folk eras.

Yeah, the first black kid I was friends with was Link, too! His name was actually Leroy, and he and I and this girl I liked would always talk in the hall before my drafting class. We styled ourselves the Mod Squad, with me being Pete, of course, him as Link, and Debbie as Julie. That's what we called each other all the time, anyway. This was in 7th grade, and I think Leroy-Link was in that drafting class with me--we didn't have a single African American in my whole K-6 grade school! Debbie-Julie might have been in an English class across the hall or something. And none of us three looked like our Mod Squad counterpart, but it worked.

.

Speaking of Julie, actress Peggy Lipton was married to Quincy Jones for a while. I just found out (by watching Letterman) that the actress who plays Karen on The Office is their daughter Rashida Jones. Solid!
http://www.wireimage.com/GalleryListing.asp?nbc1=1&navtyp=CAL====132364 &ym=200508
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rashida_Jones

Knowing this background now, it makes something I saw on The Office a couple weeks ago all the more funny and outrageous. The Stamford, CT, office branch was merged into the Scranton, PA, office, so Karen (Rashida), Jim, and these others were greeted by Michael as they'd come in for their first day at Scranton. Michael is like, "You must be Karen Filipelli. You look very . . . exotic. Was your father a G.I.?"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karen_Filippelli

[Edited on 2007.3.22 by PeterNelson]


Ayla - 3/22/2007 at 04:34 AM

March 21,2007 solid


Another swing-era superlative meaning
good or great.
Ex: "Solid", jackson! (Good work.)
Ex: "Some of you cats
are not on the beam.
I know what's wrong, you've
been cooking with cream.
Now if you want a beat
that's "Solid" and hard, Then
Fry me mama with a can of Lard"
--(Bradley Orch. Tune Lyric)


HUH ?! ok, I guess that's Solid man

Yep, gotta love the examples ... LOL


PeterNelson - 3/22/2007 at 05:02 AM

Yeah, Dutch, sorry to say, but Ayla's definition puts solid back into the swing era, which would be the '30s-'40s, whereas the hippie calendar puts our type of meaning only into the '50s. I think I trust Ayla's source more than these hippies and their crazy bongos and congos!

Think of the term solid citizen. That can't be a hippie term--that's the sort of thing, like square meal, that my dad might say! Here solid is not just a default term of praise, but it does have a specific connotation paired with citizen. So, it's not a physical solid, and in fact, it might even be a source for applying solid to any personal or emotional or musical characteristic that's particularly robust and full and steady.

There are books that would answer this. In fact, there's probably a webpage somewhere that does. But I've enjoyed speculating too much to actually look it up and perhaps have to erase my speculations in favor of facts!

Here's another usage of solid that might truly be newer than hippies, though:
"Do me a solid, man."
When did people start saying that?


dutchoneill - 3/22/2007 at 10:54 AM

March 22,2007 hichhike or hitchhiking

to solicit a ride in a car from a previously unknown person by standing along a street or road with a thumb extended in supplication.







cupofjo - 3/22/2007 at 11:27 AM

quote:
March 21,2007 solid


Another swing-era superlative meaning
good or great.
Ex: "Solid", jackson! (Good work.)
Ex: "Some of you cats
are not on the beam.
I know what's wrong, you've
been cooking with cream.
Now if you want a beat
that's "Solid" and hard, Then
Fry me mama with a can of Lard"
--(Bradley Orch. Tune Lyric)


HUH ?! ok, I guess that's Solid man

Yep, gotta love the examples ... LOL



The only thing not solid are these examples

These examples are not done by hippies.

I think the Hippie calander is solid!


cupofjo - 3/22/2007 at 11:30 AM


PeterNelson - 3/22/2007 at 02:43 PM

How to Hitchhike


Wrong




Wronger yet




Right




Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable both won Oscars for It Happened One Night (1934), which itself was Best Picture (and Frank Capra won Best Director--making a rare Oscar grand slam).


lolasdeb - 3/22/2007 at 03:29 PM

Used to hitchhike a lot back in my teens and early 20's (in fact, hitched to Iowa City in 72 to see the Allman Bros LOL). Would not even consider it in today's world. (and no - didn't use the Claudette Colbert correct method of hitching LOL)


cupofjo - 3/22/2007 at 08:48 PM

Ha Ha !

I use to hitchhike in the day. Late 70s early 80s. Never a problem. Use to get me every where.

I still pick up hitchhikers on occassion. Never with my family in the car. Lots of times they are homeless. If I have few bucks in my pocket I will give it to them.


dutchoneill - 3/22/2007 at 11:15 PM

quote:
How to Hitchhike


Wrong




Wronger yet




Right




Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable both won Oscars for It Happened One Night (1934), which itself was Best Picture (and Frank Capra won Best Director--making a rare Oscar grand slam).


Great Movie Peter


dutchoneill - 3/22/2007 at 11:20 PM

The one and only time I hitchiked was when I was in the Navy back in '69.

A couple of clowns that I was sationed with in Newport said they would give me ride to NY for a weekend home. Sadly, their idea of NY was the Nj Turnpike in the Meadowlands, where they pulled over and told me to get out or ride to Delaware with them.

A trooper picked me up in short order and very nicely dropped me off near the Lincoln Tunnel. So, I walked up the ramp, stuck out my thumb and I guess cause I had my uniform on, the first car stopped, picked me up and dropped me a few miles from home.


dutchoneill - 3/23/2007 at 08:01 PM

March 23,2007 John Wayne

any man who relies on masculine posturing for his personality. an overly patriotic man.

WTF?

And whats wrong with being overly patriotic? Jeeeez.


dutchoneill - 3/24/2007 at 01:21 PM

March 24/25 2007 Kool-Aid or The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid test is a 1968 book about ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, written bu Tom Wolfe. It deals with the consumption of LSD and other craziness of the times. Psychedelics were often consumed in food or drink, and Kool-Aid was ofetn mentioned in truth and fable as an amusing recptacle for LSD.


Mu only expereience with Electric Kool-Aid came to me at a Carol King free concert in Central Park in the summer of 1972 (Carol King and Acid??). I was sitting listening, because you couldn't see and some guy comes up with a jug and offers it to everyone in my group saying, "just fill one cheek, no more than that" I'll pass, but my buddy didn't and when I left him later that night he was still on a roller coaster ride.
Glad I passed.


Ayla - 3/24/2007 at 04:10 PM




Went on after a Vegoose show in Las Vegas 2005

That was a heck of a party weekend


curry - 3/24/2007 at 09:33 PM

What a period to be in, what with the Grateful Dead as the house band for the 'tests' - effin' A better'n E


cupofjo - 3/24/2007 at 11:49 PM

quote:

(Carol King and Acid??).




That had to be a bad trip


dutchoneill - 3/26/2007 at 02:57 PM

March 26,2007 other half (the)

people who are rich and privileged. or, if one has money and privilege, it means those who are poor. The inaccuracy of this usage is that, in the United States, only about 7 percent of the population could be considered rich. or...one's spouse. Same use as btter half.


Ayla - 3/26/2007 at 03:04 PM


I told you about strawberry fields
You know the place where nothing is real
Well here's another place you can go
Where everything flows
Looking through the bent backed tulips
To see how the other half live
Looking through a glass onion



Oh, my bad
this isn't musical word
LOL


dutchoneill - 3/27/2007 at 07:08 PM

March 27,2007 Dutsche, Rudi; "Red Rud"i or "Rudi the Red."

a young German revolutionary member of the Socialist German Student Organization (SDS), he led a student rebellion againist the West German government in 1967 and 1968, based on the free-speech movement in America.

I have never heard of the Rudi Guy. Another 'new to me' issue.


lolasdeb - 3/27/2007 at 07:45 PM

News to me, too. Attempted to find info via google and it's pretty sparse.


cupofjo - 3/27/2007 at 10:37 PM

I learned about him in world history in high school.

Taken fron Wikipedia:

Rudi Dutschke born Alfred Willi Rudi Dutschke (March 7, 1940 – December 24, 1979, Århus, Denmark) was the most prominent spokesperson of the left-wing German student movement of the 1960s. Later he was one of the founding members of the Green Party of Germany.

In 1968, he survived an assassination attempt by a right-wing extremist, living for another twelve years until related health problems caused his death.

The public assessment of Rudi Dutschke's political activities has undergone several changes, from the very aggressive condemnation by the Springer Press in the 1960s to a broad recognition today that the movement for which Dutschke was a leading spokesperson played an essential role in the democratization of German institutions in the post-World War II period.


PeterNelson - 3/28/2007 at 02:38 PM

quote:
March 27,2007 Dutsche, Rudi; "Red Rud"i or "Rudi the Red." . . .

I have never heard of the Rudi Guy. Another 'new to me' issue.
Rudi Guy? Isn't he a bluesman?

No, the first Rudi I could think of was fashion designer Rudi Geinrich, who designed the topless bathing suit. And checking, I see his last name is actually Gernreich. (He'll be a calendar entry later, no doubt. You read it here first! )

As for Rudi the Red: There's this guy:
quote:
Prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union, my wife and I had an opportunity to visit Moscow. It is a beautiful city with friendly people, all eager to help us enjoy our visit, including Rudolph Karnekov, the personal guide assigned to us by the concierge of our hotel. Moscow-born and -bred and a former member of the Politburo, Rudy was very knowledgeable about the city and every aspect of Russian life, as well. We spent every moment possible out exploring the city, despite the often unpredictable Moscow weather.

One day, as we prepared to leave the hotel for a visit to a winery on the outskirts of Moscow, it began to rain, sleet, and snow. I, at least, was sure it was snow. My wife was equally sure it was rain, and insisted upon a visit to a local department store, to purchase an umbrella. I thought the shopping spree was a waste of time--who needed an umbrella for a little snow? (Besides, I really wanted to get to that winery!)

Well, a lengthy argument ensued, which threatened to ruin the day's excursion, until my wife suggested we defer to someone whose judgment about local weather conditions was sure to be above reproach--namely, our Muscovite guide. "After all," my wife insisted, "Rudolph, the Red, knows rain, dear!"
http://www.awpi.com/Combs/Shaggy/748.html
I've heard several variations on that (and told a couple) at several Christmases and other occasions.

I do remember "Rudi the Red" Dutschke because his name always reminded me of the Christmas song, of course. Also, you might see his name sometimes in association with the German Greens, like cupofjo's Wikipedia excerpt mentions.

But that, Dutschke O'Neill, is about it.


dutchoneill - 3/28/2007 at 07:07 PM

March 28,2007 March on washington (for jobs and Freedom)

March 28,1963, gatrhering of more than 200,00 acticists at the Lincoln Memorial.

There is a whole page of small print, that I honestly don't have the energy or the time to post right now...sorry.
Things have been hectic with family and such lately, so I'll leave it at this for now. Tmorrows is shorter, so I'll post all of that

BTW, Peter you crack me up.


dutchoneill - 3/29/2007 at 07:10 PM

March 29,2007 Dirty

guilty. As oppsosed to clean. Related to Pontius Pilate's dirty hands, which he washed to cleanse himself of guilt in Christ's crucifixion. Example:"Obviously he's dirty; you don't think he could be clean and be that rich!"


Class warfare continued on the Hippie Calendar Word of the Day. It's not the 60's anymore.


cupofjo - 3/30/2007 at 11:13 AM

Because I love that dirty water
Oh, oh, Boston, you're my home (oh, yeah)


PeterNelson - 3/30/2007 at 04:13 PM

But Otie, the internet is preventing me from "getting out more"!

Thanks, Otie and Dutch. This internet deal--I think it's here to stay. It does keep me from getting out and hitting the libraries like I used to.

quote:
March 28,2007 March on washington (for jobs and Freedom)

March 28,1963, gatrhering of more than 200,00 acticists at the Lincoln Memorial.
My father and two of his brothers planned to go to this. They were all in their 40s and living within 100 miles of Chicago, where they had all grown up (us 90 miles NW, Uncle Paul 40 miles SW, and Uncle Norman still in Chicago). Something came up for Uncle Paul, so they got his teen son, Mark, to go with them instead (I was too young and ba-a-arely remember my father going; at least I think I remember the actual trip and not subsequent reminiscences ).



Not sure how the Nelson men got to D.C., but I don't believe it was by dirigible; Lincoln Memorial and Reflecting Pool, extending almost to Washington Monument, just "above" the Akron.

Five weeks ago I saw Cousin Mark at a shindig for his mother's 90th b-day (actually several activities spread over a Saturday and Sunday). On Sunday afternoon Mark told me that at the coffee hour reception between church services that morning, my mom and he had just been talking about the March on Washington. As Mom's husband, Carl, declines further into Alzheimer's, she's been getting more and more lonesome for my father, who died in 1985. She was telling Mark she was sorta collecting personal stories about my father, so they got talking about the March on Washington trip, since it was the most significant thing Mark and my dad did together.

So, Mark and I started talking about being there, too. Whereas my mom was most interested in anecdotes that would illuminate personality traits of my father, I found myself asking Mark more about the geography and the timing of things:
* the speakers' podium on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial
* how far the Reflecting Pool is from that ("Lincoln man" me didn't even go to either exact site the last two times I was in D.C., though both times I was all over the Mall from the Capitol to the Washington Monument!)
* where they were standing: near the left [south] edge of the pool, a relatively short way down its very long length)
* MLK and the other speakers looked tiny, but Mark could see them move as they spoke



I sorta picture the Nelson men's position as about here or a little closer; I didn't realize the trees were so thick and close in on the sides.

My mom wanted to put herself in Mark's place so she could feel like she was with my dad. I, on the other hand, was getting Mark to fill in setting details so I could get a spatial sense of things: standing in the sun near the left edge of the Reflecting Pool, hundreds of thousands of people all around, the steps of the Lincoln Memorial filled with speakers and VIPs, the giant statue of seated Lincoln in the shadows behind them.

.



The Nelson men would be about "behind" King's hand.


PeterNelson - 4/2/2007 at 04:55 PM

Dutch, you must have had quite a weekend!

I don't have a hippie calendar, but I found this "Hippyland Event Calendar." It's more of a "This Day in Hippie History," and there are usually multiple events listed for each date, each linked to a full story.

March 30
1945 - Eric Clapton born

Well, not much of a "full story":

quote:
Selected Event
Eric Clapton born
Type: Birthday
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
Event Description:
1945 - Eric Clapton, musician, founding member of Cream, born.
1972 - North Vietnamese launch massive attack, U.S. resumes bombing

March 31
1927 - César Chávez born

1968 - LBJ announces decision not to run again and offers partial Vietnam bombing halt

April 1
1970 - Cigarette advertising banned on radio and TV

1974 - Jane Fonda arrives in Vietnam on second visit

April 2
1965 - Ken Kesey busted for marijuana first time {Kesey again!}

http://www.hippy.com/php/modules.php?op=modload&name=Calendar&file= index

http://www.calendars.com/product.asp?IID=30448

Hey, Dutch--this result is found on page 2 of Googling "Hippie Calendar":

Hittin' The Web with The Allman Brothers Band :: Where Music Plus ...
Author:, Subject: Hippie Calendar Word of the Day. dutchoneill. Sublime Peach Posts: 7428 (7428 all sites) Registered: 6/4/2004 Status: Offline ...
allmanbrothersband.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=view thread&fid=114&tid... - 87k - Cached - Similar pages


dutchoneill - 4/3/2007 at 08:05 PM

Well Peter, it was quite a weekend, music wise and family wise. Good family stuff and not so good family stuff, but things are clearing up so here we go again....

April 3,2007 American Dream

the perfect life, exemplified by a married couple, he gainfully employed, she a housewife, with 2 healthy kids, preferably a boy and girl , living in a nice, pink house with a white picket fence in a quiet, tree-shaded heighborhood, with a car for him, a station wagon for her, a dog named Spot, and a cat named Puff.


Well, my wife is gainfully employed, she drives a euro car, I drive a SUV, I take the kids to and from the bus stop, grey house in a nice tree lined street, 2 kids, a boy and girl, and 2 grown and gone, no pets....close enough


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/

Url of this website:
http://www.allmanbrothersband.com//modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=viewthread&fid=114&tid=54425