Don't click or your IP will be banned


The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane
Posted by: davidgardiner on Saturday, August 31, 2002 - 11:47 AM

By: David Gardiner

I encountered your website for the first time today. I have enjoyed the Allman Brothers since I listened to them in high school in the early 1970s. I saw them live once but shortly after Duane died. I have long found inspiration in his guitar playing, and have often felt a remarkable similarity between the effect his playing has on me and the effect of another of my musical heroes, John Coltrane. Every now and then when no one else is home, this middle-aged father and college professor will play loudly one of my early ABB favorites, such as "Mountain Jam" from Eat a Peach.

I will clear out the family room so that I can move freely about in my idiosyncratic dancing style. Duane's solos on "Mountain Jam" (and the same goes for "Blue Sky" or for "Whipping Post" on the live at Fillmore album) inspire me to dance for an hour or more (with repeats) while I work up a great sweat swirling around the room in motions that are as expressive and diverse as I know. I am no dancer, but Duane makes me want to fly, and I can bounce in a rockish rhythm, sail in a ballet-like turn, and just generally wear out the carpet in the best mood I can make. I am exhilarated, relaxed and high as a kite (no chemicals for decades). Strangely, the only other music that can do that to me is John Coltrane's, in particular his "My Favorite Things." I do the same thing: when the house is empty I put on Coltrane and enter a world of whirling wonder for an hour or so. I must burn off so many calories and so, so happily.

I have often felt that these two musical geniuses share something, if only because of the way they can make me feel and the way they inspire me to want to move as powerfully and as gracefully as I can (I truly feel inspired and blessed when I hear, and especially dance to, their music). I feel a great surge of power and feeling in their music that I can only call spiritual. I feel that each of them is reaching in their music to express very deep and powerful human feelings and ways of knowing that are at times triumphant yet simultaneously tender, sad and even joyous. They can make me cry tears of bliss. I feel when I listen and dance that I am sharing in their exploration of the heights and depths of human feeling, and it is so powerfully alive to do so.

And so you may imagine the mind-blowing experience I had today when in perusing your web links I found the recording of a 1970 radio interview with Duane in which he spoke of some of his favorite music. Apparently on the show he played several songs on the air, but all of them were not included in this recording except for one. He mentioned the power of John Coltrane's music and offered to play a recording of the 1963 studio version of "My Favorite Things." I was stunned. There in Duane's calm yet steady prose (he was a damn mature fellow for around 23), he confirmed what I had only felt, but still knew, for years: that he and John Coltrane shared a musical and a spiritual affinity. Hearing Duane praise Coltrane, and then playing that song, was like having two strangely disparate strands of my life come together into one. How beautiful a confirmation.

I always knew how spiritual John Coltrane was, and had read some about his life. As for Duane, I had never read a thing but still knew in my bones that he was exploring and expressing deep and even glorious realms of human being, touching heaven and sharing its humanly embodied tone with us through his music. That interview gave flesh to my shy intuition, and I suppose even strengthened my appreciation (devotion?) for his musical accomplishments. I will listen to him more intently from now, though I would have thought before today that such was not possible.

Thanks for your website.



 
Login
 



 


Don't have an account yet? Create one and make this your personal spot on the Web!
Forgot your password?
Trouble logging in?

Related links
· More about All Topics
· News by davidgardiner




The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane | Log-in or register a new user account | 5 Comments
  
Comments are statements made by the person that posted them.
They do not necessarily represent the opinions of the site editor.
Re: The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane (Score: 1)
by goldtop (ront@goldtoprecords.com)
on Aug 31, 2002 - 01:03 PM
(User information | Send a message)
Couldn't be said any better. Beautiful!!!!! Just think,.... they're probably playin' My Favorite Things right know. Duane probably showed him Mtn Jam.


Re: The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane (Score: 1)
by Hophead (rcurrens at attbi dot com)
on Aug 31, 2002 - 01:32 PM
(User information | Send a message)
I hope somebody sends Prof. Gardiner a copy of the Gatlinburg tape! I think he will sh*t when he hears Duane actually -play- My Favorite Things!


Re: The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane (Score: 1)
by RobJohnson (ugapwi@hotmail.com)
on Sep 05, 2002 - 02:15 PM
(User information | Send a message)
David,

Well said! I would just like to add that two people who give me that same feeling are Carlos Santana and, of course, Derek Trucks. They both seem to reach for the same spiritual heights as Duane and Trane, and can take me to that next level that is beyond words.

Thanks for your article!

Rob Johnson


Re: The Serendipity of Two Musical Heroes: Duane Allman and John Coltrane (Score: 1)
by horacegammet (horacegammet@hotmail.com)
on Jan 03, 2003 - 01:48 PM
(User information | Send a message) http://http://
David--I completely agree w/your assessment re:Trane and Duane. The ABB did, after all, pull "Dreams" from Miles' "All Blues", on which Trane played a memorable solo. I know Jaimoe really hipped those guys to Miles and Trane, but I imagine Duane had to have heard a bit of Trane before that. Trane was very popular the hippie crowd, very in stuff to listen to.

I've always felt "A Love Supreme" and "Eat A Peach" were masterpieces of the highest order. Also, there's a spot in the Fillmore "Whipping Post" where you can hear a bit of "Resolution" from "A Love Supreme". You know, that dark, moody part--Duane definitely quoted that during the slow, moody part on the Fillmore W.P.. Hendrix was influenced heavily by Trane as well, as I'm sure you've noticed.

Thanks for your insightful observations. I very much enjyed reading them.

HoraceGammett



Privacy | Terms of Service
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com